(Topic ID: 124004)

Williams Swinger Restoration and (Eventual) Retheme


By RyanClaytor

4 years ago



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#51 4 years ago

Yeah, what he said. I've tossed perfectly good working brass, aluminum and old nylon sleeves in favor of new nylon. Less friction and what not.

#52 4 years ago

Okay, another update. Time to clean the...

replayUnit.jpg

...or credit reel. Or whatever you feel like calling it. Anyhow, it's this thing in the Swinger backbox:

backboxCreditUnit.jpg

...and looks like this:

creditUnit.jpg

The Replay unit (along with the Player Unit) both have that frightening spring I've been warned about. Here's the other side:

replayUnitB.jpg

...and this is the spring:

spring.jpg

More on that a few pictures down the line.

After unscrewing the replay unit from the backbox, the first thing I did was actuate the coils to see if they moved the credit reel. They did...sort of. The range of motion was very limited. The reel moved only a few clicks in either direction, and numbers were never visible in the little window thing on the front:

noNumbers.jpg

At this point I was pretty puzzled. This is my first replay unit disassembly, so I really wasn't sure what needed to happen. EM Wunderkind, Nick Baldridge, set me straight, though. He told me about these posts that stick up out of the gear on the back. They are supposed to set the limits for max and min credits. Sure enough, there they were:

posts.jpg

...and somehow, the switches had become lodged in-between the posts, preventing them from moving more than a few clicks in either direction. The switches are supposed to be on the other side of those posts, with maximum clearance on either side...not lodged in that tiny space.

This meant removing the switch stacks.

I was a little frightened about keeping all those blades and bakelite together in the process of moving them. However, Nick suggested using a twist-tie or a pipe cleaner to temporarily keep them in their unit once the screw was removed. This sounded pretty logical.

Then I noticed this:

hardwareCockBlock.jpg

...a piece of hardware separating the switch stack. This was going to be a challenge, as I realized I would need several additional limbs for this procedure. I took out the nuts and screws holding the stacks in place.

bolts.jpg

After that I sort of blacked-out. It was a flurry of finger contortions and single-handed multi-holds and when I came to, the stacks had been adequately secured with twisty-ties and there were no switch-blades or bakelite fragments on the floor.

twisttie.jpg

As you can see above, I managed to actuate the gear around so that the switches would no longer be trapped. Then reattached them:

inPlace.jpg

From there I detached the spring in order to disassemble the coils and coil stops. You remember the spring, right?

spring.jpg

Well, removing it wasn't as death-defying as I'd feared. I can see how if you were just ripping stuff off the unit with reckless abandon that it might "getchya!" But removing it in a calm state of mind will make things go very smoothly.

springOff.jpg

The piece of advice that was most helpful to me was a reminder to count the number of rotations of the spring as it came off in order to properly retention the spring during reassembly. My spring took 4 rotations to unwind. Here's my reminder:

rotations.jpg

With the spring off, I was able to disassemble the coil and coil stops. When doing so, I noticed something else odd:

stopRecessed.jpg

The coil stop had what looked like a deliberately recessed ring. However, the plunger did not. I looked at the other coil stop and it had a similar looking deliberate recess:

recess.jpg

Sooo, maybe that wacky coil stop and plunger I found in the match unit...

(Scroll down through this previous installment for a refresher: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/williams-swinger-restoration-and-eventual-retheme#post-2405941 )

...weren't that wacky after all? Maybe these coil stops aren't meant to be flat. Maybe the formerly flat plunger just began to meld to the shape of that recessed coil stop over time.

Thoughts?

Anyhow, after solenoids and springs and things got reassembled on this side, I unbolted the credit reel itself. However, I couldn't quite figure out how to remove the reel, so I just set about cleaning the surface. Since the reel now seemed to be moving well as it incremented and decremented, I didn't feel like I needed to strip the entire mech apart. Here's a before and after of the credit reel cleaning:

beforeafter.jpg

Now the unit is reassembled, firmly in place back in the backbox, and lookin' snazzy with numbers visible:

replayUnitC.jpg

Next time, player unit.

done.gif

#53 4 years ago

Wow, you are getting good! Fixing other peoples mistakes

2 weeks later
#54 4 years ago
Quoted from cad-kid:

Wow, you are getting good! Fixing other peoples mistakes

Thanks, Cad-kid. ...although this next post might prove otherwise.

- -- ----- -- -

First of all, HI!

hi.gif

Pardon my absence. There's been a perfect storm of fixing frustrations and an out-of-state parental visit. Yadda yadda, let's get back to it.

So I'm on to the...

ballcountunit.jpg

...which is located here...

backboxBallCount.jpg

...and looks like this...

ballcountunitA.jpg

...and this:

ballcountunitB.jpg

So I did all the usual disassembly, cleaning and copious picture taking.

Including making this crusty ole' cam...

crustyCam.jpg

...shiny and new again:

crustyCamB.jpg

Likewise with the traces. Here's before:

tracesCrusty.jpg

...and after:

tracesShiny.jpg

Finally with a light coating of lube (I know it looks goopy. It's not.)

tracesLube.jpg

However, the thing that is kickin' my butt is the reassembly of those spider-arms. You see...

inthemiddleA.jpg

...despite taking pictures and marking the position of the arm on the PCB before disassembly, the arms are sitting right in the middle of the traces after each tick.

inthemiddleB.jpg

What's more, the action of the solenoids are weird. ...like, it will tick up, but then the reset solenoid just sort of allows it to ooze back down. Not real quick or smooth. Plus, I'm not sure how many ticks it should move in either direction.

At a bit of a stand-still. Thoughts?

#55 4 years ago

1) Sure it's not goopy?
2) If not goopy at all - anywhere - increase the tension of the gear spring either by moving its connecting point on the gear or by looping an additional time.
3) Looking at the unit, you can see two screws under the spider. Loosen them and you will have pivoting ability on the disc. Rotate a bit clockwise (from the wiper side) and good to go! You're close enough that that adjustment should work.

-Nick

#56 4 years ago

Make sure you didn't tighten down the nut too hard. It can make a difference. Then it becomes a balancing act. Not enough spring tension = easy up but crawls down. Too much spring tension = Won't tick up easily and sometimes plays the same ball twice but returns in a nice snap.

#57 4 years ago

You guys a radical. Thanks for the suggestions. I'll report back.

1 week later
#58 3 years ago

Hi again,

So this past weekend I exhibited my illustration work (T-shirts, Prints, Magazines, etc) at the VFW Ann Arbor Pinball Museum Showcase. (My picto-wrap-up for those interested: http://www.elephanteater.com/10965/ )

Anyhow, I mention this because while I was there I saw this (fully functional, BTW):

sale.jpg

Uunnngh...

The impatient side of me wanted to throw cash at my problem, sell my barn-dweller, and start on artwork already. However, the practical (and cheap) side of me knows that I'm getting a hell of an education by resurrecting my little heap. ...plus, I'll actually have a fighting chance of diagnosing any future problems on my re-themed machine, which certainly wouldn't be the case if I bought a fully-functional Swinger. Anyhow...there was temptation this past weekend.

But there was also confirmation! You may recall my EM physical trainer mentioning...

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Looking at the unit, you can see two screws under the spider. Loosen them and you will have pivoting ability on the disc.

Well, in one of many pinball-related conversations I had over the weekend, I showed this image to an EM-focused fellow:

tracesLube.jpg

He noticed something we all overlooked on this thread:

PCBcocked.jpg

...the alignment issue was actually visible!

So I realigned it using the screws that everyone told me about and viola:

corrected.jpg

MUCH better.

correctedCloser.jpg

I may tweak this slightly just to get it dead-nuts centered on the traces, but I was pretty happy to have figured-out my problem (with the help of several folks all telling me the same thing).

Now I still have to figure out the sluggish movement of the reset coil...

#59 3 years ago

Very nice work. Makes me feel like I should go clean my stepper unit...

#61 3 years ago

As I mentioned:

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I still have to figure out the sluggish movement of the reset coil.

because the spider thing was sort of oozing back into a questionable position. Sometimes it would waddle back 6 spaces, sometimes 5, other times 7. It was weird. ...and while I wasn't certain how many traces it was supposed to hop back, I was pretty sure it wasn't a variable amount.

So I tried a little of this:

Quoted from bingopodcast:

increase the tension of the gear spring either by moving its connecting point on the gear or by looping an additional time.

...and some of this:

Quoted from Mk1Mod0:

Not enough spring tension = easy up but crawls down. Too much spring tension = Won't tick up easily and sometimes plays the same ball twice but returns in a nice snap.

and I think I've got it working as it should. Snap-back is nice and quick, not sluggish as before, and step-up is working pretty easily. I'm also convinced it's supposed to step 10 times. For those in the know, is that true?

Here's the reset position (pictured) and then it steps 10 times after that before it stops:

tracesCounted.jpg

#62 3 years ago

P.S. I wanted to mention something about the other side of the Ball Count Unit:

ballCountUnitBack052315.jpg

Specifically, the switch stack here:

ballCountUnitBack052315switchStack.jpg

...which is terribly difficult to photograph, so I backed it with an old receipt I had lying around:

ballCountUnitBack052315switchStackBacked.jpg

In my infinite newb wisdom, I figured I'd better check the switches to make sure everything looked like it was doing what it was supposed to. So here's the reset position:

ballCountUnitBack052315switchStackBacked00.jpg

...and as the unit begins to step, the gear turns and the little gear rod pushing on the switch stack begins to move away. Here's the first step away from reset (I labeled it the one position in my previous post):

ballCountUnitBack052315switchStackBacked01.jpg

And here's the two position (which, I'm assuming, should be the same thing as the one position):

ballCountUnitBack052315switchStackBacked02.jpg

However, when I watched the movement of the switches from the 0 to the 1 position, I felt like something was amiss. The connection of the switches seemed to be...faint, at best. Once I took a closer look at the photos from above, I noticed there is a slight gap between the right switches at the 1 position, when it appears they should be touching. Here's a little closer zoom of the switches at the 1 position:

ballCountUnitBack052315switchStackBacked01zoom.jpg

So, it appears as though I have a bit of switch adjustment ahead of me before I put this unit to bed.

3 weeks later
#63 3 years ago

On the off-chance someone is wondering about this thread, I am not dead, nor is this project. My family and I are taking advantage of our summer vacation (wife and I are both teachers) and making some time to visit our parents in California (our homeland). As I've discovered, it's difficult to work on a pin from 10 states away. Nevertheless, I should be back at it around late July or so. In the meantime, if anyone is planning to attend Comic-Con International in San Diego, I'll be exhibiting my comics and a bunch of pinball-related illustrations in the Small Press Pavilion:

http://www.elephanteater.com/10597

See you back here in a month or so,
Ryan

#64 3 years ago

Suh-weet! I have always wanted to do the San Diego C-Con. Have fun!

#65 3 years ago
Quoted from Mk1Mod0:

Suh-weet! I have always wanted to do the San Diego C-Con. Have fun!

Many thanks. I'll post some pics.

#66 3 years ago

I was recently interviewed on the 100th episode of "For Amusement Only - The EM and Bingo Pinball Podcast." I mention this here only because we talk quite a bit about this Swinger restore/retheme project. Here's the permalink for anyone interested:

http://foramusementonly.libsyn.com/episode-100-interview-with-ryan-claytor-5-25-15

2 weeks later
#67 3 years ago
Quoted from Mk1Mod0:

San Diego C-Con

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I'll post some pics

As promised...

Here's my family at my table:

IMG_6398.JPG

Again, with one of my favorite artists (Sergio Aragones):

IMG_6403.JPG

Then my son pee'd on me:

IMG_6406.JPG

After a shirt change, I met fellow Pinsider, Girloveswaffles:

IMG_6414.JPG

Lionman, indeed! Gave him one of two remaining Pinside bracelets I had (which came directly from Robin):

IMG_6416.JPG

The other one went to Steven Howearth of popculturemaven.com, another Pinsider at Comic-Con.

One day down, four more to go. *phew*

#69 3 years ago

Still not home, but figured I'd mention a massive Comic-Con picto-post that just went live on my website:

http://www.elephanteater.com/11042

...until the next Swinger update.

#70 3 years ago

Nice pics! Didn't realize you were so famous!

#71 3 years ago

Jet planes, islands, tigers on a gold leash.

#72 3 years ago

Really cool restore, you're doing a great job!

About those coil stops. The reason they have that weird profile with the ring in the middle, etc. is because on EM games the coils are run by AC power instead of DC power and the copper in the coil stop makes the coil not 'buzz' when the plunger is pulled all the way in, up against the coil stop. I'm not positive if they were originally flat, because I've never seen any that weren't at least 35 years old!

#73 3 years ago
Quoted from LyonsRonnie1:

Really cool restore, you're doing a great job!

Many thanks, LyonsRonnie1. It's my first EM restore and, as you can see from this thread, I'm receiving A LOT of help. I'd be hosed if it weren't for many of the gentlefolk chiming in on this thread.

Speaking of which:

Quoted from LyonsRonnie1:

About those coil stops. The reason they have that weird profile with the ring in the middle, etc. is because on EM games the coils are run by AC power instead of DC power and the copper in the coil stop makes the coil not 'buzz' when the plunger is pulled all the way in, up against the coil stop. I'm not positive if they were originally flat, because I've never seen any that weren't at least 35 years old!

Very interesting! Great to know, and thanks for contributing to my EM education!

Sincerely,
Ryan Claytor
Elephant Eater Comics
www.ElephantEater.com

1 week later
#74 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

See you back here in a month or so

Hello, again.

After back-to-back out-of-state convention weekends...

- Comic-Con International: http://www.elephanteater.com/11042

- Small Press and Alternative Comics Expo (S.P.A.C.E.): http://www.elephanteater.com/11050

...I finally had a chance to dig into ole' Swingy again. For all intents and purposes, the back box is complete, so I'm moving onto the cabinet.

IMG_6923.jpg

This posed a particular challenge:

IMG_6919.jpg

Mold...or something...

IMG_6920.jpg

I'm not exactly sure what it is, but I'm going to call it mildew for the rest of this post just to give myself a naive sense of security about my life expectancy after cleaning it.

So, I went about carefully removing Jones plugs...

IMG_6928.jpg

...and unscrewing the bottom board screws...

IMG_6934.jpg

IMG_6935.jpg

...so that I could take that mess out of the cabinet and work on it a little easier.

IMG_6936.jpg

In case I haven't mentioned my goal here, it's to strip the bottom board of all its components, sand away all the mold--er, I mean...MILDEW(!!!) and then reassemble.

As usual, this new (for me) process totally frightened me, but the bottom board removal was pretty easy (seriously, two screws and some Jones plugs, and out it came). I also took a million pictures before and during disassembly from every possible angle and step of deconstruction. During this time, I also did my best to organize the various screws into labelled bags...

IMG_6998.jpg

...in order to make reassembly easier on myself.

#75 3 years ago

Hey, what do you know! There's a new 8 photo-per-post limit! Ha-ha! I'm going to assume that was instated because of me.

Alright, on with the update. So, part of the reason I'm detailing this process is to show folks new to the EM side of the hobby (like myself) that EM maintenance is something approachable. I certainly don't know everything, as is evident from my labeling system:

IMG_6942.jpg

...but I make due until someone educates me (which I'm hoping will happen in this case...what IS that thing, anyway?).

So, I continued unscrewing components until everything was loose on the bottom board. At that point, I did my best to slide everything off the board, in it's original orientation, and onto my working surface (the ground of my garage...note to self: get a work bench, my back is angry).

IMG_6956.jpg

From there, I pealed off and unstapled several labels (again, copious pictures have been shot for reference on where to re-adhere them).

IMG_6963.jpg

Now that the board was bare, I took it out for sanding.

IMG_6968.jpg

I propped it up, made sure to be upwind, mask on, and long-sleeve/pants in an effort to avoid inhaling any junk removed from the board.

IMG_6969.jpg

So, the sanding begins...

IMG_6970.jpg

The only spot left that wasn't pristine after some light sanding was underneath the transformer, as I couldn't figure out how to remove those four bolts (no recessed area to insert a screwdriver, completely SMOOTH BOLT-HEADS[!??!]) and my sander couldn't fit inside that little area...

IMG_6975.jpg

...so I did my best to hand-sand that portion.

IMG_6976.jpg

#76 3 years ago

So this is what I ended up with.

IMG_6978.jpg

Surprisingly, the bottom of the bottom board wasn't too shabby, just a bit discolored:

IMG_6977.jpg

Not that anyone will ever see the bottom of the bottom board, but I figured I'd give it a brief sand while I had it out.

IMG_6979.jpg

As you can see above, I knocked it back a bit, but didn't want to take off too much wood. Good enough for my tastes.

Moving on! Back in the garage, the bottom board is ready for reassembly...

IMG_6980.jpg

...but I wanted to clean the components a bit before screwing them back onto the bottom board, just to keep it as clean as possible. Surprisingly enough, the components' feet were pretty clean already! Here's the bottom of the transformer (pardon the garage backlighting):

IMG_6987.jpg

But others needed a little elbow grease.

IMG_6989.jpg

I used a rag with some 91% isopropyl alcohol...

IMG_6990.jpg

...which worked reasonably well...

IMG_6991.jpg

...although. my guess is there are better products to use. Unfortunately, I didn't have them on-hand and was in a time-crunch to reassemble this by the end of the day. Adequate for now, I suppose, but I'd be happy to hear alternate suggestions for better cleaning solutions.

#77 3 years ago

Okay, so components are cleaned and ready to be re-attached to the bottom board. But you may remember this little mess:

IMG_6963.jpg

I really didn't want to reattach the cruddy lables, so I scanned in them:

fontCloseEnough1.jpg

Cleaned up an area of the font and uploaded it to an online font-finder (in this case, "What the Font" - http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ ...although I'm sure there are others, too):

whatTheFont.jpg

WTF showed me a couple examples that were close, but not perfect. It also wanted me to pay upwards of $70 for a font. In my opinion, not worth it. I used an existing font on my computer (Arial - Bold) which was also close but not perfect, with the added benefit of being free. Here's my comparison (original scan on the left with Arial Bold recreation on the right):

fontCloseEnough.jpg

Once again, good enough for me. Here's my remastered label:

fontCloseEnough2.jpg

I printed it (black and white lazerjet) on a sheet of bristol I had lying around (the preferred paper of comic book artists)...

unnamed.jpg

...as it mimicked the weight of the original cardstock nicely. Finally, here's the newly remastered, printed, and trimmed lablel underneath the relays as it was before:

IMG_7001.jpg

As I mentioned, I was pressed for time, so I didn't recreate the labels that weren't screwed underneath a mech.

LabelsBottomBoard.jpg

I figured I could always stick those atop the board on a different day.

#78 3 years ago

Finally, after all the components were screwed back onto the backboard, I gave the cabinet a quick cleaning. I was pleasantly surprised that there weren't any nests or carcasses (carcai? carcass'? carcassesesessssees?) under the bottom board. (I've heard horror stories.) In fact, I was really happy to see how clean it was despite how cruddy the bottom board above it had become!

IMG_6994.jpg

There was mainly a thin covering of dust and some very light "mildew." (Again, I donned a mask and long everything as I cleaned this. Not the most pleasurable precaution in 90 degree weather, but better that than mold-cancer.)

In addition to a quarter (Woo-hoo!!!) I also pulled out a little pile of junk:

IMG_6995.jpg

...from which I salvaged these:

IMG_6996.jpg

I'm not certain what they're for, but I assume they belong to parts on the playfield. I filed them away in another plastic baggie and stored them for a later date. In the meantime, here's the cleaned cabinet:

IMG_7002.jpg

...and here's the bottom board back in place.

IMG_7008.jpg

This was a solid day's work for me, but that was largely due to the fact that I was cobbling together a make-shift work space:

IMG_6981.jpg

...and pulling supplies from seemingly every room in the house. I'd love to have a dedicated work area that I could stock with restoration necessities, but we moved into our house a year ago, and while largely settled, we're still ironing out where everything will go. Anyhow, another task completed.

Until next time!

#79 3 years ago

Man, that was a lot of work. When a bottom board is that bad I just pull it from the game, mean green it, hose it down good, and let it sit out for a few days to dry.

I cover the transformer. Don't want it to get wet.

#80 3 years ago

Great work-
The coggy thing is the score motor-
The screw you pulled from the bottom that has the sharp pointed tip is a lock screw for the flipper shaft- the other stuff might possibly be from stepper unit rivets or possibly a target on the playfield- but I would guess stepper units. I would look at those carefully to be sure you have contacts everywhere your supposed to- the game will absolutely not play correctly (but could be as subtle as a light not lighting or something like that) if you missing contacts anywhere.

Looking really good- congratulations on a great job saving that part of the game. And best wishes during your recovery from black lung

#81 3 years ago
Quoted from FrankJ:

Man, that was a lot of work.

My initial estimate was a couple of hours. 7 hours later...

Quoted from FrankJ:

When a bottom board is that bad I just pull it from the game, mean green it, hose it down good, and let it sit out for a few days to dry.

...is that an accepted practice?

Quoted from rufessor:

The coggy thing is the score motor-

Quoted from rufessor:

The screw you pulled from the bottom that has the sharp pointed tip is a lock screw for the flipper shaft

Quoted from rufessor:

the other stuff might possibly be from stepper unit rivets

(Yay, knowledge!!!)

I'll have to take another look at the units with rivets when I have a moment.

Quoted from rufessor:

Looking really good- congratulations on a great job saving that part of the game.

Gracias!

Quoted from rufessor:

And best wishes during your recovery from black lung

Thanks for chiming in here, FrankJ and rufessor!

#82 3 years ago

You can mean green and hose or just hose, but stuff will get trapped under other stuff. You done good. Time constraints are no good (referring to your alcohol cleaning of the exposed metal) - I've got to retie my Twinky using waxed thread, but ziptied cause I was on a deadline. Almost 1 year later, guess what's still there?

Re: rivets, or as my phone wants to say, rovers- those are the brass type that are normally on a stepper, but they are longer than normally found on a stepper. I would suggest just hanging onto them until you start troubleshooting gameplay for now. May not be needed at all. We'll find out soon!

-Nick

#83 3 years ago
Quoted from bingopodcast:

You can mean green and hose or just hose, but stuff will get trapped under other stuff.

That'd be my fear, with all the little crevices I would think there'd be some trace dampness even if you let it dry. With my pre-existing "mildew" problem in this machine, I wouldn't want to do anything to coax it back into existence.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

Time constraints are no good

Agreed. Next work sesh I'll tell job/wife/kid where they can go.

Quoted from bingopodcast:

I would suggest just hanging onto them until you start troubleshooting gameplay for now.

Done!

Quoted from bingopodcast:

May not be needed at all. We'll find out soon!

In case anyone has forgotten, Nick has been my CEO (Chief Electromechanical Officer) on this project. I've had a lot of help getting this project to the point it is now, but I can assure you it wouldn't be half the pile of parts you currently see without his help. Many thanks, Nick.

Also, it's probably about time for my periodic Nick Baldridge show plug: http://foramusementonly.libsyn.com/

If you've read eighty-some-odd posts of this thread, you'll love this -------^^^^^^^^

forAmusementOnly.jpg

#84 3 years ago

Give me a moldy machine, one that has been drenched in lube, or mouse pee and I'll Mean Green and hose it every time. I still clean, tighten, and adjust every set of points while the board is out of the game.

Common practice, no. I've probably done it to 10-20 of the hundred's of games I've owned. Some games were abused to the point that a severe method is necessary. As moldy as your game appeared, I would have done it.

#85 3 years ago

Today, I moved the cabinet back into my basement (from the garage after the bottom board sanding) and actually stood it up on legs for the first time.

IMG_7034.jpg

I think I'm done with the cabinet stuff for the time being and will be moving onto stripping down the playfield goodies for a good cleaning. But before I started, I took one final look at the bottom board (...to admire my handy-work? ...to inspect after moving? I'm not really sure why I did it).

IMG_7035.jpg

...but when I did, I noticed something odd:

IMG_7036.jpg

Those 3 central relays you see two images above WERE NOT SCREWED ONTO THE BOTTOM BOARD!!!

I guess that would explain the bag of extra screws I had from my bottom board experience. Unfortunately, there weren't ENOUGH screws left in the bag.

So off to the big-box hardware store I went.

IMG_7076.jpg

With everything right in the world of the bottom board's neglected relays (screwed back in place with another...

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

newly remastered, printed, and trimmed lablel underneath

IMG_7092.jpg

...I could then move onto the playfield, which looked something like this:

IMG_7037.jpg

As I inspected and shot another gajillion images for my how-to-put-this-thing-back-together visual manual, I was reminded of the inventive rubbering job on this hard-ridden beast.

IMG_7052.jpg

#86 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I was reminded of the inventive rubbering job on this hard-ridden beast.

Oh yeah. That's good stuff. Intentional double entendre?

#87 3 years ago

So my first item of playfield stripping business was to take off all the plastics:

IMG_7077.jpg

Followed by all the posts:

IMG_7093.jpg

I showed my wife these pictures, who has also seen the playfield first-hand, and she remarked at how nice the pictures made the playfield look, when in reality it needs quite a bit of cleaning:

IMG_7055.jpg

When finished stripping the plastics and posts, I had a lovely pile of mismatched keepsakes.

IMG_7062.jpg

And of course, my usual bags of labeled parts to help me with the ever-fear-inducing task of getting things back together the way I found them.

IMG_7094.jpg

That's basically where things sit as of today. I did run across a question for any EM aficionados in the group here. It's something I spotted when pulling up one of the plastics:

IMG_7056.jpg

A finishing nail under the plastic(!??!)

IMG_7059.jpg

I thought this may have just been another odd hack to add to the list on this machine. I mean, if you look where the nail is in the playfield, it almost appears as though there used to be a post in its place, due to the circular indentations around the nail. However, the opposite plastic had the same thing, a nail driven into the playfield to just about the height of the plastic. Unfortunately, this particular nail was starting to take off the artwork on the plastic above:

IMG_7057.jpg

So, any thoughts on that? It doesn't seem like it is needed to support the plastic, which is the only (somewhat) reasonable explanation I could think of as to why they may have been put there originally in the factory. Anyhow, I'll be interested to hear from someone more knowledgable on this subject.

#88 3 years ago

It's factory - not to support the plastic, but to prevent ball traps. It is one of the titular pins in pinball.
You'll notice there's a mate behind each stand up switch covered by a rubber. This is to prevent the bal from getting trapped behind the switch in the event the rubber gives way.

#89 3 years ago

BTW, you'll want to take off the flippers and bumpers, apron and arch to do your big clean.

#90 3 years ago
Quoted from bingopodcast:

It's factory ... This is to prevent the bal from getting trapped behind the switch in the event the rubber gives way.

Huh! Kind of odd. Maybe it's just me, but I'm looking at that configuration under the plastic and I'm not seeing how it would do a ton of good. I'm considering not replacing it after pulling it out. Keeping in mind this machine will be in a home environment with rubbers kept up so as to not "give way."

At that point, is there any reason taking-out the under-plastic nail completely would be a bad idea?

#91 3 years ago
Quoted from bingopodcast:

BTW, you'll want to take off the flippers and bumpers, apron and arch to do your big clean.

I promise.

#92 3 years ago
Quoted from Mk1Mod0:

Intentional double entendre?

Wha--?

#93 3 years ago
Quoted from FrankJ:

Give me a moldy machine, one that has been drenched in lube, or mouse pee and I'll Mean Green and hose it every time.

Wows! I swear I'm not judging. Just learning. (EM noob, here.) I woulda never thought...

Quoted from FrankJ:

Common practice, no. I've probably done it to 10-20 of the hundred's of games I've owned. Some games were abused to the point that a severe method is necessary. As moldy as your game appeared, I would have done it.

Hm! I'll keep this in mind for my next barn-rescue. Thanks, FrankJ.

#94 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

At that point, is there any reason taking-out the under-plastic nail completely would be a bad idea?

Yeah, I would leave it. If it is rubbing the art, either the wrong posts were used, or the nail has backed out.

My suggestion: remove it to do your initial cleaning, then tap it in slightly further to prevent further wear.

The nails serve a purpose even with amazing upkeep. I wouldn't remove them, anyway. Your game, up to you, but they are there for a reason.

#95 3 years ago

Hi Ryan! Great thread. It's inspiring me to tackle my project non working FOUR player machine.. I wish it was a one player but it's the only non working machine "project" machine I have..

I have questions after reading your thread..

1. Why choose an EM and why choose this machine? Your other thread stated you didn't want to use an EM?

2. Did you file or clean the contacts while working on them? Inquiring minds want to know.

3. If you're planning to clean the playfield then I'm making an educated guess here that you're not planning to replace the original PF art with yours?

I have an idea for a pin retheme but mum's the word what it is.

Bruce

#96 3 years ago

Thanks, Bruce! Much appreciated.

Quoted from PinballFever:

It's inspiring me to tackle my project non working FOUR player machine.

Even better!!!

Quoted from PinballFever:

1a. Why choose an EM and why choose this machine?

Well...

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

It seemed like the perfect fit for my first attempt at a re-theme for a few reasons:
A) It's a fun game with lots to do (moving target in center of playfield, up-post between flippers, kick-back in the left outlane, ball return gate in the right outlane, etc)
B) While it's a fun game, the art package is a lack-luster phone-in by Christian Marche, so I won't feel bad sanding it down to put my own art in it's place.
C) Re-theming an EM seems like a more managable project, as I'll be able to mainly focus on the fun stuff: ART (not sound, modifying displays, coding rules, and other technical things that frighten artists)

Quoted from PinballFever:

1b. Your other thread stated you didn't want to use an EM?

I'm racking my brain and can't remember saying such a thing. I'm happy to be proven wrong though, it happens often.

Quoted from PinballFever:

2. Did you file or clean the contacts while working on them?

Not yet!

Quoted from PinballFever:

3. If you're planning to clean the playfield then I'm making an educated guess here that you're not planning to replace the original PF art with yours?

A fine assumption, but I DO plan on sanding down the PF and putting my own art on it. I'm going through the whole teardown and playfield cleaning process just to make sure I can get all this in working order. I'll play it for a while and hopefully hone my re-theme ideas. I already have a theme firmly in mind, but just want to make sure I understand gameplay/ball-travel/etc before relabeling various mechanics/rules/toys.

Thanks for stopping by, Bruce!

#97 3 years ago

Just a quick one today. Last eveing I had barely enough time to start digging into flipper disassembly. This is what I found on the left flipper mech:

IMG_7109.jpg

Correct me if I'm wrong, but that flipper coil looks mighty toasty.

IMG_7110.jpg

...and that bushing...

IMG_7111.jpg

OH! ...that bushing. LOL

Obviously a questionable attempt to secure a broken bushing with the metal (leather, paper, I'm not sure yet) wrapped around the bushing, but it's also broken and glued(?) at the base of the cylinder of the bushing. ...just sort of wobbling around with some sticky substance visible as it shifts.

Anyhow, the right flipper bushing also has it's own issue:

IMG_7115.jpg

That's all the news I have for this mini-update.

#98 3 years ago

I saw that which is why I asked...

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

I'm racking my brain and can't remember saying such a thing.

I was looking through topics started by you and saw this thread from 3 years ago..

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/best-pin-to-re-theme

where you said...

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

However, I am not a big fan of EM machines *cringe* (sorry EM guys), so let's leave those out of the equation.

and that's where I wondered when you changed your mind about an EM for this retheme and why..

Bruce

#99 3 years ago
Quoted from RyanClaytor:

OH! ...that bushing. LOL

Yep. Replace both of those bad boys. Interesting... the ones on my game were hammered through the play field from the top as a kind of nail with threads looking deal and then the bushings were held to the bottom with nylock nuts. Yours appear to be merely screwed in from the bottom. I am sure someone else will say if that is correct or not.

Quoted from RyanClaytor:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but that flipper coil looks mighty toasty.

Indeed it does, but it could be old stained paper too. As you are working the bottom of the playfield, disassemble and clean the whole mech and as you do check the soldering job on the lugs, the gap of the EOS switch, etc. Several things can cause that coil to get extra crispy. (Along with oh, say 20-30 years of play!) It's amazing how snappy those things get with just some TLC.

#100 3 years ago
Quoted from PinballFever:

and that's where I wondered when you changed your mind about an EM for this retheme and why..

Bruce

Scorch! Stupid internet...

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