(Topic ID: 235572)

Williams Road Kings issues


By JT-Pinball

4 months ago



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  • 14 posts
  • 5 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 months ago by acebathound
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#1 4 months ago

I am working on a Road Kings that has a couple of issue. First the ball lock by the detour keeps firing when you turn on the game. I guess it may be a symptom of the second. The bottom pop the two white wires were cut from the switch matrix. The corresponding driver transistor was blown. The transistor was replaced as well as the coil that test bad but when hooked up it blows the transistor. MPU seems to boot with no errors. I’m guessing there is a short somewhere?

#2 4 months ago
Quoted from JT-Pinball:

I’m guessing there is a short somewhere?

Don't guess. Do some troubleshooting. First, read the repair docs and PinWiki. Pops are "Special Solenoids", and on an early System 11 like Road Kings, the activation switches can cause pops to be stuck on, blowing your driver transistor and/or circuit. There are separate switches for the scoring that show up in the switch matrix tests.

There is a section here that details the Special Solenoids:
http://techniek.flipperwinkel.nl/wms11/index1.htm#intro

http://pinwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Williams_System_9_-_11

#3 4 months ago

Ball lock issue sounds like the switch is stuck closed. Go into switch levels test and see if it comes up. If so, just adjust the leaf switch so it only touches when the ball is in the saucer.

#4 4 months ago
Quoted from Pinwizkid:

Ball lock issue sounds like the switch is stuck closed. Go into switch levels test and see if it comes up. If so, just adjust the leaf switch so it only touches when the ball is in the saucer.

It’s a micro switch. The switch test good. The saucer starts to fire bang bang bang the minute you turn the game on.

#5 4 months ago
Quoted from wayout440:

Don't guess. Do some troubleshooting. First, read the repair docs and PinWiki. Pops are "Special Solenoids", and on an early System 11 like Road Kings, the activation switches can cause pops to be stuck on, blowing your driver transistor and/or circuit. There are separate switches for the scoring that show up in the switch matrix tests.
There is a section here that details the Special Solenoids:
http://techniek.flipperwinkel.nl/wms11/index1.htm#intro
http://pinwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Williams_System_9_-_11

The pop dose not score when hit either

#6 4 months ago
Quoted from JT-Pinball:

The pop dose not score when hit either

The pop has to fire first to be able to score. The spoon switch is operated by the ball hitting the spoon switch which triggers the coil to fire. The scoring switch is tripped by a cam. Not certain on road kings, but most look something like this:

images (resized).jpg
#7 4 months ago
Quoted from JT-Pinball:

It’s a micro switch. The switch test good. The saucer starts to fire bang bang bang the minute you turn the game on.

Repeated firing instead of constant lock on sounds like you may have a logic problem. Any corrosion on the mainboard? Some clear pics might help.

#8 4 months ago

Let me work on some pics. The batteries have been removed and NVRAM installed. There is a socket it U25 I can also see some signs of corosion around U41 and Q 39 and and the transistors there. Its not bad but it’s there

#9 4 months ago
image (resized).jpgimage (resized).jpg
#10 4 months ago

There appears to be a lot of corrosion and a lot of components that need to be replaced. They all need to be removed and the board sanded or bead blasted (there is a lengthy process for this)

If you can get the board working properly without addressing the corrosion, it is not likely to last in the long haul.

#11 4 months ago
Quoted from wayout440:

There appears to be a lot of corrosion and a lot of components that need to be replaced. They all need to be removed and the board sanded or bead blasted (there is a lengthy process for this)
If you can get the board working properly without addressing the corrosion, it is not likely to last in the long haul.

I agree. Who is doing this work right now that can get this turned and back to me?

#12 4 months ago

I could pull the parts and neutralize the alkaline damage but I have no way to test the whole board. I would like to have this done by someone who can test the board so when I get it back I know it’s fixed.

#13 4 months ago
Quoted from JT-Pinball:

It’s a micro switch. The switch test good. The saucer starts to fire bang bang bang the minute you turn the game on.

the switch tests good with a meter and the game off I assume? Go into the switch test in the diagnostics. (this should stop the saucer from firing) Go into the "active" switch test and see which switches are registering. Take the balls out of the trough, try it again with the balls in the trough. Could be something blown in the switch matrix or a incorrectly wired switch or switch diode.

#14 4 months ago
Quoted from JT-Pinball:

I could pull the parts and neutralize the alkaline damage but I have no way to test the whole board. I would like to have this done by someone who can test the board so when I get it back I know it’s fixed.

Hmm, that's a toss up then I think. It may be more cost effective and better for long-term reliability to get a new/refurbished board that wasn't hit like your board. Those thin traces that run up from the PIAs (and from the bottom PIA snaked through the top PIA through-holes) often don't survive and wire jumpers have to be stitched in. There's probably 3-5+ hours of work there, plus time testing the board. I know some guys do flat rate quotes, but I'd think at least $200+ to repair it. But even if repaired & tested, it's still not necessarily a guarantee it won't have issues at some point down the road.

There's portable test equipment available for testing these boards that's relatively cheap in the long-run if you'll be doing other repairs over time, but just depends how heavy you want to get into repair yourself. If you'd rather not deal with the repair / testing of the board at all, your options may be outlay of $200-250+ to have it repaired by someone or to buy a new board or refurbished board in better shape. Upside is, if you don't mind dealing with shipping a board, someone would probably pay something for your current board to offset some of those costs.

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