(Topic ID: 304953)

A rivetting conversation. Talk about rivets and rivet tools.

By EvanDickson

2 years ago


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  • 50 posts
  • 17 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by BorgDog
  • Topic is favorited by 20 Pinsiders

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    #2 2 years ago

    would say yes

    #3 2 years ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    Would either of these be suitable for rivetting ramp flaps into place?
    amazon.com link »
    amazon.com link »

    those aren't the correct dies for tubular rivets...like the ones used in pinball machines...but if you can find the correct dies, no reason its should not work...

    #5 2 years ago

    That might be what the doctor ordered. 3" is probably best eh?

    #6 2 years ago

    Yup the biggest yoke you can get.

    #7 2 years ago

    The tool you listed isn't going to work unless you can find squeezer inserts to fit it....which I doubt exist. I've put many flaps on with one of these: HT-174 Hand Rivet Clincher for 1/8" Diameter Tubular Rivets. Designed to BE Used in Conjunction with A Hammer to Clinch/ROLL Tubular Rivets. (Pack of 1) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089745YZK/ref=cm_sw_r_awdo_navT_g_88G0HN0R6DWANM28PHZ1

    Just make sure you support the rivet head with a block of metal or a piece of hardwood, and use a backup washer behind it.

    #8 2 years ago

    https://www.mcmaster.com/6667A4/
    A press is way overkill unless you are doing high volume. Hammer and set tool work great.

    #10 2 years ago
    Quoted from JodyG:

    The tool you listed isn't going to work unless you can find squeezer inserts to fit it....which I doubt exist. I've put many flaps on with one of these: HT-174 Hand Rivet Clincher for 1/8" Diameter Tubular Rivets. Designed to BE Used in Conjunction with A Hammer to Clinch/ROLL Tubular Rivets. (Pack of 1) amazon.com link »
    Just make sure you support the rivet head with a block of metal or a piece of hardwood, and use a backup washer behind it.

    Perfect, I ordered one of these. The squeeze tools seem slicker, but I'm not high volume and this one won't take as much space on the shelf, so definitely willing to give it a try. Thanks! (and thanks to all who replied!)

    1 month later
    #11 2 years ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    Perfect, I ordered one of these. The squeeze tools seem slicker, but I'm not high volume and this one won't take as much space on the shelf, so definitely willing to give it a try. Thanks! (and thanks to all who replied!)

    How did that tool work out for you? I'm in the same boat you were in and just want to make sure the tool made for an easy install.

    #12 2 years ago

    i have the older version of this..........works great

    http://www.arbortime.com/

    #13 2 years ago
    Quoted from explosiveegg:

    How did that tool work out for you? I'm in the same boat you were in and just want to make sure the tool made for an easy install.

    The Hanson tool is the definitive solution for casual riveting.

    Perfect results.

    #14 2 years ago
    Quoted from zerbam:

    i have the older version of this..........works great
    http://www.arbortime.com/

    Thanks for the suggestion, I'm a little scared bringing a hammer near the new ramps, so this solution looks promising. I'll definitely reach out to them and try this product first.

    #15 2 years ago
    Quoted from explosiveegg:

    How did that tool work out for you? I'm in the same boat you were in and just want to make sure the tool made for an easy install.

    It worked ok on the first ramp. Someone mentioned that you could use a wood block to back the rivet, but that is not my experience. I found the rivet hammered into my wooden desk before expanding even a little. I then put a thin steel plate (actually a drill hole size gauge) on the desk and found I really messed it up before getting the rivet installed.

    That was for the easy ramp that went on to a flat section. The other three will be trickier. I've bought and cut some angle iron that I will put over wood as a backer. I'll wrap that in an old t-shirt or something so I don't scratch up the rivet or ramp.

    I also think it would help to have a very heavy work bench over a concrete floor rather than a desk over a wood floor, the latter (which is my setup) probably allows more of the hammer energy to go into bouncing the floor, which means less energy going into deforming the rivet

    IMG_20220121_110834198~2 (resized).jpgIMG_20220121_110834198~2 (resized).jpg
    #16 2 years ago
    Quoted from zerbam:

    i have the older version of this..........works great
    http://www.arbortime.com/

    I have something like this, but mine really sucks. Everything slips sideways long before the rivet deforms.

    16427776419057369175767589147113 (resized).jpg16427776419057369175767589147113 (resized).jpg
    #17 2 years ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    It worked ok on the first ramp. Someone mentioned that you could use a wood block to back the rivet, but that is not my experience. I found the rivet hammered into my wooden desk before expanding even a little. I then put a thin steel plate (actually a drill hole size gauge) on the desk and found I really messed it up before getting the rivet installed.
    That was for the easy ramp that went on to a flat section. The other three will be trickier. I've bought and cut some angle iron that I will put over wood as a backer. I'll wrap that in an old t-shirt or something so I don't scratch up the rivet or ramp.
    I also think it would help to have a very heavy work bench over a concrete floor rather than a desk over a wood floor, the latter (which is my setup) probably allows more of the hammer energy to go into bouncing the floor, which means less energy going into deforming the rivet[quoted image]

    Thanks for your response. I ordered the amazon one you picked up before someone mentioned the arbortime/pintonka tool. I did end up buying both the amazon riveter and the arbortime rivet press. I figured if the arbortime press doesn't work well, I'll have the amazon as a backup, and will just return it if the arbortime press works fine. If the arbortime tool fails me, I'll be sure to use the hammer tool on a concrete floor to prevent what you were experiencing.

    The twisty rivet presses are meant for softer metals. Which might be why your seeing it deform, if you're using hard steel rivets. I know the Pintonka one comes with mild steel rivets.

    #18 2 years ago

    Avoid steel rivets if you can. Nickel plated brass is the way to go, and far easier to clinch. As for the block of wood...it needs to be a very hard wood. I have a block of steel with adhesive felt on it, and they works well. You need a solid surface to work from as well. I usually just do it in my concrete garage floor.

    #19 2 years ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    It worked ok on the first ramp. Someone mentioned that you could use a wood block to back the rivet, but that is not my experience. I found the rivet hammered into my wooden desk before expanding even a little. I then put a thin steel plate (actually a drill hole size gauge) on the desk and found I really messed it up before getting the rivet installed.
    That was for the easy ramp that went on to a flat section. The other three will be trickier. I've bought and cut some angle iron that I will put over wood as a backer. I'll wrap that in an old t-shirt or something so I don't scratch up the rivet or ramp.
    I also think it would help to have a very heavy work bench over a concrete floor rather than a desk over a wood floor, the latter (which is my setup) probably allows more of the hammer energy to go into bouncing the floor, which means less energy going into deforming the rivet[quoted image]

    Riveting is not too difficult but you do need a firm smooth surface to get a clean result:

    Use only nickel plated brass rivets.

    They dont need much pressure to clinch them.

    They should only protrude 1/16" or less before pressing. Use backup washers to fill in the length or use smaller rivets. The "rule of thumb" is that the protruding part should not exceed 1/2 the diameter of the rivet.

    In our case of using 1/8" rivets, 1/16" works well enough. But I find that I get less splitting if the rivet protrudes a bit less, something like just a tiny bit more than the thickness of a backing washer.

    I generally set the rivet up and place a washer over the end to see how it looks. I dont measure anything.
    If the rivet is slightly higher than the washer, Im good to go.

    If the part is plastic and needs a washer, I place 2 washers, see how it looks, then remove the 2nd washer.

    Using washers to get the right length works beautifully for me.

    Its handy to have a helper hold bulky or wobbly items while you setup and press rivets.

    #20 2 years ago
    Quoted from JodyG:

    As for the block of wood..

    Maple Hardwood floor samples (without foam cushioning) from Home Depot work wonderfully for riveting or clamping protectors.

    They are cut into nice 4" squares and they are free.

    #21 2 years ago
    Quoted from pinballinreno:

    Riveting is not too difficult but you do need a firm smooth surface to get a clean result:

    Use only nickel plated brass rivets.
    They dont need much pressure to clinch them.
    They should only protrude 1/16" or less before pressing. Use backup washers to fill in the length or use smaller rivets. The "rule of thumb" is that the protruding part should not exceed 1/2 the diameter of the rivet.
    In our case of using 1/8" rivets, 1/16" works well enough. But I find that I get less splitting if the rivet protrudes a bit less, something like just a tiny bit more than the thickness of a backing washer.
    I generally set the rivet up and place a washer over the end to see how it looks. I dont measure anything.
    If the rivet is slightly higher than the washer, Im good to go.
    If the part is plastic and needs a washer, I place 2 washers, see how it looks, then remove the 2nd washer.
    Using washers to get the right length works beautifully for me.
    Its handy to have a helper hold bulky or wobbly items while you setup and press rivets.

    Holy crap. Maybe those are the magic words ("nickel plated brass"). I've been working with the ones I got with the pinbits pressless rivet kit, and the ones I got with the c-clamp pictured above. They're very tough so must be pure steel. I'll have a look for nickel plated brass and try again, thanks for the pro tip!

    #22 2 years ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    Holy crap. Maybe those are the magic words ("nickel plated brass"). I've been working with the ones I got with the pinbits pressless rivet kit, and the ones I got with the c-clamp pictured above. They're very tough so must be pure steel. I'll have a look for nickel plated brass and try again, thanks for the pro tip!

    Shipping might be costly to Canada but I have them. I am waiting for some sizes which are currently backordered, but the most common sizes I am well stocked in. https://rampomatic.com/collections/hardware

    #23 2 years ago
    Quoted from zerbam:

    i have the older version of this..........works great
    http://www.arbortime.com/

    This product is amazing. Thank you for the suggestion.

    This swords of fury ramp has some awkward rivet locations that the traditional hammer approach would've been difficult. It's also is not giving me any problems with the steel rivets I bought on pinball life.

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    #24 2 years ago

    Is there a typical rivet size used on pinballs? Specifically Sys11's? I'll restore my Whirlwind sometime soon which has a number of rivets needing replacing.

    #25 2 years ago
    Quoted from Flynnyfalcon:

    Is there a typical rivet size used on pinballs? Specifically Sys11's? I'll restore my Whirlwind sometime soon which has a number of rivets needing replacing.

    Couldn't find them in Australia when I was looking , but I see some now at PSPA. I went through this in 2015 when I could not find them here. Got them from Hanson Rivet in the US, diameters are 1/8" with various lengths in 1/32" increments. I purchased 6/32,7/32,8/32,11/32 and the squezeer dies to go with them.
    Cost me $50 in parts and $55 to ship.
    Don't know if you can find squeezer dies in Australia.
    https://www.hansonrivet.com/rivets/tubular-rivets/

    #26 2 years ago
    Quoted from Flynnyfalcon:

    Is there a typical rivet size used on pinballs? Specifically Sys11's? I'll restore my Whirlwind sometime soon which has a number of rivets needing replacing.

    On my Swords of Fury ramps and plastics I'm mainly using 3/16" and 5/32" lengths.

    If you have a manual you could look up the size by part number here (https://www.pinballlife.com/semi-tubular-rivet.html):
    Williams/Bally reference numbers:
    1/8" - 07-6688-16, 07-6688-16N, & 07-6697-2
    5/32" - 07-6688-17, 07-6688-17N, & 07-6697-3
    3/16" - 07-6688-18, 07-6688-18N, & 07-6697-4
    7/32" - 07-6688-19, 07-6688-19A, & 07-6688-19N
    1/4" - 07-6688-20 & 07-6688-20N
    9/32" - 07-6688-21 & 07-6688-21N
    1/2" - 07-6688-26
    9/16" - 07-6688-27

    #27 2 years ago
    Quoted from zerbam:

    i have the older version of this..........works great
    http://www.arbortime.com/

    This looks like better quality than what I have, and has great reviews. I just ordered one, hopefully it will help me be a riveting fool (instead of just a fool).

    2 weeks later
    #28 2 years ago

    Update: the pintonka clamp/press from arbortime arrived and it's awesome! They provide a guarantee with a test piece, a penny with a hole and an appropriately sized rivet. It works so well! The alignment is great, and there's hardly any play. Clinching was a cinch!

    IMG_20220209_085750459 (resized).jpgIMG_20220209_085750459 (resized).jpgIMG_20220209_085801337 (resized).jpgIMG_20220209_085801337 (resized).jpgIMG_20220209_085840394 (resized).jpgIMG_20220209_085840394 (resized).jpg
    #29 2 years ago
    Quoted from zerbam:

    i have the older version of this..........works great
    http://www.arbortime.com/

    Just ordered one for my self.

    Thanks,

    #30 2 years ago

    Yup. I’ve had one for a few years. Love mine!!!

    #31 2 years ago

    Complete rivet noob here. I want to replace a stand up target face on my Joker Poker. I don't foresee having to rivet often so I want to get away with the most inexpensive method as possible and the rollover punch that pinballinreno posted about seems to be the way. What will I need to get to accomplish this?

    Also, what is the best way to remove the old rivet/target face. Drill it out?

    #32 2 years ago
    Quoted from FatPanda:

    Complete rivet noob here. I want to replace a stand up target face on my Joker Poker. I don't foresee having to rivet often so I want to get away with the most inexpensive method as possible and the rollover punch that pinballinreno posted about seems to be the way. What will I need to get to accomplish this?
    Also, what is the best way to remove the old rivet/target face. Drill it out?

    Using that method you'll need the rollover punch, an appropriately sized rivet (ideally made of nickel plated brass), and a hammer.

    You'll need to use a 1/8 in drill bit to drill out the old rivet.

    #33 2 years ago
    Quoted from explosiveegg:

    Using that method you'll need the rollover punch, an appropriately sized rivet (ideally made of nickel plated brass), and a hammer.
    You'll need to use a 1/8 in drill bit to drill out the old rivet.

    Im using a 3/16" drill bit, either in a drill motor if a hand vice (bit holder). It doesnt take much, or many turns at all.

    I no longer drill thru the rivets.

    Instead I just thin down the rivet flange to paper thinness.

    If you use a brand new bit 3/16" or 1/4", you can use it to carve the flange down a bit by hand even.

    Then push the rivet out with a 1/16" harbor freight pin pinch over a 1/4" socket on an extention in my vice as a "catcher".

    Generally you need just a light tap with a hammer to get them to push out.

    The thinned down flange of soft brass, "folds" around the tool and pushes thru the hole.

    A 1/4" hole in a piece of hard wood would accomplish the same think I think.

    This avoids the spinning rivet problem which melts plastics etc.

    In metal parts you need very little thinning down to pop the rivet thru, sometimes none at all.

    This method is 10 times faster and easier on the parts.

    #35 2 years ago
    Quoted from FatPanda:

    Ok, so a set like this would work
    amazon.com link »

    Those are for roll pins.

    You're trying to do a tubular rivet. https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B089745YZK

    #36 2 years ago
    Quoted from explosiveegg:

    Those are for roll pins.
    You're trying to do a tubular rivet. amazon.com link »

    Ok glad I asked. Will this work? $6 vs $30
    https://smile.amazon.com/Prime-Line-Products-3740-Balance-Setting/dp/B00DPM6WDE/ref=sr_1_7

    #37 2 years ago
    Quoted from FatPanda:

    Ok glad I asked. Will this work? $6 vs $30
    amazon.com link »

    The bottom of the rivet should roll around and make a curve. This tools appears to be flat and would just flatten the bottom.

    It's definitely not the right tool for the job, but you might be able to get it to work for you.

    People in the comments said they made it work for a 1/8 in rivet.

    #38 2 years ago
    Quoted from FatPanda:

    Ok glad I asked. Will this work? $6 vs $30
    amazon.com link »

    Most people buy the hanson hand clincher. It works reliably.

    the gunsmith punches look pretty good for roll pins and rivet removal. My preference is the flat ended "pin punch" though, you can use then for a lot of things, even pounding out dents etc.

    To set a rivet, you can widen the end of the tube with a fat center punch:

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein-Tools-4-1-4-in-x-1-4-in-Center-Punch-66310/206377455?source=shoppingads&locale=en-US

    Then strike it down with a flat hammer. A dull drill bit would probably work. Brass is pretty forgiving.

    This method works pretty good if you can get the rivet flange past 45 degrees with a fat punch.

    You dont really need a lot of exotic tools if its only a couple rivets.

    #39 2 years ago
    Quoted from pinballinreno:

    You dont really need a lot of exotic tools if its only a couple rivets.

    Yeah, that's why I'm trying to find something cheap or something that will work. I'm sure I'll use it more if I have it, but for right now, it'll only be the one standup target face that I'll be replacing.

    #40 2 years ago
    Quoted from FatPanda:

    Yeah, that's why I'm trying to find something cheap or something that will work. I'm sure I'll use it more if I have it, but for right now, it'll only be the one standup target face that I'll be replacing.

    I would just use the fat old center punch and a hammer.

    Its been done this way for years on casual repairs.

    Nickel plated brass rivets are more forgiving than steel ones.

    #41 2 years ago
    Quoted from pinballinreno:

    I would just use the fat old center punch and a hammer.
    Its been done this way for years on casual repairs.
    Nickel plated brass rivets are more forgiving than steel ones.

    That will work for me!

    PBR says the target face will come with 1 rivet...so if I muck it up, I'll be SOL.

    Would these rivets work for extras?
    https://smile.amazon.com/uxcell-Nickel-Plated-Semi-Tubular-Rivets/dp/B017ONCMH4/ref=sr_1_30

    thanks again for answering. From someone that only knows the existence of rivets but has never actually had to fasten anything, there's a lot of stuff out there to make it confusing.

    #42 2 years ago
    Quoted from FatPanda:

    That will work for me!
    PBR says the target face will come with 1 rivet...so if I muck it up, I'll be SOL.
    Would these rivets work for extras?
    amazon.com link »
    thanks again for answering. From someone that only knows the existence of rivets but has never actually had to fasten anything, there's a lot of stuff out there to make it confusing.

    PBR sells extras. I had them throw 20 extra in last time I ordered faces.

    #43 2 years ago
    Quoted from BorgDog:

    PBR sells extras. I had them throw 20 extra in last time I ordered faces.

    Awesome. I'll have to add that into my order.

    #44 2 years ago

    That link is going to all kinds of various hardware for me. What you're looking for are "tubular" rivets. They look like a short stubby shiny nail with a hollow shaft. 1/8" are what you'll use for pinball stuff. The correct length will vary, depending on the thickness of what you're working with. Probably somewhere between 5/32 and 7/32 for ramps, plastics, and things like that. I'd get an assortment of sizes just to be safe, they're pretty cheap.

    totally tubular (resized).pngtotally tubular (resized).png
    #46 2 years ago

    After 23 years of rivet intimidation i bought the pintonka. I cant believe how easy it is to use. I am revisiting all my games with partially installed new plastic sets.

    #47 2 years ago
    Quoted from Astill:

    After 23 years of rivet intimidation i bought the pintonka. I cant believe how easy it is to use. I am revisiting all my games with partially installed new plastic sets.

    The new rev 2, pintonka is rock solid.

    The older one works well enough, but flexes a bit if you have to tighten down it a lot.

    #49 2 years ago

    Received my Pintoka yesterday and will be using it this weekend. Looks promising........

    2 months later
    #50 1 year ago

    Just got my Pintonka, dang this thing is sweet, highly recommend!

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