Wolf's Beginner Guide to 3D Printing and Pinball

(Topic ID: 114357)

Wolf's Beginner Guide to 3D Printing and Pinball


By Wolfmarsh

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 218 posts
  • 53 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 10 months ago by mattosborn
  • Topic is favorited by 107 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 36 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    ikea_enclosure (resized).jpg
    spool rack (resized).jpg
    20160806_155559_(resized).jpg
    2016-05-26_19.03.17_(resized).jpg
    1463492459259.jpg
    4c5a6053ac8634ef1bdf8c4eefaf998911a3600f_(resized).jpg
    4fd7973bff62ec1b117fb691e21bfd373c7b6f93_(resized).jpg
    20160514_214138_(resized).jpg
    20160514_214622_(resized).jpg
    20160514_214746_(resized).jpg
    foil2_(resized).JPG
    foil1_(resized).JPG
    barrel_o_fun_(resized).jpg
    mocking_(resized).jpg
    hero-1_small.jpg
    printing_base.jpg

    There are 218 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 5.
    36
    #1 3 years ago

    There have been a lot of posts about 3D printing lately, and someone suggested it might be neat to have a little guide to 3D printing, especially how it relates to pinball.

    I'll start by saying I'm not an expert at 3D printing or modeling, so I'd love it if others could offer up their suggestions/ideas. I'll incorporate them into the post(s).

    So, let's start with the basics.

    Different 3D printing methods

    First, the most popular among home machines is "Fused Deposition Modeling" (FDM for short). FDM is where a thermoplastic filament is slightly melted, extruded through a small nozzle, and deposited in layers to build up your object. Most home printers use this method. Here is an image from wikipedia that gives the general idea. Item 1 is the extruder, Item 2 is the deposited layers of plastic, and 3 is the build platform.

    A second method, that is popular with the higher end machines, is "Selective Laser Sintering" (SLS). With SLS, a layer of powder is deposited on the build surface, then a laser melts specific areas together. The build surface lowers a fraction of a millimeter, and more powder is deposited. Repeat until the object is built. Here are a couple short videos that shows how SLS works:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=sFpSxX0SzgY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=-6ItiCbYFvI

    Buying a Printer vs Using a Service (Shapeways)

    Most home printers will print using plastic filament and FDM. Services like Shapeways can afford higher end printers that offer higher resolution with SLS.

    For most of what I do, FDM and home printing will cover it. If I need a full color print or some very fine details like screw threads, I will order from Shapeways.

    If you decide to order your own printer, I highly recommend reading the Make Guide to 3D printers.

    I personally chose to go with a Printrbot Simple Metal Kit with a Heated Bed upgrade.

    10671323_10153440084203569_301079759855727570_n (1).jpg

    At first I was skeptical that one of the lowest cost printers would fill my needs, but I've come to learn that you only really sacrifice speed and maximum build size. If a 6"x6"x6" bed meets your size needs, I can't say enough about the Printrbot Simple Metal. It's a fantastic printer.

    The Process of Printing an Object

    The easiest way to get into 3D printing without having to model your own objects is to download pre-made models. A great source for this is Thingiverse. Pinball parts are starting to be pushed up to Thingiverse, so there is a small library starting to grow there.

    For example, here is a shooter lane that swinks designed. http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:608164

    336893-i_preview_featured.jpg

    You download a .STL file of the model you want to print. It contains the geometry for the object in a language your next program can understand.

    Once you have the .STL file, you feed it to a slicing program. A slicing program takes a 3D model and cuts it into the layers you need to feed to the 3D printer. I use Slic3r.

    Here is a quick example of how it works, you can see the model on the left, and the sliced version on the right.

    Figure2_Rapid_prototyping_slicing.jpg

    Once your object has been sliced, you can generate a G-code file, which is the common language that CNC machines use.

    A G-code file looks like this:

    G1 X52.008 Y54.121 E2.04455
    G1 X51.948 Y52.484 E2.13013
    G1 X51.969 Y52.373 E2.13608
    G1 X52.042 Y50.606 E2.22844
    G1 X52.067 Y50.514 E2.23342
    G1 X52.258 Y48.934 E2.31658
    G1 X52.708 Y48.561 E2.34712
    G1 X52.998 Y48.608 E2.36247
    G1 X54.421 Y48.632 E2.43686
    G1 X54.532 Y48.659 E2.44282

    This example is a bunch of G1 commands that tell the machine to move to a specific X position, a specific Y position, and to Extrude a specific amount of filament.

    Then the G-code file gets loaded into a printer control software, and slowly fed to the printer as it prints your object.

    I use a Raspberry PI to control my printer, running a special image called OctoPi. It gives me a web interface to my printer. You can learn more about OctoPrint and OctoPi here: http://octoprint.org/download/

    If everything worked well, you get real objects from the models:

    DSC01345 (Medium).JPG

    If things don't go well, you end up with a bunch of trash plastic. It happens. I woke up from an overnight print one night with a giant spaghetti ball of filament.

    Here is a pic of some of my failures when I first started.

    10689621_10153440084268569_1708276184856761357_n (1).jpg

    I'm sure there are a lot more that need to be added to this, so I'll continue to edit as people post and offer suggestions.

    Please post if you have any questions and I'll do my best to answer it, or find the answer for you.

    Hope you are having a great new year!

    #2 3 years ago

    good stuff

    #3 3 years ago

    Great stuff. Thanks!

    #4 3 years ago

    Great info, thanks for posting wolfmarsh. Are you using ABS or PLA? The reason I'm asking is that I'm curious if PLA is clear enough that it could be used with a 3D pen to repair broken ramps. Of course adhesion would be the other issue.

    Also, any experience with 3D scanners?

    #5 3 years ago

    Great post.
    Slightly ot...I arrange for cargo from the Far East to the USA. Someday, goods that are produced overseas are going to be sent via the Internet. One could visualize large factories in the USA with massive 3d printers making everything from toys to knick knacks to whatever.
    3D printing...only now, in its earliest infancy.

    #6 3 years ago

    Added to favorite threads. Great stuff.

    #7 3 years ago
    Quoted from terryb:

    Are you using ABS or PLA?

    I use both. PLA is so much easier to print with than ABS. ABS parts have more "give" to them without breaking, so they seem to be more durable in mechanical assemblies.

    Quoted from terryb:

    The reason I'm asking is that I'm curious if PLA is clear enough that it could be used with a 3D pen to repair broken ramps. Of course adhesion would be the other issue.

    Not sure. I have a spool of crystal clear on the way, should be here in the next couple of days. It's for testing lighting with swinks's shooter lanes. What material are ramps normally made out of? I might be able to suggest a solvent mixture that would complement a plastic repair from one of the 3D pens.

    Quoted from terryb:

    Also, any experience with 3D scanners?

    Not yet. I think my next purchase will be a scanner. There are a couple $500 range ones that I've had my eye on. For example: http://cubify.com/en/Products/Sense

    Quoted from Vyzer2:

    Slightly ot...I arrange for cargo from the Far East to the USA. Someday, goods that are produced overseas are going to be sent via the Internet. One could visualize large factories in the USA with massive 3d printers making everything from toys to knick knacks to whatever.
    3D printing...only now, in its earliest infancy.

    Not OT at all! I agree with your vision. The example I usually give to people is the Sears parts desk. For years, you've been able to go to a Sears parts center and order a replacement part for a mower, etc... With 3D printing, I can totally see them selling the 3D version of the model for 1/4 the price of the real one, and it feeds directly to your printer. Order the part online, feed it to the printer, and have your part inside of an hour without ever leaving the house.

    #8 3 years ago

    I have a Lulzbot TAZ it has a build area of 11"x10"x9" and I print ABS with a 0.35 nozzle.

    I use ABS glue on glass with a heated bed. I've tried kapton, hairspray etc but ABS glue made all my warping go away.

    #9 3 years ago

    http://www.thingiverse.com/search?q=pinball&sa=

    pinball related items on thingiverse. Thanks again for starting this topic!

    #10 3 years ago

    I'm another advocate for 3D printing. I'm about 4-5 years into the hobby and I'm about to upgrade to something with better micron resolution. It's definitely a good skill to know now and even more so in the near future.

    #11 3 years ago
    Quoted from BloodyCactus:

    I use ABS glue on glass with a heated bed. I've tried kapton, hairspray etc but ABS glue made all my warping go away.

    I use the purple elmer's glue stick on Kapton with both PLA and ABS. Completely eliminated my warping. I've also broken parts in half trying to get them unstuck, lol.

    I'm jealous of your build volume. 6"x6"x6" is good for 99% of what I do, but there have been a couple opportunities where I wish I had a solid 12" in at least one axis. The printrbot seems like I could upgrade the Z to a foot or two taller and still be alright, so I may explore that.

    Quoted from pinballsmith:

    I'm another advocate for 3D printing. I'm about 4-5 years into the hobby and I'm about to upgrade to something with better micron resolution. It's definitely a good skill to know now and even more so in the near future.

    What kind of printer do you use?

    #12 3 years ago

    An early Makerbot as of now. Really want something better to minimize sanding the print lines out for casting. SLA sounds nice, but the cost of each print when factoring the cost of resin makes it unreasonable at the moment.

    #13 3 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    The printrbot seems like I could upgrade the Z to a foot or two taller and still be alright, so I may explore that.

    Ive heard issues of sagging arms on all printrbot versions, something to keep an eye on, I beleive its lesser in the metal but still something to be aware of.

    #14 3 years ago

    Rostock Max V2 for my printer here.
    Mostly been printing ABS so far, as I use it mostly for soldering jigs right now and PLA is much less heat resistant.

    -Hans

    #15 3 years ago
    Quoted from BloodyCactus:

    Ive heard issues of sagging arms on all printrbot versions, something to keep an eye on, I beleive its lesser in the metal but still something to be aware of.

    Hmmm, that's something for me to consider. Thanks for the heads up!

    #16 3 years ago
    Quoted from HHaase:

    Rostock Max V2 for my printer here.
    Mostly been printing ABS so far, as I use it mostly for soldering jigs right now and PLA is much less heat resistant.
    -Hans

    Those delta style printers are fascinating to watch. The math behind them must be pretty cool. Again, jealous of such a large build volume!

    #17 3 years ago

    Anyone want to help design and print some parts for a fee? I need a few EM game parts that are unobtainium and would be willing to provide samples/drawings to have them reproduced. I am not knowledgeable of 3d design at all.

    #18 3 years ago
    Quoted from PhilC:

    Anyone want to help design and print some parts for a fee? I need a few EM game parts that are unobtainium and would be willing to provide samples/drawings to have them reproduced. I am not knowledgeable of 3d design at all.

    I would do the same with Varkon plastics...can you even print plastics with a 3D printer?

    #19 3 years ago
    Quoted from PhilC:

    Anyone want to help design and print some parts for a fee? I need a few EM game parts that are unobtainium and would be willing to provide samples/drawings to have them reproduced. I am not knowledgeable of 3d design at all.

    If time isn't an issue, I might be able to help toward the end of January.

    Quoted from TigerLaw:

    I would do the same with Varkon plastics...can you even print plastics with a 3D printer?

    What do you mean? Like flat clear plastics? Just want to be sure before I answer.

    #20 3 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    I have a spool of crystal clear on the way, should be here in the next couple of days. It's for testing lighting with swinks's shooter lanes. What material are ramps normally made out of?

    To the best of my knowledge ramps are acrylic. Let me know how the clear looks, the ABS clear just won't cut it.

    I'm in on the Flux 3D printer/scanner and am planning on purchasing a 3D pen, so that gives me a couple of options. Scan a broken ramp and make a new piece or use the pen to recreate the piece. The latter would obviously have more broad appeal, but I also want to try out the first option.

    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2117384013/flux-all-in-one-3d-printer-unlimited-elegant-simpl

    #21 3 years ago

    Hi wolf! How's the heated bed working for you? I just ordered one for my printer bot simple in hopes that it will help stop some of my larger prints from curling up.

    Brian

    20141126_095806.jpg
    20141129_162048.jpg

    #22 3 years ago
    Quoted from bpull:

    Hi wolf! How's the heated bed working for you? I just ordered one for my printer bot simple in hopes that it help with some of my larger prints from curling up.

    I love the heated bed. Granted, I've never printed without it, but there was a period where I was figuring out what bed temp works best for ABS. The bed can't reliably hold 100 degrees C, so I have it set to 90C for printing ABS, and 60C for PLA.

    What methods are you using to secure your first layer down?

    #23 3 years ago

    So far I have only printed PLA. I'm using mostly default print settings and configurations from the printrbot website. I've messed around a bit with putting down the first layer a little hotter then the rest on masking tape secured to the bed. I've found that some of my PLA filament colors run better at different temps so I'm trying to keep a log of those. For example the clear and glow in the dark filament print better near 200 while my black and blues print better at 205 to 208. I just got my machine around thanksgiving and I'm trying to learn and soak up as much info as I can to make good successful prints.
    What a cool and exciting machine though. I'm having a blast with it!

    Brian

    #24 3 years ago
    Quoted from bpull:

    So far I have only printed PLA. I'm using mostly default print settings and configurations from the printrbot website. I've messed around a bit with putting down the first layer a little hotter then the rest on masking tape secured to the bed. I've found that some of my PLA filament colors run better at different temps so I'm trying to keep a log of those. For example the clear and glow in the dark filament print better near 200 while my black and blues print better at 205 to 208. I just got my machine around thanksgiving and I'm trying to learn and soak up as much info as I can to make good successful prints.
    What a cool and exciting machine though. I'm having a blast with it!

    The thing that ended all of my warping was using Elmer's purple glue stick over the tape/kapton.

    I bought big sticks from amazon: amazon.com link »

    With the tape instead of kapton, you'll probably have to replace it after each print. With the kapton, I just wipe the bed off with alcohol to remove any glue residue, then run the glue stick over it again. I do it in a cross-hatch pattern.

    A friend of mine swears by aqua net hairspray, but I'm not interested in the overspray going everywhere. I like the glue sticks a lot. Give it a try if you haven't already!

    #25 3 years ago

    Thanks for the info! I will give the glue sticks a try.

    Brian

    #26 3 years ago
    Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

    If time isn't an issue, I might be able to help toward the end of January.

    What do you mean? Like flat clear plastics? Just want to be sure before I answer.

    Time is most certainly not an issue. I most importantly need a turret knob for a midway flying turns, thats not going to be produced. Ever.

    #27 3 years ago
    Quoted from PhilC:

    Time is most certainly not an issue. I most importantly need a turret knob for a midway flying turns, thats not going to be produced. Ever.

    Cool. Message me around the end of January to remind me and we will see what I can do.

    1 week later
    #28 3 years ago

    Hey all, glad to see others using 3d printers for pinball stuff!

    I recently joined the club with a PrintrBot Simple Metal, soon after I bought a heated bed because I wanted to try out ABS.

    I have no problems with PLA or ABS getting to stick (sometimes it sticks too well!) I am using blue painters tape. I do need to use new tape each print, but that is easy enough.

    I was getting frustrated at first with bad prints, but I found some hints scattered across the net to help with calibration, and also I was missing some critical settings (using repetier) that needed to be set correctly.

    Since I got everything setup, it seems to print reasonably well, even at the minimum .1 layer height.

    The one issue I am running into is wrapping my head around how to calibrate/set the layer WIDTH. I found some calibration objects for making a 1 layer wall, so you can use a micrometer to check the layer width, and also some "plug" objects to test how well 2 objects fit together. When I print the plugs, they don't fit together (the objects were printed too big).

    I forgot what the measured width of the 1 layer wall was, but it was also bigger then I was expecting.

    I guess my question is, with the simple metal and .040" extruder, what is the width SUPPOSED to be on a normal print? I guess I just assumed it would be around .040 with default settings. (extruder multiplier at 1.0x)

    I see in another post you mentioned: "When the printer lays down a layer, it usually squishes out a bead of filament that is 0.6mm wide." So is that the normal width and what I should be aiming for?

    #29 3 years ago
    Quoted from CraZyMuffin:

    The one issue I am running into is wrapping my head around how to calibrate/set the layer WIDTH. I found some calibration objects for making a 1 layer wall, so you can use a micrometer to check the layer width, and also some "plug" objects to test how well 2 objects fit together. When I print the plugs, they don't fit together (the objects were printed too big).

    I forgot what the measured width of the 1 layer wall was, but it was also bigger then I was expecting.

    I guess my question is, with the simple metal and .040" extruder, what is the width SUPPOSED to be on a normal print? I guess I just assumed it would be around .040 with default settings. (extruder multiplier at 1.0x)

    I see in another post you mentioned: "When the printer lays down a layer, it usually squishes out a bead of filament that is 0.6mm wide." So is that the normal width and what I should be aiming for?

    I don't use Repetier, but I can give you the info on how it works in Slic3r, I bet it's pretty similar. Slic3r does some math based on your layer height to determine the best width to extrude at.

    The nozzle actually has a flat part that is wider than the hole the filament comes out of. Reference my horrible MSPaint drawing below. The red filament is coming out of the 0.4mm hole, but the head of the extruder is actually like 1.5mm wide, so it squishes it flat.

    When you print the wall calibration object, you want to manually set it to extrude 0.4mm wide so you can measure the width of the single wall object to make sure its 0.4mm. That's basically testing that you are extruding the amount of filament that the computer thinks it's telling the printer to do. Another good test is the 100mm extrude test. Google it for a better description than I could ever type up.

    I normally leave the thickness set to automatically be determined by Slic3r, which is what I recommend unless you have a specific need to print a certain wall thickness. Bear in mind that the number of perimeters/shells * the extrude thickness for perimeters will be your final "shell" thickness. So if you set it to extrude .4mm and have 3 perimeters, you will typically expect to have a 1.2mm thick shell.

    For the parts fitting, I've seen them recommend to change the extrusion width on the external perimeters to something less than 0.4mm, but I felt that made the problem worse. What that is doing is not only changing the math for the gcode, but also forcing it to slightly under-extrude, making the outer perimeter thinner, and thus making the parts fit.

    tl;dr - let it be automatic.

    nozzle.jpg

    #30 3 years ago

    that makes sense about it squeezing out more and squishing it flat to get the wider thickness.

    I didn't think reptier had settings for this, but I guess I didn't put it together that this section here is what I am looking for. Oddly enough it is called "Extrusion width"

    being percetages it threw me off.. but now I know what to play with here! Thanks!

    extrusion.png
    #31 3 years ago
    Quoted from CraZyMuffin:

    being percetages it threw me off.. but now I know what to play with here! Thanks!

    Hah, totally slipped my mind that Repetier uses Slic3r. Yeah, that's the area to mess with. I've got all of mine set to 0.

    -1
    #32 3 years ago

    Great thread! I was curious about how 3D printers work, now I know.

    Found this time-lapse video of a Yoda being made, thought it was neat.

    #33 3 years ago

    Very cool thread. I keep looking for uses for the 3D printer I have available. I'm trying to figure out the ball launch handle for A13, but can't find any pics of how the original was constructed.

    I've got an Objet30 (polyjet) available. This material seems to be more rigid than an FDM part, but I' not sure, because I haven't seen both. Any chance anyone wants to try a side-by-side destructive test? I can supply the polyjet piece.

    #34 3 years ago

    Post edited by Trekie: duplicate post

    #35 3 years ago
    Quoted from CraZyMuffin:

    Hey all, glad to see others using 3d printers for pinball stuff!
    I recently joined the club with a PrintrBot Simple Metal, soon after I bought a heated bed because I wanted to try out ABS.
    I have no problems with PLA or ABS getting to stick (sometimes it sticks too well!) I am using blue painters tape. I do need to use new tape each print, but that is easy enough.
    I was getting frustrated at first with bad prints, but I found some hints scattered across the net to help with calibration, and also I was missing some critical settings (using repetier) that needed to be set correctly.
    Since I got everything setup, it seems to print reasonably well, even at the minimum .1 layer height.
    The one issue I am running into is wrapping my head around how to calibrate/set the layer WIDTH. I found some calibration objects for making a 1 layer wall, so you can use a micrometer to check the layer width, and also some "plug" objects to test how well 2 objects fit together. When I print the plugs, they don't fit together (the objects were printed too big).
    I forgot what the measured width of the 1 layer wall was, but it was also bigger then I was expecting.
    I guess my question is, with the simple metal and .040" extruder, what is the width SUPPOSED to be on a normal print? I guess I just assumed it would be around .040 with default settings. (extruder multiplier at 1.0x)
    I see in another post you mentioned: "When the printer lays down a layer, it usually squishes out a bead of filament that is 0.6mm wide." So is that the normal width and what I should be aiming for?

    I believe the adjustment you need adjust is called "scaling". If you using Repetier Host, the default setting is 1. Try 1.03 for abs. This will change from filament brands and colors. By using the scaling adjustment you can change your object size without redrawing it. Try Matter Control host program. It has 3 different slice programs that you can chose from. It's free and will work with your simple bots and Taz printers. You can also use Cura to slice with too

    Sorry for the previous post the block quotes didn't show.

    Ken

    #36 3 years ago

    I found some great info on the Slic3r program I thought I'd share. It's the manual that explains each section of the program and setting up your printer

    http://manual.slic3r.org/intro/overview

    Brian

    #37 3 years ago

    I'm keeping my eye on the titan 3d printer for detailed prints at work:
    http://www.kudo3d.com

    $2800 for an SLA printer (high detail), with almost the speed of an FDM printer, and more material options than there used to be. They're claiming printing down to 20 microns (size of a hair) without breaking. Just look at the detail:
    http://www.kudo3d.com/gallery

    titan_3d_print.jpg

    #38 3 years ago

    Is it cool if I put this info on the Pinball Makers wiki?

    #39 3 years ago

    Post edited by Trekie: double post

    #40 3 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    I'm keeping my eye on the titan 3d printer for detailed prints at work:
    http://www.kudo3d.com
    $2800 for an SLA printer (high detail), with almost the speed of an FDM printer, and more material options than there used to be. They're claiming printing down to 20 microns (size of a hair) without breaking. Just look at the detail:
    http://www.kudo3d.com/gallery

    titan_3d_print.jpg 30 KB

    Printer juice is costly and a short shelf life. The parts I have handled from SLA are brittle and were not suitable for use on a playfield. Yes the detail is better as it comes off the build plate. There is a lot of mess involved with a SLA printer, no click and go and when the print is done the clean up begins.

    #41 3 years ago
    Quoted from jwilson:

    Is it cool if I put this info on the Pinball Makers wiki?

    Of course!

    #43 3 years ago
    Quoted from Trekie:

    Printer juice is costly and a short shelf life. The parts I have handled from SLA are brittle and were not suitable for use on a playfield. Yes the detail is better as it comes off the build plate. There is a lot of mess involved with a SLA printer, no click and go and when the print is done the clean up begins.

    There are plenty of companies that make resins which when cured produce production ready parts, however they are very expensive like $2-300 a litre. Accura60 by 3d systems is one example.

    #44 3 years ago

    nice writeup. I have a kickstarter 3d printer coming in march which means november if Im lucky

    really looking to get a 3d scanner, thats when things really get interesting. im hoping there are some good cheap ones based on the new higher resolution kinect

    3 weeks later
    #45 3 years ago

    Saw a good article today that compares one of the more expensive printers against the cheap king, Printrbot Metal Simple.

    http://makezine.com/2015/02/06/can-a-600-3d-printer-beat-a-20000-machine/

    The comparison isn't 100% fair, because the more expensive printer would have a much easier job of printing specific objects, but it summarizes what I've found out.

    There's no need to wait for a $3,000 super tech-y, scanner, laser equipped beast. The $600 printrbot simple metal is fantastic, especially for the price.

    #46 3 years ago

    Cool article. I got my heat bed installed and holy crap what a difference in my print quality! I won't ever look back!

    Brian

    20150204_214748.jpg

    1 month later
    #47 3 years ago

    Hi wolfmarsh,

    Thought I'd pass this along and to you and anybody else that has the simple metal heated bed. Printrbot has a free upgrade that they say will allow you to reach 100C with the bed now. here is the link.

    http://printrbot.com/shop/heated-bed-insulator-for-simple-metal/

    Brian

    #48 3 years ago

    Thanks a ton bpull! I put in my order for the free insulator.

    #49 3 years ago

    I bought a Makerfarm i3v kit a while back and am pretty happy with it. I haven't printed out any Pin stuff yet but have printed quite a bit of other stuff with it.

    3d printing has a pretty steep learning curve before you can consistently produce good parts. Maybe an off the shelf printer would make it easier though.

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    $ 14.00
    From: $ 50.00
    Gameroom - Decorations
    Pinball Art Prints
    $ 53.00
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    £ 29.00
    Lighting - Led
    PinballToys
    $ 10.00
    Cabinet Parts
    Flashinstinct
    $ 39.95
    Playfield - Protection
    Little Shop Of Games
    $ 99.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    From: $ 799.00
    Hardware
    CPR Playfields
    From: $ 99.99
    Cabinet - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 36.99
    Lighting - Interactive
    Lee's Parts
    $ 76.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 29.99
    Cabinet - Sound/Speakers
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    From: $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 35.00
    Cabinet - Decals
    Bright Lights Pinball
    $ 7,499.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    $ 62.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 7,299.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    $ 39.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    ULEKstore
    $ 7,499.00
    Pinball Machine
    Gulf Coast Pinball, LLC
    $ 35.00
    Cabinet - Decals
    Pinball Pimp
    $ 5,599.00
    Pinball Machine
    Gulf Coast Pinball, LLC
    From: $ 42.00
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    There are 218 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 5.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside