(Topic ID: 278681)

Why suddenly are only deep games considered good?

By jorant

1 year ago


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  • 64 posts
  • 46 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by koji
  • Topic is favorited by 4 Pinsiders

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    There are 64 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.
    #51 1 year ago

    ste games suck. Unless you have a nagging wife or something like that. Even then, they still suck, but it is better than facing her wrath.

    #52 1 year ago

    "Why suddenly are only deep games considered good?" I have been asking myself that for a while now. But I think it should be rephrased to "Why suddenly are only deep games considered sellable?"

    I wish somebody would show off by making a game where the mechanical action speaks for itself.

    When I think of it, what is a deep game? Some of the comtemporary games may be deep, as in having far stretch goals, but they are also barebone complicated at the start of ball 1. With progressive scoring, scoring dependancies, multipliers and perks (now ramps are 5X for the rest of the game, user selections etc.).

    I think this developement is fueled by a number of matters.

    It is easier to program games now a days. Boldly stated. The developement system and the resources on the system are at least beefier.

    The television in the backbox is able to show more stuff. So, it is too tempting to just keep filling on. Again boldly stated. But it feels that way, don't it.

    Game reveals, social media comm, podcasts etc. pushes the more is better approach. The more they have to talk about, the more they talk. Helps to shine value-for-money on a product.

    Some designers think big. They like these kind of games. They build the games they like.

    #53 1 year ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    ste games suck.

    What are ste games?

    #54 1 year ago

    I like both kind of games. I love my BSD if I just want to play some shorter and simpler rounds of pinball. If I got time and want to go deep I play my JP2.

    But I agree. for home use I prefer games with deeper rulesets. If they have simpler ones they have to be very good. On the other hand I like to play shallower games with friends that are harder. I don't want to have them stand around 40 mins and watch me play before they play their 1min ball.

    #55 1 year ago

    Funny thing is I’ve been lamenting this recent push of more simple games since Munsters.

    #56 1 year ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    ste games suck. Unless you have a nagging wife or something like that. Even then, they still suck, but it is better than facing her wrath.

    Noone likes ste games

    #57 1 year ago
    Quoted from Hazoff:

    What are ste games?

    I think STE stands for "sexually transmitted entertainment", but I'm not exactly sure.

    #58 1 year ago
    Quoted from Hazoff:

    What are ste games?

    2966A7D4-F3F9-49E8-BDA2-194E8A675D8C (resized).png
    #59 1 year ago

    For me it’s all about the elegant designs and simple brilliance of Nyens, Zale, H Williams, Mabs and Krynski... clear objectives, but if set up correctly, almost impossible to achieve regularly.

    It’s much easier to enter the flow while playing these “simple” games. I don’t mean the flow of shooting a ball and it returning to your flipper to make another shot, I mean the psychological usage of the term, as extolled by Csikszentmihalyi, that we can lessen our mental chaos by providing/creating a structure for our mental energies to play in.

    I still enjoy playing the complicated modern games, but, I’ve found that I’m more drawn to a rudimentary and “soulful” approach to things that I do for enjoyment. World rather surf a long sand point than a wedging reef, ski a powder line than a half pipe, ride an air cooled BMW than a crotch rocket, dig into a single player Woodrail or wedge head than fret about stacking multipliers and convoluted modes/rules in a modern deep game..

    Ha, well that’s my morning coffee take on the matter.

    #60 1 year ago
    Quoted from Hazoff:

    What are ste games?

    He's about a day late making fun of my typo I made and corrected. High brow stuff.

    #61 1 year ago
    Quoted from jorant:

    I am just back and forth on what I want my next game to be. Being a relatively poor man in the hobby, it takes a lot of deliberation for me. A huge part of me wants monster bash or afm next, if not for myself but for guests that come over. Everyone that comes play pinball flocks to woz, but trying to tell them the rules is almost embarrassing lol. I figured now that I have 2 deep games and 2 semi-deep games, now would be a good time to get one that takes two seconds to understand.

    Spiderman is the game in my collection that non-pinheads like to play. Lots of accidental shots made. Sandman up front is easy to understand. Same goes for doc oc. I like it more than AFM. On a side note... "poor man in the hobby". You have like 25K worth of games!

    #62 1 year ago
    Quoted from jorant:

    He's about a day late making fun of my typo I made and corrected. High brow stuff.

    Well, you try to come up with new material at 2:00 AM when you found you were already kicked out of the other thread you were poking fun at.

    #63 1 year ago
    Quoted from Saddath:

    I like both kind of games. I love my BSD if I just want to play some shorter and simpler rounds of pinball. If I got time and want to go deep I play my JP2.
    But I agree. for home use I prefer games with deeper rulesets. If they have simpler ones they have to be very good. On the other hand I like to play shallower games with friends that are harder. I don't want to have them stand around 40 mins and watch me play before they play their 1min ball.

    40 min for 1 ball? That does not sound at all.

    #64 1 year ago
    Quoted from BeachPickle:

    For me it’s all about the elegant designs and simple brilliance of Nyens, Zale, H Williams, Mabs and Krynski... clear objectives, but if set up correctly, almost impossible to achieve regularly.
    It’s much easier to enter the flow while playing these “simple” games. I don’t mean the flow of shooting a ball and it returning to your flipper to make another shot, I mean the psychological usage of the term, as extolled by Csikszentmihalyi, that we can lessen our mental chaos by providing/creating a structure for our mental energies to play in.
    I still enjoy playing the complicated modern games, but, I’ve found that I’m more drawn to a rudimentary and “soulful” approach to things that I do for enjoyment. World rather surf a long sand point than a wedging reef, ski a powder line than a half pipe, ride an air cooled BMW than a crotch rocket, dig into a single player Woodrail or wedge head than fret about stacking multipliers and convoluted modes/rules in a modern deep game..
    Ha, well that’s my morning coffee take on the matter.

    Thank you for this! It articulates my exact sentiment much more constructively and succinctly than would occur to me with my morning joe.

    There are 64 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.

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