(Topic ID: 122234)

Installing Barakandl's NVRAM Battery Eliminator- Vid's Review


By vid1900

4 years ago



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  • Latest reply 3 years ago by CNKay
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    There are 211 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 5.
    19
    #1 4 years ago

    No matter how new your batteries are, they can leak and eat your very expensive circuit boards.

    You can install remote battery packs, coin cell batteries or other devices to prevent board damage, but the ultimate solution is just replacing the regular RAM with NVRAM. No batteries to replace yearly, no losing your high scores, no leakage, and your data is good for 30 years.

    Andrew "Barakandl" here on pinside, sells RAMTRON FM1608 NVRAM chips that eliminate the need for batteries.

    They cost (depending on how many you buy) $8-12 USD. This makes for a VERY affordable solution.

    There was some argument on the forums saying that the FM1608 was not going to work on pinball boards because of some kind of "compatibility issue", although when I looked up the specs, they seemed to be a perfect match.

    So I got some chips and set off to put them to the test.

    https://pinside.com/pinball/market/ad/18038

    #2 4 years ago

    These FM1608 will work in Data East System 2, Data East System 3, Stern Whitestar, Sega, Williams System 11B / System 11C, Williams WPC, WPC-S and WPC-95 pinball machines.

    Most MPU boards have sockets on their RAM chips, because this is a commonly replaced item.

    Even if the board did not come from the factory with a socket, there is a good chance that at some point the RAM failed and the tech replaced the RAM and added a socket.

    -

    I decided that I'd do Whitewater first with the NVRAM.

    I knew my Whitewater did not have a RAM socket, so by choosing it, I could document the most "difficult" RAM replacement (most owners will simply swap the RAM, no need to even remove the board from the game). Whitewater is a WPC board.

    What I did not know was that the batteries I replaced last summer had already leaked.

    Yep, that's a 2023 expiration code on those batteries.....

    1.jpg

    I held the board upside down over the trash and cut the battery board off with wire cutters and let it drop.

    I did not want all that alkaline crud flaking off and lodging all over the board while trying to remove the batteries.

    #3 4 years ago

    Next you need to identify the old RAM.

    Here it is, the only chip not in a socket, lol.

    You can see I've clipped off the battery holder to the right.

    2.jpg
    #4 4 years ago

    Next, I unsoldered the old RAM with my Metcal de-solder-vac station.

    By using the Metcal, the old RAM simply dropped out of the board when I finished desoldering the last legs.

    -

    If you did not have a desoldering station, you would cut all the legs off the chip with a small pair of Diags, then remove each leg individually. That's much more work, and some would say riskier work, so a desoldering station is a good investment if you plan on doing lot's of board work in the future.

    3.jpg
    #5 4 years ago

    Of course we could just solder the NVRAM back to the board, just like the old RAM was installed.

    But the tiny traces on these boards can only handle so may soldering/unsoldering cycles - so we install a socket.

    Here I installed two rows of sockets for the NVRAM.

    In 30 years when this NVRAM wears out, the next owner of this game will thank me.

    4.jpg
    #6 4 years ago

    Once the solder cools, clean up your flux from the back of the board.

    You can use Naphtha and an old, soft toothbrush.

    8.jpg
    #7 4 years ago

    Next you install your NVRAM.

    There is a silkscreen on the board that shows the "polarity" of the chip. The silkscreen shows the notch that needs to match the chip's notch.

    On well designed circuit boards, all the notches on all the chips will all face the same direction - but this is not always the case. Always check the silkscreen.

    The SIPS sockets are super tight the first 10 insertions, so be very careful that the chip legs go into the center of the socket, and don't get folded under.

    You can run your thumbnail along the row of legs to get them all into their sockets at the same time.

    5.jpg
    #8 4 years ago

    Save your old RAM.

    Stick it into a block of conductive foam, or wrap it in tinfoil. RAM is static sensitive, so you don't want it just rattling around in your parts drawers without some conductive maternal around the legs.

    Although you will probably switch all your games over to NVRAM, the old RAM can be good for troubleshooting a dead board that you don't want to risk killing a good chip on.

    6.jpg

    #9 4 years ago

    Next, put the board back in the game.

    Keep your finger on the power switch in case you screwed up, and turn her on.

    The game will say "Factory Settings Restored" and "Bookkeeping Totals Restored".

    Play the game, enter a new high score and turn her off.

    Upon return of power you will see everything stored correctly, just like you had batteries installed.

    7.jpg
    #10 4 years ago

    So the RAMTRON FM1608 works perfectly in pinball machines - the controversy has been settled.

    Barakandl's no battery solution is certainly priced right, and works great!

    Highly recommended.

    9.jpg
    #11 4 years ago

    Thanks for this vid. I will pick up some for all the games that do not have midnight madness multiball.

    #12 4 years ago
    Quoted from Syco54645:

    Thanks for this vid. I will pick up some for all the games that do not have midnight madness multiball.

    Good point.

    I believe all these games would not do the Midnight mode at midnight or show the clock correctly, although they would still work in general with the NVRAM:

    Dirty Harry
    Congo
    NBA Fastbreak
    Johnny Mnemonic
    junkyard
    Whodunnit
    TZ

    #13 4 years ago

    As said before, we used many Ramtron FM1608 in WPC games in the past, never had a problem.
    Maybe you can show how to replace the blocking diode with a jumper wire also.

    Marco

    #14 4 years ago

    I love SIP strips, I use them quite a bit. One tip to those that may want to make this a little easier on themselves.... Put the SIPs onto the legs of the chip first, and then put the whole thing in to solder. They stay in nice and tight, and you don't have to swear at the chip when you bend the legs all over hell and back again because you don't have any fingernails (Don't ask me how I know)

    #15 4 years ago

    Awesome job Vid!!!!

    These are plug and play ready as a no battery needed 6264 RAM for Data East System 2, Data East Sytem 3, Stern Whitestar, Sega games. All of those games have an IC socket from the factory pre installed. To use the FM1608 in these games it is just a matter of removing the Batteries. Removing the original 6264 SRAM. Plugging in the FM1608 NVRAM and you are done! It is no harder than replacing a ROM.

    They also work in WPC games and Sys 11 B&C, but you will need to install an IC socket like Vid has shown. The real time clock will only be running while the game is turned on, so if the game has time sensitive features, they may not trigger at the right time. For most people this is minor and not having to worry about leaking batteries outweighs the loss of time / date accuracy.

    FM1608
    ----
    1-9 $12 each
    10-24 $11 each
    25-49 $10 each
    50-99 $9 each
    100+ $8 each

    Shipping starts out at $3 for quantity 1-10.

    Find my original for sale post here. I also have other goodies like MC6821P, PCD5101P, TIP102, MC6802P.

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/fs-mc6821p-mc6802p-pcd5101p-tip102-genuine-parts-great-price

    Watch for my low cost 5101 battery eliminating RAM solution coming soon!

    #16 4 years ago
    Quoted from MarAlb:

    As said before, we used many Ramtron FM1608 in WPC games in the past, never had a problem.
    Maybe you can show how to replace the blocking diode with a jumper wire also.
    Marco

    This is will not be needed to be done in any games using a Data East System 2, Data East Sytem 3, Stern Whitestar, Sega, or WPC MPU. The FM1608 has the exact same voltage requirements as 6264 RAM originally used from the factory. These games are using a low voltage drop diode and start to reset before the RAM goes below the minimum voltage the manufacturer specifies.

    #17 4 years ago
    Quoted from MarAlb:

    Maybe you can show how to replace the blocking diode with a jumper wire also.

    I'll look through my 11s and see if I can install one in there, take some pics.

    #18 4 years ago

    Compatible Game List!

    Plug and Play ready games:

    Sega/Stern Whitestar
    Apollo 13
    Austin Powers
    Godzilla
    Goldeneye
    Harley Davidson
    High Roller Casino
    Independence Day
    Lost in Space
    Monopoly
    NFL
    Playboy 02
    Rollercoaster Tycoon
    Sharkey's Shootout
    South Park
    Star Wars Trilogy
    Starship Troopers
    Striker Extreme
    Terminator 3
    Lost World: Jurassic Park
    Simpsons Pinball Party
    X-Files
    Twister
    Viper Night Drivin'
    Elvis
    Grand Prix
    NASCAR
    Ripley's
    Lord of the Rings
    Sopranos

    Data East V2
    Monday Night Football
    Phantom of the Opera
    Playboy 89
    Secret Service
    Time Machine
    Torpedo Alley.

    Data East V3
    Rocky & Bullwinkle
    Back to the Future
    Batman
    Checkpoint
    Guns N Roses
    Hook Jurassic Park
    Lethal Weapon 3
    Star Trek 91
    Star Wars 92
    Tales from the Crypt
    TMNT
    The Simpsons 90
    Tommy
    WWF Royal Rumble

    DE/Sega V3B
    Batman Forever
    Baywatch
    Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
    Maverick

    Games that will work, but need an IC socket installed. 11B and 11C will need one jumper removed and one jumper added.

    Williams System 11B
    Bad Cats
    Banzai Run
    Big Guns
    Black Knight 2k
    Cyclone
    Earthshaker
    Elvira and the Party Monsters
    Jokerz!
    Mousin' Around
    Police Force
    Space Station
    Swords of Fury
    Taxi
    Transporter
    Whirlwind

    Williams System 11C
    Bugs Bunny Birthday Ball
    Diner
    Dr Dude
    Pool Sharks
    Radical
    Riverboat Gambler
    Rollergames
    Game Show

    WPC
    Funhouse
    Harley Davidson
    Bride of Pinbot
    Demo Man
    Indiana Jones 93
    Judge Dredd
    Popeye
    Start Trek 93
    Gilligan's Island
    Hurricane
    SlugFest
    Terminator 2
    Party Zone
    Addams Family
    Black Rose
    Bram Stokers Dracule
    Creature from the Black Lagoon
    Doctor Who
    Fish Tales
    Getaway
    Twilight Zone
    White Water
    Corvette
    Dirty Harry
    Indy 500
    Jack Bot
    Johnny Mneumonic
    No Fear
    Road Show
    Flintstones
    Shadow
    Theater of Magic
    Who Dunnit
    World Cup Soccer 94
    Attack from Mars
    Cactus Canyon
    Cirqus Voltaire
    Congo
    Junk Yard
    Medievel Madness
    Monster Bash
    NBA FastBreak
    No Good Gophers
    Safe Cracker
    Scared Stiff
    Tales of the Arabian Nights
    Champion Pub

    #19 4 years ago

    Curious, why isn't this thread simply titled 'testing FM1608 in a pinball MPU'

    It would be like reviewing the ROMs I sell vs the ones Astill sells, or GPE's LM339s vs Big Daddy's LM339s like they are any different?

    If this was a product Andrew had made - example, a SMT RAMTRON on an adapter card - that would imply it was his product, and there would be a reason to compare and contrast it to the products that other sellers sell.

    The controversy over whether this product would work in a pinball MPU wasn't because Andrew was selling it - it's because other NVRAM sellers had concern over compatibility. It looks like real world testing proves it will work. At least so far.

    I don't know the reasoning why other sellers said it wouldn't work.

    #20 4 years ago

    A couple other comments - definitely save that old RAM chip if you can! There are plenty of other uses of 6264s in pinball boards, and saving a couple bucks on a future needed part effectively makes the chip cost even less

    Not all WPCs are directly configured with 6264s. The WPC MPU can be rejumpered to use a 62256, and some games shipped with them. I've seen 62256s in Judge Dredd, Demo Man, and IJ from the factory - and probably others.

    To convert a WPC-89 MPU that is set up with a 62256 to use one of these RAMTRONs, add resistor R93 (1.5k ohm) and remove jumper W3. Failure to do this will keep the MPU from booting once it is installed.

    Also, you can add WPC-S and WPC-95 to your games that are compatible.

    #21 4 years ago
    Quoted from barakandl:

    This is will not be needed to be done in any games using a Data East System 2, Data East Sytem 3, Stern Whitestar, Sega, or WPC MPU. The FM1608 has the exact same voltage requirements as 6264 RAM originally used from the factory. These games are using a low voltage drop diode and start to reset before the RAM goes below the minimum voltage the manufacturer specifies.

    You can leave the blocking diode there, in most of the cases that wouldn't hurt. The blocking diode has no function anymore in this setting, so why not remove it to let the FRAM run at the full supply voltage available? It isn't a big deal to remove it and replace it by a jumper.

    #22 4 years ago
    Quoted from johnwartjr:

    Not all WPCs are directly configured with 6264s. The WPC MPU can be rejumpered to use a 62256, and some games shipped with them. I've seen 62256s in Judge Dredd, Demo Man, and IJ from the factory - and probably others.

    Almost every Indiana Jones with original CPU board i have seen had a 32K8 62256 SRAM installed. I often wondered what the reason was Williams did this. Did they use the extra amount of memory or didn't they simply had no 8K8 SRAM devices available at the moment of manufacturing?? I didn't want to take the risk in the past and installed FM1808 32k8 FRAM's in those games.....

    #23 4 years ago
    Quoted from johnwartjr:

    Curious, why isn't this thread simply titled 'testing FM1608 in a pinball MPU'

    It's like those big Capacitors that they sell to stiffen up your car stereo amps.

    The companies that market them, don't actually manufacture them.

    They buy them, test them under load and put their label on them.

    When Car Stereo Review reviews them, they don't say "2 farad capacitor review", they say "Black Lightning Megastiff Review - Black is Back!".

    -
    Andrew is testing each of these before shipment, so the product you are buying is his own "value added product".

    If you just bought one off of Ebay from China, you could get a fake one, a remarked one, a cull or a pull.....

    So it only makes sense to call this a Barakandi product.

    #24 4 years ago

    I posted this in this thread - https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/which-games-should-not-use-nvram#post-2200388 - but it bears repeating here:

    The only reason not to use NVRAM on games with midnight madness modes is you want the game to keep the correct time even when off and are playing the game at midnight so that a midnight madness mode actually happens at midnight. The clock runs with NVRAM but only when the game is on. What this means is that you will get midnight madness mode every 24 hours the game is on with NVRAM, which may or may not happen at midnight. IMHO that's more fun and interesting than having to get up to play a game at midnight, which for some people isn't practical.

    Search will turn up a list of machines with midnight madness modes and the discussion of the impact of using NVRAM in them. That discussion has been around the forum multiple times.
    There's no technical reason to not use NVRAM in a WPC game. The only games where there is a technical reason not to use NVRAM are Gottlieb System 3 (technically this has been solved though not at a practical level) and Game Plan (and technically this *could* be done too but requires board modifications).

    viperrwk

    #25 4 years ago
    Quoted from johnwartjr:

    Curious, why isn't this thread simply titled 'testing FM1608 in a pinball MPU'

    I kinda thought the same thing. This isn't a new idea, and not dissing what's being offered but testing it doesn't make it unique.

    Quoted from vid1900:

    Andrew is testing each of these before shipment, so the product you are buying is his own "value added product". If you just bought one off of Ebay from China, you could get a fake one, a remarked one, a cull or a pull..... So it only makes sense to call this a Barakandi product.

    So I hunt out, buy and sell Hallmark pinball related Christmas ornaments. I do! I test them. Can I get a review? I call them Big Daddy's Old Hallmark Bugs Bunny and Santa Christmas Ornaments! Only available at Big Daddy with the Big Daddy GUARANTEE!

    Sorry, I see it as proof what a lot of people already have been doing, myself included with new parts. It's a nice installation guide but it shouldn't be a review of one offering.

    #26 4 years ago

    those chips have a 45 year data retention, so even if the earliest date code is 2004, thats a 2049 life expectancy.

    #27 4 years ago
    Quoted from toddsvec:

    So I hunt out, buy and sell Hallmark pinball related Christmas ornaments. I do! I test them. Can I get a review? I call them Big Daddy's Old Hallmark Bugs Bunny and Santa Christmas Ornaments! Only available at Big Daddy with the Big Daddy GUARANTEE!

    If it's pinball related, I'll do my best to give it a fair review.

    Quoted from toddsvec:

    Sorry, I see it as proof what a lot of people already have been doing, myself included with new parts. It's a nice installation guide but it shouldn't be a review of one offering.

    It can be whatever someone wants it to be to them:

    You want it as a proof that a part works in a certain application? There you go.

    You want it as an installation guide? I got it for you, right here.

    You want it as a review of one man's value added obsolete product that he tests and guarantees to perform in a pinball machine? Come and get a steaming heap of it.

    -4
    #28 4 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    You want it as an installation guide? I got it for you, right here.

    And thanks for that, it's a nice install guide.

    Quoted from vid1900:

    It can be whatever someone wants it to be to them:

    I want peanut butter.

    Quoted from vid1900:

    You want it as a review of one man's value added obsolete product that he tests and guarantees to perform in a pinball machine? Come and get a steaming heap of it.

    I guess, but it's still just a chip that hasn't been altered or improved on. Only used and tested. That test does not give any indication of life of the product even though it's likely going to last longer than most of us. I do appreciate most of your reviews and tutorials, they're really helpful as is this one as an install guide. There's tons of stuff out there that could use reviews, true unique replacement stuff that has it's good and bad. This is just a chip. Not a new product. And I can't wait to hear the review of my (tested) pinball Christmas ornaments!

    #29 4 years ago
    Quoted from toddsvec:

    And I can't wait to hear the review of my (tested) pinball Christmas ornaments!

    Better hurry up and send it for review; my boyfriend wants to take the tree down before Easter.

    #30 4 years ago

    Damn man, you are being hard on Barakandl for making the equivalent of lunch money for the trouble of finding these chips, testing them, and making sure pinball guys have a place to get them from reliably.

    Would it make you happy if Vid called it "Vid's Review of Barakandl's FM1608 Testing Service"?

    #31 4 years ago
    Quoted from toddsvec:

    I kinda thought the same thing. This isn't a new idea, and not dissing what's being offered but testing it doesn't make it unique.

    So I hunt out, buy and sell Hallmark pinball related Christmas ornaments. I do! I test them. Can I get a review? I call them Big Daddy's Old Hallmark Bugs Bunny and Santa Christmas Ornaments! Only available at Big Daddy with the Big Daddy GUARANTEE!
    Sorry, I see it as proof what a lot of people already have been doing, myself included with new parts. It's a nice installation guide but it shouldn't be a review of one offering.

    Damn, dude, settle down. Barakandl has some time and money invested in researching the use of these chips in various pin hardware, testing them, and seeking out and distributing a thousand or so chips. He's not making tons of cash doing this, either.

    I would wager that part of what prompted this, anyhow, is Borygard's libelous statements trying to trash Barakandl for selling these chips, when Borygard is selling effectively the same thing for 3x the price (and probably at least 10x the profit.)

    #32 4 years ago
    Quoted from Collin:

    ...I would wager that part of what prompted this, anyhow, is Borygard's libelous statements trying to trash Barakandl for selling these chips, when Borygard is selling effectively the same thing for 3x the price (and probably at least 10x the profit.)

    I design, engineer, and build quality, tested products with unparalleled support. The “1/3 price” item is re-claimed, used scrap, bought in bulk, there is no comparison.

    --
    Rob Anthony
    Pinball Classics
    http://LockWhenLit.com
    Quality Board Work - In Home Service
    borygard at gmail dot com

    15
    #33 4 years ago

    Alright, let's get back to fixing pinballs and put our dicks away.

    dick measuring-stick.jpg
    #34 4 years ago

    Thanks for the excellent writeup vid. Anyone know if this would turn Roadshow's HSTD into high score of the last 24 hours since on?

    #35 4 years ago

    Another MPU board that usually does not come from the factory with socketed RAM is the WPC-95, so let's do that one next.

    IMG_1033.jpg
    #36 4 years ago

    Here the RAM is hidden under the Warranty Label.

    Pull it and void it.

    2.jpg
    #37 4 years ago

    Unsolder your old RAM chip, and remove.

    3.jpg
    #38 4 years ago

    Solder in your new sockets (you might start noticing a pattern here).

    Neat solder work is next to godliness.

    4.jpg
    #39 4 years ago

    Carefully insert your NVRAM into the sockets.

    Don't let any legs get folded under.

    Use your thumbnail to get all the legs into the center of the sockets - they need to all go in at once.

    Insert all the back legs, then do the row facing you with your thumbnail.

    5.jpg

    17
    #40 4 years ago

    Finally, replace your Warranty Label before Williams finds out.

    6.jpg
    #41 4 years ago
    Quoted from guarda:

    Thanks for the excellent writeup vid. Anyone know if this would turn roadshow's HSTD into high score of the last 24 hours since on?

    You will lose your old high scores - but, on the bright side, unlike batteries that don't last a year, this will hold the new ones forever once you set new ones.

    So :

    Pre NVRAM scores - lost.

    Post NVRAM scores - held forever (well, 30 to 45 years....almost forever).

    #42 4 years ago

    Roadshow has a feature called High Score of the Day which resets every night at midnight. Not that it really matters to me but I'm assuming that functionality will be lost.

    #43 4 years ago
    Quoted from guarda:

    roadshow has a feature called High Score of the Day which resets every night at midnight. Not that it really matters to me but I'm assuming that functionality will be lost.

    I suspect that it might keep the daily high score for 24 hours of on-time.

    That could be quite a while if you only play 1/2 hour a day.

    Anyone test this?

    #44 4 years ago

    If no one else does, I'd be happy to test and report back after installing. (Might be awhile)

    #45 4 years ago

    One thing I'd like to add - you don't have to use the SIPs with these, as they are DIP parts. A good quality dual wipe socket will work just as well.

    I know some people love the SIPs, personally, I don't care for them.

    #46 4 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Another MPU board that usually does not come from the factory with socketed RAM is the WPC-95, so let's do that one next.

    This board had a 32K8 SRAM.....

    #47 4 years ago

    even with regular ram does the RTC keep running? my games go way out of whack date/time wise if they are left off for a long period of time... I set the time on my CV when i got it and I think it thinks it's still January last I checked

    #48 4 years ago

    What jumpers need modification on system b and c?

    #49 4 years ago
    Quoted from MarAlb:

    This board had a 32K8 SRAM.....

    Interestingly, I've installed NVRAMs on quite a few WPC-95s with 62256 RAM chips, and the 6264 seems to work as a direct swap, no need to jumper.

    #50 4 years ago
    Quoted from indy5mike:

    What jumpers need modification on system b and c?

    Couple things if your board originally has a 6116 instead of a 6264

    1) You need to pull the factory RAM, desolder the 4 extra adjacent pads next to the original RAM, and fit a 28 pin socket

    2) Remove jumper W5 and install jumper W6

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