(Topic ID: 335247)

worst auction / not great PR

By OGpinball

1 year ago


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  • 72 posts
  • 26 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by Miguel351
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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There are 72 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.
#51 1 year ago
Quoted from SantaEatsCheese:

Anyone here a former NCAA student athlete? I'm not, but I was an official NCAA student tutor paid by the NCAA to tutor their athletes in college (looked great on a resume). Let me let you in on a little secret. The NCAA student athletes and their degrees by and large are a joke. Do you know what my primary duties were as a tutor? Reading students their assignments. Not even helping with homework but reading to them. NCAA athletes with below a certain GPA were required to attend so much tutoring per week, but many just did not care at all about school. I refused to do their work for them, but if the athletes are struggling to even read a 100 level college textbook and answer basic questions I don't know what to tell you. Some would literally just lie down and nap during tutoring sessions. I was the only tutor they had that had taken any anthropology courses, which somehow qualified me to tutor cultural anthropology. This was high school level stuff at best and their were students graduating that literally could not read a single chapter in their text books and even worse would not stay awake to have it read to them... yet they still graduated.
In my personal opinion college degrees are ranked from high to low on the following levels.
1. Traditional brick and mortar school
2. Online Degree
3. "University of Phoenix"
4. Earn college credit for real life experience!
5. Coney Island College (Reference: )
6. Official NCAA student athlete with degree from brick and mortar school
No insult meant to anyone... excepting NCAA student athletes and their governing organization. I am sure there are some college athletes that legitimately put forward the effort to study and learn, but the utter contempt I saw towards learning from people with full ride scholarships was deplorable.

During my time in college, in a number of my GE courses, I had a few student athletes in those classes. With the exception of a couple guys(who some of you have seen over the years commenting on NFL games), I can count on one hand how many times I saw those athletes in class all semester, literally. I remember in one of my English classes getting all excited when I recognized one of the stars of the basketball team on the first day of class. Thought it'd be cool to get to know the guy over the fall semester, i.e. when basketball isn't even really played that much. That was the ONLY time I ever saw him in class.

Couldn't agree much more with your post. I'm really curious what the actual percentage of graduating athletes is who actually do the work, get good grades, and become functioning members of the workforce when their dreams of professional sports falls through.

#52 1 year ago
Quoted from SantaEatsCheese:

Anyone here a former NCAA student athlete? I'm not, but I was an official NCAA student tutor paid by the NCAA to tutor their athletes in college (looked great on a resume). Let me let you in on a little secret. The NCAA student athletes and their degrees by and large are a joke. Do you know what my primary duties were as a tutor? Reading students their assignments. Not even helping with homework but reading to them. NCAA athletes with below a certain GPA were required to attend so much tutoring per week, but many just did not care at all about school. I refused to do their work for them, but if the athletes are struggling to even read a 100 level college textbook and answer basic questions I don't know what to tell you. Some would literally just lie down and nap during tutoring sessions. I was the only tutor they had that had taken any anthropology courses, which somehow qualified me to tutor cultural anthropology. This was high school level stuff at best and their were students graduating that literally could not read a single chapter in their text books and even worse would not stay awake to have it read to them... yet they still graduated.

You’re painting “NCAA student” athletes with a pretty broad brush here. What you experienced was likely what happens at Power 5 conferences in revenue generating sports by their most under-qualified (academically) top recruits. We’re talking football, basketball, maybe baseball, and maybe a handful of individuals in other sports who may win NCAA individual titles or garner national attention.

I lived the glorious life of an NCAA athlete- I ran cross country and track at a D1 mid major conference. I’m sure you can imagine my teammates and I living in luxury despite our throngs of fans seeking autographs. Obviously, neither I nor my teammates received any assistance that you described. My friends who swam, played tennis, soccer, rowed, etc., received none either.
Division 2 and Division 3 athletes likely receive no preferential treatment either.
I have a friend who was an NCAA champion rower at an Ivy (where they don’t even give scholarships). Think he received academic tutoring? My teammate who was on a (nearly) full ride received no tutoring.

So, while I think what you’ve described certainly happens with SOME of the athletes we saw in March Madness and in bowl games, whose school benefit financially from their performances, there are probably 10s of thousands of others who are NCAA athletes experiencing the rigor of academics and athletics without assistance. I’d hate to think you see “athlete” on a resume and put them all on the same basket.

#54 1 year ago
Quoted from shirkle:

You’re painting “NCAA student” athletes with a pretty broad brush here. What you experienced was likely what happens at Power 5 conferences in revenue generating sports by their most under-qualified (academically) top recruits. We’re talking football, basketball, maybe baseball, and maybe a handful of individuals in other sports who may win NCAA individual titles or garner national attention.
I lived the glorious life of an NCAA athlete- I ran cross country and track at a D1 mid major conference. I’m sure you can imagine my teammates and I living in luxury despite our throngs of fans seeking autographs. Obviously, neither I nor my teammates received any assistance that you described. My friends who swam, played tennis, soccer, rowed, etc., received none either.
Division 2 and Division 3 athletes likely receive no preferential treatment either.
I have a friend who was an NCAA champion rower at an Ivy (where they don’t even give scholarships). Think he received academic tutoring? My teammate who was on a (nearly) full ride received no tutoring.
So, while I think what you’ve described certainly happens with SOME of the athletes we saw in March Madness and in bowl games, whose school benefit financially from their performances, there are probably 10s of thousands of others who are NCAA athletes experiencing the rigor of academics and athletics without assistance. I’d hate to think you see “athlete” on a resume and put them all on the same basket.

Could be, this was at Texas Tech with my first Bachelor's circa 2004-2006 so things may have changed or have been different than before. However, in my personal experience the NCAA student athlete graduate with a communications degree didn't do the work to earn it. I wouldn't throw out a NCAA student athlete resume, but I would ask them the same questions as anyone else.

#55 1 year ago
Quoted from SantaEatsCheese:Could be, this was at Texas Tech with my first Bachelor's circa 2004-2006 so things may have changed or have been different than before. However, in my personal experience the NCAA student athlete graduate with a communications degree didn't do the work to earn it. I wouldn't throw out a NCAA student athlete resume, but I would ask them the same questions as anyone else.

The big time athletes aren't there to get a college education. They have been brought there to win games.

The whole thing is stupid. The big time football teams/basketball teams should just be spun off from the schools and made professional. Would make life easier for everybody.

Why are we still continuing the silly "student athlete" charade? It's not 1912 anymore.

#56 1 year ago

Wait. you mean the bigtime UofM players in this town don't really meet the academic requirements to attend a top 10 university?!?

Phew, what would I do without threads like this?

#57 1 year ago

Not going to lie, I don't follow college sports but do Stern on Twitter. I was a little confused why they were doing a charity auction for somebody who was drafted. I figured something happened in his life I didn't know about, or maybe it was going for some charity they represented, but didn't really care and moved on.

I agree that this is gross.

#58 1 year ago
Quoted from thekiyote:

Not going to lie, I don't follow college sports but do Stern on Twitter. I was a little confused why they were doing a charity auction for somebody who was drafted. I figured something happened in his life I didn't know about, or maybe it was going for some charity they represented, but didn't really care and moved on.
I agree that this is gross.

But you have completely misunderstood what the event benefits. It has nothing to do with professional players.

#59 1 year ago

For historical on this this Thread.
Game 1 sold for $14,600.00 plus buyers prem.
Game 2 sold for $13,300.00 plus buyers prem.

The fund profit would be these 2 prices minus buyers premium.

#60 1 year ago
Quoted from chuckwurt:

But you have completely misunderstood what the event benefits. It has nothing to do with professional players.

perception is everything in marketing

#61 1 year ago

Purely a "creative" NIL play. Frankly, it's better than what most programs are doing right now. At least there is an exchange of goods rather than the typical "give me some of your money so we can pay to get better players into our program". I'm a Kansas alum and there are three different NIL collectives that constantly harass me for money because I've donated a decent amount of money to the athletic program.

#62 1 year ago
Quoted from BMore-Pinball:

perception is everything in marketing

I won’t lie, I have zero clue what an NIL is, even after googling it.

When I first saw this post from Stern on Twitter, I saw the word “benefit” and thought this was some kind of charity or at the very least the athletic program, though I didn’t know why they were listing names of athletes who were graduating.

After hearing the complaints here, I assumed this was just money being paid to those athletes, which I thought wasn’t allowed in college sports, but I really don’t have a strong opinion on, outside of the auction using language that is typically used for charities, which I think is wrong.

After looking up NIL, and seeing a whole bunch of stuff about collectives, agents, alumni groups, recruiting and so on, I’m back to not knowing what is going on.

Just an outsiders view of this. I normally don’t follow this stuff, it just came up following pinball stuff.

#63 1 year ago

Players in college can now work out deals to get paid for colleges using their name, image, or likeness for marketing purposes. This was not legal until recently and players were not allowed to be paid any money while in college for this stuff.

#64 1 year ago
Quoted from chuckwurt:

Players in college can now work out deals to get paid for colleges using their name, image, or likeness for marketing purposes. This was not legal until recently and players were not allowed to be paid any money while in college for this stuff.

Okay, and I take it schools are collecting money specifically to pay their players?

That seems kinda dumb to donate to that, but at least with this one you’re getting a pinball machine for your donation and one associated with the team.

As an outsider, I still don’t like the language but I guess someone who would actually donate would know what all this meant, so…. *shrug*

#65 1 year ago
Quoted from thekiyote:

...
That seems kinda dumb to donate to that...

Well it is if you're not routing for the Iliini

#66 1 year ago
Quoted from thekiyote:

Okay, and I take it schools are collecting money specifically to pay their players?

The school might not have anything to do with it. Could be a car dealership, grocery store, HVAC company. Just think of all the endorsements professional players get.

These “collectives” are donors or fans that have willingly contributed to a pool of funds to help pay players. These collectives are separate entities and can raise money however they want.

#67 1 year ago
Quoted from thekiyote:

As an outsider, I still don’t like the language but I guess someone who would actually donate would know what all this meant, so…. *shrug*

Bingo. Those that understand the language don’t have issue with it, hence their contribution.

#68 1 year ago
Quoted from thekiyote:

Okay, and I take it schools are collecting money specifically to pay their players?
That seems kinda dumb to donate to that, but at least with this one you’re getting a pinball machine for your donation and one associated with the team.
As an outsider, I still don’t like the language but I guess someone who would actually donate would know what all this meant, so…. *shrug*

Think of it like weed. For a long time it was illegal with severe consequences. Then weed became legal if it was for “medicinal” purposes and you had a doctors prescription. Finally, people are saying, enough of the medical weed facade. And now it is becoming legal “recreationally”. College athletics is just recently entering the “medicinal” stage of legality with the facade of NIL.

If this were a true NIL, stern would be using these athletes in their advertising of pinball machines. These football players would be making appearances at trade shows or tournaments. The whole thing is a joke.

#69 1 year ago
Quoted from chuckwurt:

The school might not have anything to do with it. Could be a car dealership, grocery store, HVAC company. Just think of all the endorsements professional players get.
These “collectives” are donors or fans that have willingly contributed to a pool of funds to help pay players. These collectives are separate entities and can raise money however they want.

If I’m hiring an athlete for an endorsement, that’s me doing it for marketing reasons. I’m expecting (whether or not I actually get it) to make more money by using that player’s face in my ad fan I’m paying him. I don’t see how it tracks to reach out to third parties to pay for it.

Unless you’re saying this is some kind of tip jar for college athletes, this seems like a weird way to structure it, unless it’s by fans who are trying to sneak in those tips by “endorsements” using a legal loophole?

Sorry, my goal was definitely not to derail this thread.

#70 1 year ago
Quoted from thekiyote:

If I’m hiring an athlete for an endorsement, that’s me doing it for marketing reasons. I’m expecting (whether or not I actually get it) to make more money by using that player’s face in my ad fan I’m paying him. I don’t see how it tracks to reach out to third parties to pay for it.
Unless you’re saying this is some kind of tip jar for college athletes, this seems like a weird way to structure it, unless it’s by fans who are trying to sneak in those tips by “endorsements” using a legal loophole?
Sorry, my goal was definitely not to derail this thread.

Different ways to pay players.

Endorsements

Just flat out paying them. One popular way to raise funds for these players is to create these collectives where fans and boosters and throw money into it and the school uses it to pay players. The donors get benefits for their donations too. Like being able to meet the players, discounted tickets/Merch, etc.

This auction put money into a specific collective that was going to pay those specific players.

It’s not a legal loop hole. It’s a way for the average Joe to contribute to their schools pool of funds that will help get their team’s athletes paid for their efforts.

Also, some collectives are private and aren’t associated with the school. See UK’s:
IMG_8895 (resized).jpegIMG_8895 (resized).jpeg

#71 1 year ago

My brother won a Rose Bowl ring in the 60s with UCLA. The basketball team won 10 NCAA titles in 12 years. John Wooden was brilliant, but would he have had this success without booster Sam Gilbert? I'm obviously a John Wooden fan and it's of course no. Lew Alcindor (Kareem) from Power high school. Sure. He just happened to pick UCLA.

Other boosters like the SMU pony express became almost normalized. In 2009 Ed O'Bannon sued the NCAA and EA that his likeness was being used. EA eventually payed out over 60 million in 2014. Then in June 2021 a former college football players law suit was ruled in his favor by the Supreme Court and now Name Image Likeness can be compensated.

Now boosters have a way of doing this above board for the most part. It isn't perfect in any way, but it wasn't cool that companies used individuals likenesses and profited from it without compensation. Seems at least a first step. And who doesn't like The Masters Girl who took her 15 minute's of fame and monetized it thru NIL.

20230423_075312 (resized).jpg20230423_075312 (resized).jpg
#72 1 year ago
Quoted from chuckwurt:

Different ways to pay players.
Endorsements
Just flat out paying them. One popular way to raise funds for these players is to create these collectives where fans and boosters and throw money into it and the school uses it to pay players. The donors get benefits for their donations too. Like being able to meet the players, discounted tickets/Merch, etc.
This auction put money into a specific collective that was going to pay those specific players.
It’s not a legal loop hole. It’s a way for the average Joe to contribute to their schools pool of funds that will help get their team’s athletes paid for their efforts.
Also, some collectives are private and aren’t associated with the school. See UK’s:
[quoted image]

That UK 15 Club collective sure sounds a lot like a version of OnlyFans for student athletes.

Plus, it's old name of Athletes Advantage sounds like a cheaper version of AthLead, the company that Jim co-founded on The Office.

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