(Topic ID: 28788)

Worst hack/repair you ever saw.


By mcclad

7 years ago



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    There are 2587 posts in this topic. You are on page 50 of 52.
    #2451 54 days ago
    Quoted from Coindork:

    I picked up a Cyclone a couple years ago like this where the legs were drilled out and attached with drywall screws.

    *Ouch* And drywall screws are small and on the brittle side.

    #2452 53 days ago

    Bally Strikes and Spares I'm currently restoring....

    How about that ground mod!

    hack_01 (resized).jpg
    18
    #2453 52 days ago

    While not a hack, this falls into the WTF category.

    Does your long power cord bother you? Just tie it into a braid to shorten it. Paragon I picked up today.

    DSCN6658 (resized).JPG
    #2454 51 days ago

    Is it a "worst" hack if it's clean and works well enough that it lasted X years before you get it, and then even you yourself forget about it for a while?

    I bought a Time Fantasy a couple years ago. It had a few issues, but GI wasn't one of them. Yet here's what greeted me:

    20200217_190018 (resized).jpg

    I don't know what I like more: the beefy (but dissimilar gauge) wiring for the all-in-one splice... or the use of 9V battery pads as connectors!

    I reduced amp draw by switching to LEDs and over two years it's been solid stable and hasn't gotten any worse. So I guess it gets a pass? But I've decided to replace it before bringing the game to a 3-day show.

    #2455 51 days ago
    Quoted from tomdrum:

    While not a hack, this falls into the WTF category.
    Does your long power cord bother you? Just tie it into a braid to shorten it. Paragon I picked up today.[quoted image]

    That is impressive. I've never seen anyone do that before on a power cord, lol

    #2456 51 days ago
    Quoted from goingincirclez:

    I don't know what I like more: the beefy (but dissimilar gauge) wiring for the all-in-one splice... or the use of 9V battery pads as connectors!
    I reduced amp draw by switching to LEDs and over two years it's been solid stable and hasn't gotten any worse. So I guess it gets a pass? But I've decided to replace it before bringing the game to a 3-day show.

    9 volt battery terminals!? I guess when the pressure is on you use what you have on hand but to leave exposed terminals floating around is asking for trouble, good thinking to change it and make a proper repair!

    #2457 51 days ago
    Quoted from tomdrum:

    While not a hack, this falls into the WTF category.
    Does your long power cord bother you? Just tie it into a braid to shorten it. Paragon I picked up today.[quoted image]

    I'm guessing this was owned by a sailor. My grandfather was a Navy man and did this all the time.

    #2458 51 days ago
    Quoted from 72Devilz:

    9 volt battery terminals!? I guess when the pressure is on you use what you have on hand but to leave exposed terminals floating around is asking for trouble, good thinking to change it and make a proper repair!

    I hear you but in "defense" of the hack, the lead wires soldered to the PSU connector are pretty thick and stiff (giggity) so it doesn't move like, at all. In that regard it's not much different from any other exposed prong, clip, connector, or trace in the backbox. I was more intrigued to think a 9V battery pad could handle that much current, but on closer look I suppose there's no reason it wouldn't...

    ...so I guess I should be glad they still improvised a solid connector at all!

    #2459 51 days ago
    Quoted from ViriiGuy:

    I'm guessing this was owned by a sailor. My grandfather was a Navy man and did this all the time.

    After untying the 1st 3 loops , the rest just pulled straight out, not knotted. Somebody knew what they were doing. After inspecting the cord, it's solid with no damage.

    #2460 51 days ago
    Quoted from tomdrum:

    After untying the 1st 3 loops , the rest just pulled straight out, not knotted. Somebody knew what they were doing. After inspecting the cord, it's solid with no damage.

    It’s actually a way of storing cords so they don’t get tangled. We did it when I was in construction when I was younger. It works really well with very long cords. Don’t do what the guy in the video does and tie the cord in the middle with a tight knot. Just loop it. It’s also easier to plug the male and female together to find the middle.

    #2461 51 days ago
    Quoted from Murphdom:

    It’s actually a way of storing cords so they don’t get tangled. We did it when I was in construction when I was younger. It works really well with very long cords. Don’t do what the guy in the video does and tie the cord in the middle with a tight knot. Just loop it. It’s also easier to plug the male and female together to find the middle.

    I bought a machine like that from a guy once... I think his name was Eddy? Eddy Current?

    Har. Electrician joke. That said, as a former stagehand and current construction electrician, this is a lousy way to coil. Watch this guy coil a cable. It's the only right way to do it, and after one of my new apprentices learns how to sweep, this is what they move on to next. Once they master this, then the more interesting work can begin.

    #2462 51 days ago
    Quoted from semicolin:

    I bought a machine like that from a guy once... I think his name was Eddy? Eddy Current?
    Har. Electrician joke. That said, as a former stagehand and current construction electrician, this is a lousy way to coil. Watch this guy coil a cable. It's the only right way to do it, and after one of my new apprentices learns how to sweep, this is what they move on to next. Once they master this, then the more interesting work can begin.

    Gigging musician for over 20 years and electrician for over 10, I support this message.

    #2463 51 days ago
    Quoted from semicolin:

    I bought a machine like that from a guy once... I think his name was Eddy? Eddy Current?
    Har. Electrician joke. That said, as a former stagehand and current construction electrician, this is a lousy way to coil. Watch this guy coil a cable. It's the only right way to do it, and after one of my new apprentices learns how to sweep, this is what they move on to next. Once they master this, then the more interesting work can begin.

    I was just explaining the method. If you came over you wouldn’t find a single cord like that here. We were just made to do it that way at that job I had at the time. I agree with you guys

    #2464 51 days ago
    Quoted from Shredso:

    Gigging musician for over 20 years and electrician for over 10, I support this message.

    Interesting. I always wrap them around my elbow to my shoulder, but i'm going to try this.

    #2465 51 days ago
    Quoted from Methos:

    Interesting. I always wrap them around my elbow to my shoulder, but i'm going to try this.

    With that method, you'll get ripples and twists in the cable.

    With a proper coiling method, the cable will be perfectly straight and flat when uncoiled, even if it's been coiled up for a long period of time.

    #2466 51 days ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    With that method, you'll get ripples and twists in the cable.
    With a proper coiling method, the cable will be perfectly straight and flat when uncoiled, even if it's been coiled up for a long period of time.

    I have a friend who gets frustrated with me because I complain and ask him NOT to help with cords when he is helping, for this same reason. I replaced an extension cord that I use indoors a lot after he coiled it up a couple times and got twists all in it....I think he thought I was nuts with my OCD (probably am, lol).

    Between boating a little when I was younger and handling lines in auto body shops, I have a tendency to get kind of anal about kinks and twists in lines. Even things like video game controllers. I always coiled my cables; not wrapped around.

    #2467 51 days ago
    Quoted from pacmanretro:

    I have a friend who gets frustrated with me because I complain and ask him NOT to help with cords when he is helping, for this same reason. I replaced an extension cord that I use indoors a lot after he coiled it up a couple times and got twists all in it....I think he thought I was nuts with my OCD (probably am, lol).
    Between boating a little when I was younger and handling lines in auto body shops, I have a tendency to get kind of anal about kinks and twists in lines. Even things like video game controllers. I always coiled my cables; not wrapped around.

    My wife thinks I’m nuts with my tools. I’m glad I’m not the only one who is very particular over them.

    #2468 50 days ago

    When I was reading the 30 pages or whatever I had to catch up with here, someone mentioned applying a bunch of red "Cleveland Coin" padlock tags to boards they worked on back in the day....

    Well I've acquired a mild Blackout project. It works, but none of its boards are original and all of them (even the displays!) are mismatched serial numbers... Except the speech & sound pair... And look what they have:

    20200219_205428 (resized).jpg

    I thought someone would get a kick out of that. As a student / enthusiast for history, I even left them in place when I serviced the board...
    20200219_214829 (resized).jpg

    #2469 50 days ago
    Quoted from tomdrum:

    While not a hack, this falls into the WTF category.
    Does your long power cord bother you? Just tie it into a braid to shorten it. Paragon I picked up today.[quoted image]

    This is not uncommon to see larger vessels do this with their dock lines provided the cap or mates know how to do it. It is complimentary to coiling up dock lines so they are not messy dockside

    #2470 50 days ago
    Quoted from statictrance:

    So that's why my coins are jamming... Ha.[quoted image][quoted image]

    It took a while for me to realize that these are just being held on with wires lol. So they had none of the hardware for the mechs so they just held it in with wires... nice.

    Quoted from ViriiGuy:

    Same. I have, with clients permission, just super glued these back on as well. Bad design, they just don't last long. Chuck an LED in there and glue it together.

    I have a City Slicker and mine were very clean, and after reinstalling they broke during the first few test plays. They’re so brittle and tiny, they can’t handle the stress after all these years. I think the super glue method makes the most sense

    Quoted from sohchx:

    Cuz those EM's generate a ton of heat inside the head.[quoted image]

    If that’s a playmatic that’s how they come. My Last Lap has that heat vent in the top from the factory. I guess Playmatic thought heat was a huge issue an put big metal vents on the top of the heads.

    #2471 50 days ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    At least there's no artwork in that spot. It could be filled and painted without being too obvious.

    exactly this. they should have drilled the hole out larger, filled it with a section of dowel rod, sanded it flush, repainted the black and then drilled a new [centered] hole to fix it correctly

    yes, it would have taken a bit longer but the results would have been 10x better

    #2472 50 days ago
    Quoted from j_m_:

    exactly this. they should have drilled the hole out larger, filled it with a section of dowel rod, sanded it flush, repainted the black and then drilled a new [centered] hole to fix it correctly
    yes, it would have taken a bit longer but the results would have been 10x better

    I still think id prefer to have just added a tnut under the original hole and change that center post to one with a matching machine threaded base instead of just one threaded for wood.

    #2473 50 days ago
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    #2474 50 days ago
    Quoted from j_m_:

    they should have drilled the hole out larger

    Unless you just mean drill a clean hole, there are dowels of various sizes available. Or you could also just use a wood filler. A dowel by itself won't be the finishing step, anyway.

    #2475 50 days ago

    Okay, that one's mine & the pics are in reverse order.
    That connector, A1J1, needed re-pinning as it was causing resets & A2J2 to get real hot. I read on here about using a jeweler's screwdriver to release the tang. Tried putting it under the pin & the corner of the housing snapped off. Before I started, while I was looking for anything else to use, I found the rubber bands in my toolbox. They hold the broccoli bunches & I guess I figured the may come in handy.

    #2476 50 days ago

    Awesome Solution

    #2477 50 days ago
    Quoted from Topher5000:

    I read on here about using a jeweler's screwdriver to release the tang.

    While that can work for some connector styles where the tang is exposed, screwdrivers are too big for this style of connector.

    You'll want this extraction tool: https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=11-03-0016

    #2478 50 days ago
    Quoted from Topher5000:

    Okay, that one's mine & the pics are in reverse order.
    That connector, A1J1, needed re-pinning as it was causing resets & A2J2 to get real hot. I read on here about using a jeweler's screwdriver to release the tang. Tried putting it under the pin & the corner of the housing snapped off. Before I started, while I was looking for anything else to use, I found the rubber bands in my toolbox. They hold the broccoli bunches & I guess I figured the may come in handy.

    Nice temporary! I purchased these recently to remove a number of pins on various types of equipment and there are a couple in the set that work perfect for releasing pins on Gottlieb, Williams and Bally plugs. amazon.com link »

    #2479 50 days ago
    Quoted from 72Devilz:

    Nice temporary! I purchased these recently to remove a number of pins on various types of equipment and there are a couple in the set that work perfect for releasing pins on Gottlieb, Williams and Bally plugs. amazon.com link »

    I use this exact same set daily in my repair business.

    #2480 49 days ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    While that can work for some connector styles where the tang is exposed, screwdrivers are too big for this style of connector.
    You'll want this extraction tool: https://www.greatplainselectronics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=11-03-0016

    The rubber band fit perfectly. I used the broken bit & after getting the pin positioned correctly, it never reset.
    I'll have to order the housing from g-p-e since the edge connectors are obsolete. I'll also get the housings for the P.S. Does this work on those? I'm going to take the P.S. to the local electronic shop, Nutech, & have the pins replaced, but I'm leaning towards that terminal removal kit 72devilz limked to.

    17
    #2481 49 days ago

    No connectors on hand? Just raid your EM parts bin!

    IMG_20200220_145107421 (resized).jpgIMG_20200221_100901884 (resized).jpg
    #2482 49 days ago
    Quoted from Bakerman:

    No connectors on hand? Just raid your EM parts bin!

    Geez that’s a lot of work! That must have taken them longer to wire up that Jones plug, then to just wait for the right connector to come in.

    #2483 49 days ago
    Quoted from bicyclenut:

    That must have taken them longer to wire up that Jones plug, then to just wait for the right connector to come in.

    I'm totally the type that *can't wait* for parts to arrive, and would very seriously consider doing something this just to see if it works while I'm killing time waiting for them...

    ...though there's easier, more readily reversible ways of approaching it than that!

    #2484 49 days ago
    Quoted from frunch:

    I'm totally the type that *can't wait* for parts to arrive

    oh I know the feeling

    29
    #2485 48 days ago

    Just making sure I brought all my screwdrivers with me.

    IMG_20200214_182727001.jpg
    #2486 48 days ago

    Burt connectors , no problem

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    #2487 48 days ago
    Quoted from FunkyFreshWalrus:

    Just making sure I brought all my screwdrivers with me.[quoted image]

    No one is going to steal it in a hurry.

    #2488 47 days ago
    Quoted from FunkyFreshWalrus:

    Just making sure I brought all my screwdrivers with me.[quoted image]

    Real men of genius know you only need a flathead for all 3... (yes, even the square one... don't ask how I know )

    #2489 46 days ago

    Fun Fact: The Square Head is called a "Robertson" drive.

    #2490 46 days ago
    Quoted from Redfive05:

    Fun Fact: The Square Head is called a "Robertson" drive.

    More fun facts.
    It is prevalent in Canada, where it was invented. It is also dang near the perfect screw head, as it does not strip, when you use a Robertson screwdriver with it.

    #2491 44 days ago
    Quoted from ViriiGuy:

    More fun facts.
    It is prevalent in Canada, where it was invented. It is also dang near the perfect screw head, as it does not strip, when you use a Robertson screwdriver with it.

    I don't know about that. I had a stainless version of those for my deck. they were a pain in the @ss to remove when I re-did the deck. I replaced them with star headed screws, which do not strip.

    #2492 44 days ago
    Quoted from j_m_:

    I don't know about that. I had a stainless version of those for my deck. they were a pain in the @ss to remove when I re-did the deck. I replaced them with star headed screws, which do not strip.

    I agree, I'm not a fan of the square drive. In theory, they should never strip. In reality, I've seen a ton of them strip out. Yes, using the right bit.

    #2493 44 days ago

    Interesting. The only one I have ever seen strip out, was because the person was using a flat head to remove it.

    Must have been some soft metal!

    #2494 44 days ago
    Quoted from ViriiGuy:

    Interesting. The only one I have ever seen strip out, was because the person was using a flat head to remove it.
    Must have been some soft metal!

    Living in Canada, Robertson is pretty much the only option we have...yes, they can strip but nearly always from an incorrect or stripped bit. They are miles ahead of flat head, but philips is great too.

    #2495 44 days ago
    Quoted from ViriiGuy:

    More fun facts.
    It is prevalent in Canada, where it was invented. It is also dang near the perfect screw head, as it does not strip, when you use a Robertson screwdriver with it.

    Saw this video a couple weeks ago and found it interesting:

    #2496 44 days ago

    I'm a proponent of torx simply for their cam-in properties, and I don't recall ever stripping one.

    #2497 44 days ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    Saw this video a couple weeks ago and found it interesting:

    That is a GREAT video!! I learned all about the Robertsons when I lived in Nova Scotia for a Decade, running a computer store. I actually use them for ALL of my wood projects here in TN, still today.

    Quoted from Grandnational007:

    I'm a proponent of torx simply for their cam-in properties, and I don't recall ever stripping one.

    I have actually broken a few Torx bits and stripped a few of the screws. Again, I blame soft metals.

    #2498 44 days ago
    Quoted from Aquapin:Living in Canada, Robertson is pretty much the only option we have...yes, they can strip but nearly always from an incorrect or stripped bit. They are miles ahead of flat head, but philips is great too.

    I see Robertson screws all the time during my restorations since I live in Canada and it bugs the shit outta me.... Friends don't let friends use Robertson screws in their pinball machines.

    #2499 44 days ago

    As an electrician I've always liked the Robertson head. Most of our receptacles and panelboards, circuit breakers, etc. are a combination of Robertson, flathead and Phillips. Most of the guys in the field don't even realize it or have the driver in their tool bag. More recently some of the 10 in 1 screwdrivers are including it. I find it quicker, less likely to strip, and safer. Thanks for the video!

    #2500 44 days ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    Saw this video a couple weeks ago and found it interesting:

    I found this quite fascinating! Thanks for sharing. I have rarely come across a Robertson screw, but oddly enough learned all about Torx when I began to have to work on my '87 Camaro which was assembled in Canada!

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