(Topic ID: 151064)

To sell or not to sell?


By Dan63

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 42 posts
  • 25 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by NicoVolta
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

You

Linked Games

Topic Gallery

One image has been uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

TheCaptain_(resized).jpg

#1 3 years ago

Just curious. Do any EM machines really increase in value? What are some of the instances where a machine might exceed its “Blue Book” value? A lot of EM’s I see that are within reason sell between $400-1000 depending on condition. I’m sure the ones that are completely restored fetch more, but then again how much was spent to get the machine to that restored condition? Unless one can do the restoration, then it would be worth it. I guess the reason I ask this is I’m debating about selling my machine and although I enjoy having it I feel as times passes it’s not really going to be worth more than what I actually have in it. Don’t get me wrong I love the game and I love playing pinball, just trying balance things out.

#2 3 years ago

There seems to be trends in pinball that drive prices. Certain titles are always popular and some seem to become hot titles through rediscovery. Some types of games cool off as another type gets elevated. So yes some games do increase in value and some decrease, depending on what is desirable at the time.

What game are we talking about?

#3 3 years ago

EMs are affordable. I see no reason to predict demand will suddenly surge in the future.

Importantly, it is just as easy to end up "upside down" in a SS/alphanumeric/DMD game because of an larger number of more expensive parts.

It is part of the hobby. If you want your project to be worth what you have into it at the end, you need to get a great deal on it and be careful about what you spend restoring it. Most people don't find this a fun way to restore pins and would rather restore them how they'd like than be worried about whether they'll get their money back one day.

#4 3 years ago
Quoted from Dan63:

Just curious. Do any EM machines really increase in value? What are some of the instances where a machine might exceed its “Blue Book” value? A lot of EM’s I see that are within reason sell between $400-1000 depending on condition. I’m sure the ones that are completely restored fetch more, but then again how much was spent to get the machine to that restored condition? Unless one can do the restoration, then it would be worth it. I guess the reason I ask this is I’m debating about selling my machine and although I enjoy having it I feel as times passes it’s not really going to be worth more than what I actually have in it. Don’t get me wrong I love the game and I love playing pinball, just trying balance things out.

Your sofa is going down in value; are you thinking of selling that?

#5 3 years ago
Quoted from Dan63:

I feel as times passes it’s not really going to be worth more than what I actually have in it.

It could be worth next to nothing as time passes. If it no longer brings you joy, it may be time to ditch it and find something that does. Life is too short to worry about the maybes, what the market might be in the future.

#6 3 years ago

If it is worth $1000.00 today and you like playing it then why worry about it? If the price declines the most you would lose is $1000.00. Assume it is worth $1000.00 today but will only be worth $800.00 two years from now: Do you think you could get $200.00 of entertainment value out of it in the next two years?

I'm picking magic numbers here but you get the idea.

I look at it for what it is. For me, it is a hobby. Hobbies, by definition cost money. Sometimes, with a hobby one can make some money, but usually hobbies are money pits. Like buying a new circuit board

So, you like to play golf. After you sink several hundred dollars in golf clubs and the other trash you need to play the game, you have green fees to pay. Green fees are money in the wind. And the market for used golf clubs is not a strong one.

Like to fish? Fishing poles. Hooks, line, sinkers, lures---and don't forget the stink bait. Fishing license. Gas to get to the lake. Or river. And you don't want to take the good car, so now you need a fishing wagon and more car insurance.

Like to hunt? You might make money on your guns. But if you are going to go shooting you have ammo expense (not cheap) and gas for the drive.

Just consider it a hobby and not a moneymaking adventure and decide it like that. If you don't need the money the money to pay the rent and you like playing it then continue to play it and enjoy it.

#7 3 years ago

TKO, Strange World, Blue Note, Gemini, Mata Hari EM, Evil Knievel EM, Joker Poker EM, Space Walk (Countdown's EM alter ego).
Perfect collector quality Wizard, Capt Fantastic, 4 million BC, Nip It and Fireball. Risers - time is on THEIR side now.

B Level:
El Dorado, Canada Dry, Centigrade 37, Old Chicago, about 18 others.

Aside from these and a few others prior to 1970 I do not know about, just have fun.

#8 3 years ago

I enjoy Blue Note every time I play it. It isn't just the history of the game, I find it to be a lot of fun.

#9 3 years ago
Quoted from DaveH:

I enjoy Blue Note every time I play it. It isn't just the history of the game, I find it to be a lot of fun.

Play Rock Star a lot and it is pretty fun.

#10 3 years ago

The only way I'll sell any pins is to make room for new ones and that's the only way I'll look at it.

#11 3 years ago

It's like buying a car. Goes down hill fast then levels off. Then, rarely, it becomes a collectors item and increases. Enjoy playing them. If you want to make money, you are in the wrong hobby.

#12 3 years ago

to give any kind of reasonable answer the name of the machine is needed

#13 3 years ago

I would like a Canada Dry Pin! You have one for sale, let me know!

#14 3 years ago
Quoted from games_r_fun:

I would like a Canada Dry Pin! You have one for sale, let me know!

me too!

#15 3 years ago

It's a hobby, not an investment although some do make money doing it. The games I've sold are the ones I did not like. Not the ones I felt had reached their peak in value. I did, however, sell all the gold I had back when it was $1850 an ounce.

#16 3 years ago
Quoted from Dan63:

Do any EM machines really increase in value?

Seems the minute I show up they do.

#17 3 years ago

Canada Dry +3

#18 3 years ago

Re: hobby or investment it's personal choice . A handful of guys flip, wheel & deal , rack up
Miles on vehicles and countless hours of travel. Those same guys are the ones who tell me the hobby pays for itself. LOL Sure if you think so

I overpay more than I get deals but I enjoy the living ch1t out if all my games . Selling is timing with the market. Right now everyone wants an Atlantis as the rush on C-37 is winding down . Bad time to want an Atlantis because the market dictates you will pay top dollar for a pin that really was abundant and reasonable 5-10 years ago. I'll blame EBay for this one for fetching $3000 for a pristine example

#19 3 years ago
Quoted from JoeGrenuk:

Your sofa is going down in value; are you thinking of selling that?

Excellent point

#20 3 years ago
Quoted from cottonm4:

If it is worth $1000.00 today and you like playing it then why worry about it? If the price declines the most you would lose is $1000.00. Assume it is worth $1000.00 today but will only be worth $800.00 two years from now: Do you think you could get $200.00 of entertainment value out of it in the next two years?
I'm picking magic numbers here but you get the idea.
I look at it for what it is. For me, it is a hobby. Hobbies, by definition cost money. Sometimes, with a hobby one can make some money, but usually hobbies are money pits. Like buying a new circuit board
So, you like to play golf. After you sink several hundred dollars in golf clubs and the other trash you need to play the game, you have green fees to pay. Green fees are money in the wind. And the market for used golf clubs is not a strong one.
Like to fish? Fishing poles. Hooks, line, sinkers, lures---and don't forget the stink bait. Fishing license. Gas to get to the lake. Or river. And you don't want to take the good car, so now you need a fishing wagon and more car insurance.
Like to hunt? You might make money on your guns. But if you are going to go shooting you have ammo expense (not cheap) and gas for the drive.
Just consider it a hobby and not a moneymaking adventure and decide it like that. If you don't need the money the money to pay the rent and you like playing it then continue to play it and enjoy it.

I like the responses...believe I have two other hobbies and I know how it can be. I'm just making sure I'm going to be as crazy as the rest of you over the next several years! LOL

#21 3 years ago

Hey guys thanks for the great responses. It was two-fold really. One reason for me to keep the game and games I will acquire and another about what I should pay for a game. Even though the guy before may have sunk thousand into a restore doesn't mean I have to pay what he has in it, just a fair price for the condition of the game.

#22 3 years ago
Quoted from Dan63:

Hey guys thanks for the great responses. It was two-fold really. One reason for me to keep the game and games I will acquire and another about what I should pay for a game. Even though the guy before may have sunk thousand into a restore doesn't mean I have to pay what he has in it, just a fair price for the condition of the game.

Right. And of course that also means if you decide to install a $90 mod to a game, do it because you think it's awesome and you like it, not because you think it will increase the game's resale value by $90.

#23 3 years ago

Im looking to pick up a very rough game, "A" list tittle. shipping 200, new repo pf, 600, new repo backglass 300, paint job 500. Might sell it for $2200. But I have fun doing it.

#24 3 years ago

If you enjoy the hobby and are expert level like some guys have become. Eventually when you need to build yourself a keeper game you are your own best friend with the tools and knowledge.

#25 3 years ago
Quoted from 1974DeltaQueen:

If you enjoy the hobby and are expert level like some guys have become. Eventually when you need to build yourself a keeper game you are your own best friend with the tools and knowledge.

That's true!!

#26 3 years ago

Its like any expensive hobby. You win some, you lose some. You buy a game typically with the intention of keeping it. If I break even great. If I lose 500 dollars or more after 3 or so years of enjoying a game then so what. If I gain 500 or more dollars from a game after enjoying it then so be it. If I bought a 75 Atlantis for 1600 dollars (example) and 5 years from now the game is worth 1000 dollars (oh well) if the game is worth 2600 then again cool and "oh well". It is vastly different i feel on say a NIB Stern LE at 7500-9000 dollars and the game ends up only being worth 3500-4500 dollars because of lack of code or the game ends up being a turd. It makes me very happy that the EM games have been out for 38+ years and are well established on what the masses find good or not good.

#27 3 years ago

Another thing you might think about is trade value. This is not necessarily equivalent to monetary value. As an example, I traded on a two-for-one to get a game I really wanted. I could have posted them for sale, and to get the price I wanted may have had to wait a while to sell both games and then find the desired game. For an immediate trade, the convenience and time saved to not have to go through a long sales and buy process carries a value beyond dollars. If you are simply tired of a game consider you might consider its value as trade bait.

#28 3 years ago

I'd like to find a nice Captain Fantastic. Just wish I could find one locally or within a reasonable driving distance. What are the costs in most cases to ship a game say from the mid west to the west coast in California?

#29 3 years ago
Quoted from wayout440:

Another thing you might think about is trade value. This is not necessarily equivalent to monetary value. As an example, I traded on a two-for-one to get a game I really wanted. I could have posted them for sale, and to get the price I wanted may have had to wait a while to sell both games and then find the desired game. For an immediate trade, the convenience and time saved to not have to go through a long sales and buy process carries a value beyond dollars. If you are simply tired of a game consider you might consider its value as trade bait.

Good point! Trade value works for me as well.

#30 3 years ago
Quoted from Dan63:

I'd like to find a nice Captain Fantastic. Just wish I could find one locally or within a reasonable driving distance. What are the costs in most cases to ship a game say from the mid west to the west coast in California?

350-450

#31 3 years ago
Quoted from Dan63:

What are the costs in most cases to ship a game say from the mid west to the west coast in California?

~$450 via STI. A second game adds another $40 though, and a third game game another $40, etc., so it really helps to ship more than one at a time when possible.

#32 3 years ago

Time is also an expence

I picked up a $500 project game on the weekend. Three hour round trip + fuel

All part of the hobby

#33 3 years ago
Quoted from Dan63:

I'd like to find a nice Captain Fantastic.

Texas is close to Cali correct? The head is now the proper color. Cab could use a little work but bg and pf are nice

--Jeff

TheCaptain_(resized).jpg

#34 3 years ago

Generally the market is split between projects/hobbies/player games and museum pieces. 99% fall into the former camp.

If you buy a game from Craigslist, tinker with it a bit, maybe replace some rubbers and fix a few things... you'll typically get your money back or maybe even make a few dollars unless you paid too much for it in the first place.

Generally, unless your game is especially desirable or rare, it won't dramatically increase in value unless you put in a ton of time and effort and go for a full restoration. You have to commit to going "all the way" or you might as well not bother because collectors won't bite if it isn't perfect. Which rarely makes sense as a business plan, financially speaking, unless you can attract the kind of clientele who are willing to compensate you for the trouble. Even then, it's craftsman-level work... no get rich quick here... probably not even minimum wage compared to traditional vocations.

But hey, we do it because we love it, right?

#35 3 years ago

Just like those car restorers. Blows my mind how much they lose on a sale after it's not 'fresh'. If I had the money I'd have a restored hotrod, though. Can't take it with you, plus my kids would only spend their inheritance on stupid stuff anyway.

#36 3 years ago
Quoted from Dan63:

I'd like to find a nice Captain Fantastic. Just wish I could find one locally or within a reasonable driving distance.

losangeles.craigslist.org link

#37 3 years ago
Quoted from way2wyrd:

Texas is close to Cali correct? The head is now the proper color. Cab could use a little work but bg and pf are nice
--Jeff

TheCaptain_(resized).jpg

How much?

#38 3 years ago
Quoted from JoeGrenuk:

Your sofa is going down in value; are you thinking of selling that?

you ever have one of those moments where a word just doesnt look right or sound right then you think "who the hell made up that word?"

sofa. m'er f'n sofa.... say it s o f a

#39 3 years ago

My Lazy Boy recliner has gone way down in value but there is no way I'm selling it. It's like an old friend now.

#40 3 years ago

did we ever find out the title of the game the op was talking about?

#41 3 years ago
Quoted from NicoVolta:

Generally the market is split between projects/hobbies/player games and museum pieces. 99% fall into the former camp.

The market has a much broader spectrum than this. It's not that clear cut.

Quoted from NicoVolta:

You have to commit to going "all the way" or you might as well not bother because collectors won't bite if it isn't perfect.

Not really true either, but I get where you're coming from. It's just not representative of the entire collector market.

#42 3 years ago

Yeah, might as well take that with a grain of salt. Not meant to be an absolute rule... just a trend I've noticed how most games in the marketplace between 10%-80% quality attract the same group of lowballers in droves. Whereas if you have a museum piece... the sheer sparkle of it drives 'em away like vampires hiding from the sun.

Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
From: $ 18.00
Apparel - Men
Pinside Shop
Wanted
Machine - Wanted
Wien, WIEN
€ 8.40
$ 4.49
Electronics
Yorktown Parts and Equip
$ 99.99
Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
Lighted Pinball Mods
From: $ 42.00
Cabinet - Shooter Rods
ModFather Pinball Mods
$ 17.00
Electronics
Yorktown Parts and Equip
$ 48.00
Cabinet - Other
ModFather Pinball Mods
From: $ 9.99
Eproms
Matt's Basement Arcade
$ 29.95
Gameroom - Decorations
Pinball Photos
$ 76.95
Cabinet - Shooter Rods
Super Skill Shot Shop
$ 49.00
Gameroom - Decorations
Pinball Photos
$ 9.95
$ 99.00
Hardware
Pappy's Pinball Palace
$ 239.99
Lighting - Led
PinballBulbs
$ 26.99
Lighting - Interactive
Lee's Parts
$ 20.00
Playfield - Decals
DevilsMuse Arcade
$ 180.00
Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
Pinball Customs

Hey there! Got a moment?

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside