(Topic ID: 124004)

Williams Swinger Restoration and (Eventual) Retheme


By RyanClaytor

4 years ago



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There are 711 posts in this topic. You are on page 7 of 15.
#301 3 years ago

Last night, as I debated what to do about my lamp sockets/leads, I popped the hood and started working on the:

IMG_8253.JPG

...which looks like this:

IMG_8265.JPG

If you recall, this was briefly mentioned when I came across the 87th use of a grocery store rubber band in this machine.

IMG_8254.JPG

I managed to get all the mechanical elements removed from the front side (no pic of parts, sorry), but stopped short as I looked at the PCB side:

IMG_8284.JPG

...mainly because I was trying to figure out an issue I noticed:

IMG_8263a.jpg

It's really difficult to photograph, but these two arms of the spider wheel are not touching the PCB. Here's a marginally different angle

IMG_8261a.jpg

So I guess I'll have to slightly bend them, once the spider-wheel is removed, in order to get them to make contact once again. Has anyone dealt with this before and have some tips?

Also of note, my lovely wife accompanied me down the basement last night as I tinkered around on ye olde' advance unit. Unfortunately she promised me Swinger would be my new bed if I posted a picture of her on Pinside. On the positive side, she pointed out some more things I need to take care of, namely the shooter rod housing:

IMG_8268.JPG

...which, she informed me, was plastic. We have a Jubilee, which came out from the same manufacturer only 1/2 a year later, and it has a metal housing. So, I've been told I should replace it. Along with the spring:

IMG_8270.JPG

...which, I've also been informed, is too rusty.

Today, I confirmed with Steve Young, that both parts are available and I'll be adding it to my next order.

#302 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

Well...I've got a couple cracked flippers I could throw in the mix.

Let me know will you? I'm curious if it'll work too.

Bruce

#303 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

2. I suck at soldering. ...and if I used shiny new sockets/leads, and I had to solder them in two times over, I'd fear my sub-par soldering work wouldn't live up to the pristine nature of those new leads.

I used to suck at soldering too, or at least I thought I did! I did everything I could do to avoid having to desolder the pop bumper lamp leads - I had five pop bumpers to do. I finally gave in and desoldered them. Even with a lousy, cheap woodburning iron that shouldn't be used for soldering, it was a snap to do. Pre-tinning the leads will simplify the soldering and don't forget to use a little flux before soldering. Bend the leads after putting the body back in place to simplify the soldering - leads touching or close to wires. Be sure to clean up the flux afterword - if only because it will leave a mess behind if you don't. So, I guess I am advising that you can solder them on now to test them or solder them later or both. Whatever, but don't sweat it. A little practice and you will soon be a pro! Oh yeah, I have a nice soldering station so I am no longer using an iron that I shouldn't be for soldering.

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

So I guess I'll have to slightly bend them, once the spider-wheel is removed, in order to get them to make contact once again. Has anyone dealt with this before and have some tips?

Bending them should be the last thing you do. Take the unit apart, clean it and lube it very lightly with Super Lube. Tighten the nut properly when putting it back together and the contacts should once more make contact. I heard about Super Lube here on Pinside. That stuff is great and really makes a difference how well the step unit will work after cleaning.

Still enjoying your thread!

#304 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

On the positive side, she pointed out some more things I need to take care of, namely the shooter rod housing:

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

...which, she informed me, was plastic. We have a Jubilee, which came out from the same manufacturer only 1/2 a year later, and it has a metal housing. So, I've been told I should replace it. Along with the spring:

Yeah, my 1969 Williams Expo has a plastic shooter rod housing and my 1973 Williams OXO has a metal shooter rod housing. Keep the plastic housing if, like me, you are cheap and want to keep as much of the original machine as possible. Be advised though that the plastic housing on my Expo was broken where one of the screws went into the plastic. I glued it with Gorilla Glue, put it back together and crossed my fingers that it wouldn't break again. If it does, I can always spring for the metal housing.

Speaking of springs, I got some brass springs at Marco's:

http://www.marcospecialties.com/pinball-parts/10-149-G

I like the brass better and maybe it won't rust as fast as the standard ball shooter barrel springs. Marco's also has it in black. Consider asking Steve if he has it in brass if you like what you see. Honestly, no one ever looks at the thing, but you are the one who has to be happy in the end! It's one of those detail items that only bothers the person who owns the machine.

#305 3 years ago

Pecos is correct about bending the legs of the spider, however, if after rebuild they still don't touch properly, you will need to bend. This happens when someone fat fingers the unit when adjusting something else, then wonders why the game doesn't work.

In the bingos, they did this sort of misadjustment intentionally (or much worse), so be thankful that this looks accidental.

#306 3 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

Even with a lousy, cheap woodburning iron that shouldn't be used for soldering, it was a snap to do.

Ha-ha! So awesome.

...I'll bet your wood-burning looks awfully fancy now.

Quoted from Pecos:

Pre-tinning the leads

Does "pre-tinning the leads" mean, put a little solder on the leads before REALLY soldering them to another wire?

Quoted from Pecos:

A little practice and you will soon be a pro!

Thanks for the words of encouragement.

Got that!

Quoted from Pecos:

Bending them should be the last thing you do

Good to know!!

Quoted from Pecos:

Tighten the nut properly when putting it back together and the contacts should once more make contact.

Intellesting!!!

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Pecos is correct about bending the legs of the spider, however, if after rebuild they still don't touch properly, you will need to bend.

Great! Now I have a plan of action!

Quoted from Pecos:

my 1969 Williams Expo has a plastic shooter rod housing ... Be advised though that the plastic housing on my Expo was broken where one of the screws went into the plastic.

PM me and we can work out details to get you my plastic shooter rod housing (assuming it's the kind you need for your Expo). I plan on ordering a metal one when I make my next parts order.

Quoted from Pecos:

brass spring at Marco's

Noted!

Quoted from Pecos:

Honestly, no one ever looks at the thing, but you are the one who has to be happy in the end! It's one of those detail items that only bothers the person who owns the machine.

So...SO true. *a-hem*MyLockDownBarReceiver*a-hem* ...'scuse me. Little frog in my throat, there.

Many thanks for all the feedback, guys! Truly appreciate it.

There he goes again with Bingo this and Bingo that. Has it been too many pages since I mentioned your podcast, Nick?

Take it easy, everyone!
Ryan Claytor
Proud Artist for For Amusement Only: The EM and Bingo Pinball Podcast

#307 3 years ago

I wish I could find it but somewhere around my home (probably in the attic) I have a complete '70s Williams ball shooter assembly with the metal shroud.
Probably only needs a plunger tip and maybe a new nylon sleeve (due to age). If I can find it I'd be glad to send it to you. Now that it's not in the 100s outside, I can get up in the attic and check some of my parts boxes over the weekend.

#308 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

Does "pre-tinning the leads" mean, put a little solder on the leads before REALLY soldering them to another wire?

Yep, that's exactly what it means. It's a term I learned and saw in action while working at Hughes. I should have said to pre-tin both the wires and the leads. Then, when you go to solder them, the new solder quickly melts making a better solder joint. It's not critical for what you are doing, but it does make it easier when you go to REALLY solder the leads to another wire.

#309 3 years ago
Quoted from girloveswaffles:

I have a complete '70s Williams ball shooter assembly with the metal shroud.

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

PM me and we can work out details to get you my plastic shooter rod housing

PM's have been sent/exchanged. Thanks, guys!

Quoted from Pecos:

Pre-tinning the leads...

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

Does "pre-tinning the leads" mean...?

Quoted from Pecos:

Yep, that's exactly what it means.

Ah-ha! I'll give that a try. Thanks for the suggestion, Pecos!

#310 3 years ago

These are my existing pop caps:

IMG_8314.jpg

These just came in the mail today:

IMG_8307.jpg

Steve Young (http://www.pbresource.com/) does an amazing job hot stamping these (and, yes, I made a special request that he send me blanks, without colored sunbursts):

IMG_8310.jpg

Eventually I'll be airbrushing them (a la, my Jubilee pop caps) to suit the re-theme color scheme. For those interested in a quick result from my Jubiliee:

DSC08370.jpg

For those interested in sleep-aid...er, I mean...an exhaustive step-by-step process recap (you are following THIS thread, after all):

http://www.elephanteater.com/9720

I also received these:

IMG_8312.jpg

...for when I start filing contacts, at some point. They were pretty cheap, for anyone interested:

amazon.com link »

I also got some work done this evening. Took off the advance unit's questionable spider wheel I mentioned last time. So, this:

IMG_8315.jpg

...now looks like this:

IMG_8316.jpg

...and ultimately, I was left with this:

IMG_8317.jpg

#311 3 years ago

I neglected my usual glam shots for most of the cleaning, but here are a couple.

Before:

IMG_8318.jpg

After:

IMG_8319.jpg

This unit was pretty much a mess. Quite greasy/oily/sludgey, and then there's the whole spider wheel debacle. I think I may have figured-out why some of the contacts weren't connecting with the PCB. Again, this is really difficult to photograph, but some of the arms seem to have been bent back a bit. You can see the mild crease here:

IMG_8323.jpg

...and it's evident in profile, too:

IMG_8324.jpg

This is a different arm, with a different bend:

IMG_8325.jpg

Of course I didn't keep track of which arms were making contact and which weren't, so I can't confirm these arms are the culprits.

Nevertheless, these parts are now clean...

IMG_8326.jpg

...and with the exception of cleaning/lubing the PCB, the Advance Unit should be ready for reassembly next time.

Mighty-night.

#312 3 years ago

I like to put the plunger rod in a drill and sand then polish the aluminum nob. It is super quick and really makes it look great. You could probably do it to other pieces like that sprocket if it will fit in the drill's chuck. It is probably a good idea to start with a 500+ grit sand paper unless you want it to have a brushed finish. This little makeshift lathe trick will make you want to get a real lathe though.

This video captures the joy of making things shiny.

#313 3 years ago

Pre tinning helps out a lot. I use that method all the time.

#314 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I also received these:

IMG_8312.jpg
IMG_8312.jpg
(Click image to enlarge)

...for when I start filing contacts, at some point. They were pretty cheap, for anyone interested

Not cheap considering the correct tool for contacts is flexstone from PBR at a buck a piece. You want to clean the contacts, not file them. Metal file is for reshaping high current contacts, to make them flat again.

#315 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

This unit was pretty much a mess. Quite greasy/oily/sludgey, and then there's the whole spider wheel debacle. I think I may have figured-out why some of the contacts weren't connecting with the PCB. Again, this is really difficult to photograph, but some of the arms seem to have been bent back a bit. You can see the mild crease here:
IMG_8323.jpg
...and it's evident in profile, too:

No way any of those wiper arms should be curved upwards and then down. The wiper should only go outward, and then slope down to the contact board. I looks like someone at one time bent that wiper, and tried to bend it back in place.
The second one in img.8325 looks almost like it's been twisted. Other than that, those parts are looking nice with the clean up you're doing.

#316 3 years ago
Quoted from FrankJ:

the correct tool for contacts is flexstone

Can you provide a photo of one? I want to be sure the two I have in my tool kit are flexstones.

Bruce

#317 3 years ago
Quoted from FrankJ:

Not cheap considering the correct tool for contacts is flexstone from PBR at a buck a piece. You want to clean the contacts, not file them. Metal file is for reshaping high current contacts, to make them flat again.

I'd recommend something like this for the wiper contacts (just an example):

amazon.com link »

It will polish the surface, not file them down. Flexstone is fine for flat contacts (as long as you don't use them to aggressively), but on the rounded contacts, the Fiberglass eraser will clean more evenly. It will also get any grime or corrosion off at the seam between the blade and the contact mounting. They are also great for cleaning the surface on the contact board.

Here are some more: amazon.com link »

#318 3 years ago

Flexstones look like a cross between sandpaper and emery board. And they work in a similar fashion. You're filing the crud off of the switch.

The unfortunate side-effect of this is that, aside from (lightly) filing the switch, you are also spreading conductive dust. I've been on the bad side of troubleshooting a problem with the dust. Not fun. You also have to replace them frequently because the dust that is abrasive comes off of them, leaving you with thick paper. They are maybe 2-3 inches long. It can also be very difficult to use them in certain situations because of the length.

Ignition files are made for reshaping contact points. If the switch is pitted (which dirt can cause) you use the ignition file to file out the pit. You can also use them to lightly file off the crud if it's really bad. They are longer, they are stronger, and they last a very very long time.

If it's just a little bit dirty? You can clean them the same way you might clean a solid state switch - business card (cardstock) dragged through the switch multiple times.

My personal opinion only, and everyone's got the right to their own of course, is that you can use the ignition files with finesse, having a single tool to do your cleaning and shaping. It has worked very well for me, and ensures that you have proper transfer of current. Sometimes it is hard to tell when the switch stack is assembled that there is fine pitting. Again, you don't have to go full bore with the tool and can use lightly to accomplish the same thing (with less chance of a dusty side-effect).

Now, it's not like the dirt and metal that the file removes won't bite you in a similar way - it's just less likely cause there's less of it.

My opinion only! Both ways work! Pick what you like best and stick with it. For $1, try out flexstones and see if you like them.

#319 3 years ago

Oh, and yes, you don't ever file wiper contacts. Ever. Don't even flexstone them.

#320 3 years ago
Quoted from davideokills:

This video captures the joy of making things shiny.

drool.gif

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I also received these...pretty cheap

Quoted from FrankJ:

flexstone from PBR at a buck a piece. You want to clean the contacts, not file them.

Quoted from girloveswaffles:

I'd recommend something like this for the wiper contacts

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Flexstones...
Ignition files...

CONTROVERSY!!!

This thread is about the erupt...I can feel it. Get ready for things to go all J-Pop up in here!

croc.gif

On a different note:

How does that compare to using something like the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser? Totally different? (Serious question.)

#321 3 years ago

Totally different. Used mainly in circuit board repair to clean traces.

#322 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

drool.gif

CONTROVERSY!!!
This thread is about the erupt...I can feel it. Get ready for things to go all J-Pop up in here!
croc.gif
On a different note:

How does that compare to using something like the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser? Totally different? (Serious question.)

Serious (and hopefully non controversial) answer:

I haven't tried either on contacts before, but I imagine Magic Eraser would be okay on the contact board (maybe easier because of the size. It'd probably work on the wipers as well, but the eraser can get down on the edges of the contacts better.

Edit: BTW heat stamping on those white sunburst caps look sweet.

#323 3 years ago
Quoted from girloveswaffles:

BTW heat stamping on those white sunburst caps look sweet.

Word-up! Here's a quickie from my Jubilee pop cap resto I mentioned above:

jubi.jpg

OOOooooooo...yeah. (Say it like Barry White.)

#324 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

CONTROVERSY!!!

This thread is about the erupt...I can feel it.

Actually, no. There's a big difference between cleaning and filing. We're all discussing methods of cleaning the contacts without harming the coating that many have on them or etching/removing metal from them. Some people are more aggressive than others in their methods.

Frank

#325 3 years ago

Edit #2: Ulp, beat to the punch by FrankJ! Yes, what he said. Everyone has their own methods. Mine are relatively abrasive.

Magic Eraser should not, in my opinion (again only my opinion), be used on the wiper boards as it leaves behind lots of junk as it self-disintegrates. It will likely clean the gunk off (though that may be more in the alcohol than the sandpapery melmanine foam).

The fiberglass eraser is totally different and could work, but the contact surface is so large, and you typically have much more than 5 V required to make the journey through the legs of the spider (depends on what it is doing!). This means that you would run through the fiberglass erasers like water (they also wear down) to get the same level of cleanliness that the Scotch-brite provides. I use those (edit 1: meaning the fiberglass erasers) when working on solid state boards all the time.

Yes, the scotch-brite is more abrasive, however, the surface area is also large.

Just my .02 (which doesn't really amount to much).

#326 3 years ago
Quoted from bingopodcast:

The fiberglass eraser is totally different and could work, but the contact surface is so large, and you typically have much more than 5 V required to make the journey through the legs of the spider (depends on what it is doing!). This means that you would run through the fiberglass erasers like water (they also wear down) to get the same level of cleanliness that the Scotch-brite provides.

A-hem. Does work. I've used them for years on contact points. And what is the worry about Magic Eraser or Fiberglass eraser wearing down? just about ANYTHING you use will probably wear down, or get contaminated with debris from cleaning? You don't do the wipers while they're on the machine, you do them at a table or work bench. And if you don't want to remove the disk, you lay some thing under it or use a vacuum as you work on it and / or after you're done. And depending on what grade of Scotch-brite you're using it can be quite abrasive and leave a lot of fibers behind as well. so it's not any better if even equal to the other options.

As far as the Fiberglass eraser Going like "Water", not really. The filaments go quite a ways.

Here's a sample I did tonight:
Wiper an eraser.jpg

And here's a before and after image:
B4 and B-After.jpg
I didn't really need to do the entire wiper arm, but just did it to show what can be done. And I only used about a 16th of an inch of a 2" filament.

point.jpg

#327 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

Word-up! Here's a quickie from my Jubilee pop cap resto I mentioned above:
jubi.jpg
OOOooooooo...yeah. (Say it like Barry White.)

I'd buy a Strange Science just to change the bumper bodies to be able to put those style caps with that Atom artwork on it!

#328 3 years ago

Nice. Again, for clarity, I don't use scotch brite on the wiper arms either. I was talking about the Bakelite disc. The fiberglass pen does clean that spider up nicely.

I also don't remove the Bakelite disc from the game. The type of scotch brite I use does not shed readily. I hear what you're saying, though.

I wouldn't have tried the fiberglass eraser, so nice to see another method!

#329 3 years ago

I like to use Brasso on the bakelite plate & polish it, then clean off with 91% alcohol & finish up with a VERY-VERY light coat of Teflon gel lube.

#330 3 years ago

Wow. That is a thing of beauty, Gir.

I know, that emblem is pretty great, isn't it. PBR lists it as the "squiggle" but atom is pretty fitting. There's one on Swinger and I've got a couple on my Jubilee...as you probably saw above.

Quoted from girloveswaffles:

I've used them for years...

Quoted from bingopodcast:

...nice to see another method!

I get the feeling there's a bunch of 'em (methods, that is)!

---------------

So, it had been a few days since my little guy had been down to help...

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

clean peembah m'sheem!

I was trying to think of task we could do together, since my current pile of parts...

IMG_8326.jpg

...isn't something that's well suited for his ability level. (Heck, it's barely suitable for mine.)

But then I remembered talking about...

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

my existing pop caps

...last time. Since I purchased new ones to custom paint, I was just gonna slap the old caps on as place-holders for play-testing, without cleaning, until I strip the machine again for the re-theme. I figured those were pretty safe items for him to clean, and when I looked back at them, they were a lot less filthy than I had in my mind. So we started by putting some "MAVIS" on an old cloth:

IMG_8345.jpg

(Did I mention he's a Thomas the Train fanatic?)

mavis.jpg

Then some rubbing:

IMG_8335.jpg

...and then some admiring:

IMG_8337.jpg

With a little help from daddy (this is the before image):

IMG_8332.jpg

...we managed to get some pretty decent results!

IMG_8360.jpg

I was surprised how durable that paint was!

IMG_8361.jpg

A tiny bit came off on the rag, but the slight removal was unnoticeable on the cap.

(A couple more examples to come on the following post.)

#331 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I get the feeling there's a bunch of 'em (methods, that is)!

Oh there are. And some work better on different types of contacts and boards than others. You could use the Fiberglass eraser on the PC board type contact boards, but BOY! it would be tedious. That's where using something like Magic Eraser, A very fine 3M Flexible finishing pad or even just a pink eraser works a lot faster.

Edited: I so hate editing down quotes o just the line you're responding too. Seems like I always screw it up.

#332 3 years ago

Before:

IMG_8334.jpg

After:

IMG_8348.jpg

Before:

IMG_8343.jpg

After:

IMG_8363.jpg

Here's what we managed to get done before attention spans ran short:

IMG_8365.jpg

'til next time!

ron.gif

#333 3 years ago

Alright, back to the Advance Unit. I started by cleaning the PCB in the same way I did the score reels' PCBs, using green scotch brite pads. The dirt was pretty caked on this one, so I used a dab of 91% isopropyl alcohol to persuade it out. Here's the end result:

IMG_8371.jpg

From here I had my...

I would...

Quoted from Pecos:

Tighten the nut properly

...which still yeilded this...

IMG_8374.jpg

If you don't recall...

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

...these two arms of the spider wheel are not touching the PCB.

Here's a closer version:

Untitled-2.jpg

At this point, I took note which arms were not touching (small black sharpie mark on each arm) and then took off the spider wheel. With the wheel removed, I put super lube on the PCB (the thinnest of coats!)...

IMG_8376.jpg

...as I've been warned previously to...

Quoted from bingopodcast:

...use my finger...

...and apply sparingly.

So, continuing my...

Which stated...

Quoted from bingopodcast:

...if after rebuild they still don't touch properly, you will need to bend.

So, bend I did, with the spider wheel unattached. After reassembling, the couple arms that needed a solid connection had it, and every other arm was hitting their mark, save for this guy...

IMG_8379.jpg

...which was kind of landing on a mid-point. It was questionable (to my eyes) whether or not the contact was resting on the lead or on the bakelite:

Untitled-1.jpg

So, after another gentle coaxing with the switch adjuster...

bend.jpg

...that arm, too, began to behave:

IMG_8383.jpg

#334 3 years ago

After dealing with the sketchy spider wheel, there was still another issue to quell on this Advance Unit, the springs:

IMG_8386.jpg

Reminder: Prior to disassembly and cleaning, this...

rubberband.jpg

...had me thinking that I needed another spring. So I bought a pack of a couple springs from PBR...

IMG_8389.jpg

...however, when I compared the diagram with my advance unit, it appeared as though only two springs were needed:

IMG_8389a.jpg

...which happen to already be on my Advance Unit:

IMG_8389b.jpg

Still uncertain, I tried putting the smaller of the two springs in the location where the rubber band was previously located. However, not only was there hardly any clearance between the existing spring and the location for the rubber band replacement, but the metal loops on the ends were too small to fit on the post:

IMG_8390.jpg

Then I tried the larger spring, but even holding it up to the area at rest revealed that the spring (green hands) was longer than the posts upon which the rubber band sat (red hands):

IMG_8391.jpg

All this to say, I'm reasonably certain that I only need the couple of springs that were already on my Advance Unit, and it does not need a third. I'm just a little confused as to why a previous owner felt the need to string a rubber band around a couple more posts.

Anyhow, I'm calling this one done and moving on to pop bumpers.

IMG_8377.jpg

#335 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

...however, when I compared the diagram with my advance unit, it appeared as though only two springs were needed:

That is correct - only two springs needed for that stepper unit. The PBR diagram also shows a third spring if you look closely, but that is only for stepper units with bells and strikers. My Expo has a match unit with a bell, striker and the third spring.

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I'm just a little confused as to why a previous owner felt the need to string a rubber band around a couple more posts.

Owners/operators do that to get the stepper unit to work when they don't have the time to properly clean and rebuild it.

You have two brand new springs so you might as well replace the two old springs with the two new ones.

#336 3 years ago
Quoted from Pecos:

That is correct - only two springs needed for that stepper unit.

Excellent! Thanks for the confirmation.

Quoted from Pecos:

You have two brand new springs so you might as well replace the two old springs with the two new ones.

Not a bad idea. Okay, here we go.

Old springs:

IMG_8408.jpg

Not in horrible shape, but as Pecos mentioned, if I've got the new ones, why not? So I hand one of the springs to my son and ask him where he thinks it might go:

IMG_8409.jpg

He was pretty close, but opted for a hole in the back of the playfield, which led to the inside of the ball arch.

jim.gif

So a-fishing I went (with one of those extend-o magna-gadgets):

IMG_8411.jpg

When that didn't work, I was getting fearful that another ball-arch disassembly was eminent. That is, until I remembered that the ball arch is not a sealed unit:

IMG_8410.jpg

Batdance.gif

Finally, here are the new springs, right where they should be.

IMG_8412.jpg

COMPARISON!!!

comp.jpg

#337 3 years ago

Before the morning got away with us and naptime was nigh, we also cleaned the last couple of pop caps together.

A before shot:

IMG_8398.jpg

(Here I was being told about some dirt we needed to deal with):

IMG_8399.jpg

After dealing:

IMG_8404.jpg

Before:

IMG_8401.jpg

After:

IMG_8402.jpg

Pop caps, ready for...playtesting?

IMG_8407.jpg

Aside from the burned 100 squiggle/atom cap, I'm pretty impressed with how these cleaned up. If I wan't rethemeing the machine, I probably would have only replaced that one.

#338 3 years ago

It's supprising how little fade there is on the coloured rays on the outer part of the caps. Even the printing looks good fot it's age.

#339 3 years ago

Agreed. My Jubilee, which is from the same manufacturer, essentially the same age, and was in far better condition had pop caps that were HOSED!!! Not only was the plastic yellowed, but the sunburst colors were all but gone. These Swinger caps seem practically new, aside from the minor burn on the 100 squiggle. Astounding.

Edit: Because pictures.

My Jubilee pop caps on arrival:

DSC08328.jpg

Yeesh.

DSC08329.jpg

Before, as they came. After, new blank caps with airbrushing:

beforeAfter.jpg

Swinger Caps, stock...only cleaned:

IMG_8407.jpg

#340 3 years ago

Found it!
Found.jpg

And found why I had set it aside,
Bad End.jpg
... but with some help from a friend (in the backgroud)
Dremel.jpg
new rod.jpg

#341 3 years ago

Wha--!!

clapping.gif

Quoted from girloveswaffles:

... but with some help from a friend

Ha-ha! MOAR POWAH!!! Looks like your dremel made short work of that ole' mushroomy shooter-rod. *LOL*

P.S. PM Sent, and many thanks for unearthing that housing for me!!!

#342 3 years ago

I'm at the point of trying to get my pop-bumpers back in order. In doing so, I spent about half an hour trying to (unsuccessfully) solder this lead to this wire:

photo-3.jpg

It was an exercise in patience tonight. One I likely failed.

Tomorrow's another day and I'll follow the fine soldering advice given on this thread a lot more closely next try.

#343 3 years ago

Please tell me you are not trying to solder this upside down at an angle?!!!???

#344 3 years ago
Quoted from Mk1Mod0:

Please tell me you are not trying to solder this upside down at an angle?!!!???

As if there's any other way!

I hope you are soldering the lead with the rest of the pop bumper mech off at least.

Another thing you can try in addition to not soldering upside down with the mech on is to tin the leads before you put the pop bumper base back on the playfield. That way you can just hit them with some paste and use your free hand to coax the wire into place while you heat up the tinned lead.

#345 3 years ago

Notes on making pop bumpers POP!

Obviously the mechanism should be clean with at least a new sleeve if not a new coil. The spoon switch leaf has a way of collecting a lot of dirt so make sure those are nice and clean. The plastic point of the pop bumper skirt should be lined up with the middle of the spoon so it makes quick contact from every angle. And the pop bumper relays should be cleaned very thoroughly because they are a key component in these EMs.

With EMs you have to have your pops dialed in like you would with your flippers because so much of the action and fun of the game is dependent on the pop bumpers.

#346 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

In doing so, I spent about half an hour trying to (unsuccessfully) solder this lead to this wire:

You win the "Patience Award of the Day" for pinball repair! I would have screamed and quit long before that!

Here are a few more tips based on your picture:

Put a little flux on both the wire and the lead to cover the length of the lead and the same length on the wire.
Pre-tin both with enough solder to cover the same area noted above.
Carefully bend the lead, after it cools of course, and slide it under the wire to sit parallel to and as close to the wire as possible. You might have to bend the wire as well to get the two to meet.
Put a little solder on the soldering iron tip.
Keep the tip flat or a pointed a little bit down relative to the floor.
Touch the iron tip to the wire and lead. It should take just a few seconds for the pre-tinned solder to flow and create a perfect solder joint.
You may need to hold the lead in place a few seconds until it cools, without moving it. Use a tool, not fingers to hold in place.
Sit back and wait for applause. If that fails to occur, pat yourself on the back.
Rinse, not literally, and repeat on the other pop bumper leads/wires.

#347 3 years ago

You guys are a bunch of bosses.

bowieboss.gif

Thanks, as always, for helpin' out an electronically-inhibited artist. Of course, I'll update with my more successful results (it would be difficult to have a less successful session than last night).

#348 3 years ago

Here is a picture that shows pretty much how the pop bumper lead should look when bent and set back into place and how the wire should be attached:

looks_can_be_deceiving.jpg

A picture is worth a thousand words, or exactly 42 in this case.

Looks can be deceiving. If you will remember, this wire looked like it was properly soldered to the lead, but in reality, it wasn't.

needs_a_little_more_solder.jpg

It needs a little more solder than that!

#349 3 years ago
Quoted from Mk1Mod0:

Please tell me you are not trying to solder this upside down at an angle?!!!???

I did mention I'm an artist, right? I figured I'd go all Sistine Chapel on this restore.

really_.gif

Honestly, I'm workin' like this:

IMG_8523.jpg

Open to thoughts and suggestions of alternate working methods.

Quoted from davideokills:

I hope you are soldering the lead with the rest of the pop bumper mech off at least.

To be completely honest, I wasn't initially. ...which certainly added to the challenge (impossibility) of the situation. However, about half-way through my exercise in futility, I did realize I should probably take off that coil housing thing that attaches to the playfield. Despite a little extra room to maneuver, I still failed to complete the job the other night.

Quoted from davideokills:

...tin the leads before you put the pop bumper base back on the playfield.

Oh my god, yes! That's brilliant. I will do that for all of the following bumpers. Thank you.

Quoted from Pecos:

You win the "Patience Award of the Day" for pinball repair!

Oh, I dunno. My wife, god bless her, was keeping me company in the basement for that little work session. By the end of it she was wondering why I'm interested in doing this at all. Ha-ha! Of course, she chose the least productive tinker-sesh to witness.

Quoted from Pecos:

Here is a picture that shows pretty much how the pop bumper lead should look

I'm still trying to figure out if you used one of my own images against me or if you developed another ridiculous hand-pointer for an image of your own.

*thread scan*

Okay, wows. That was from back in the ancient days of page 3. Pecos wins the thorough award. Nicely done, good sir!

===========

I've said it before and I'm sure I'll say it again, thank you ALL for your help and encouragement. Seriously.

waynesworldnotworthy.gif

#350 3 years ago

If you have some portable sawhorses, you can lay a blanket across them, then set your playfield on it to make life a little easier.

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