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(Topic ID: 139834)

Where to buy security bar for coin door?


By NorCalRealtor

5 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 25 posts
  • 14 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 22 days ago by KenLayton
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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#1 5 years ago

Hi guys,
I put my first game on location a couple weeks ago, a Flash Gordon, and noticed it's the only pin there with no security bar. Where can I buy one? Is there a particular one I should get for this era of pin? The pin already has a hole drilled on each side of the coin door, so it would be nice if I could simply work with those holes.

#2 5 years ago

There must be plenty of those lying around some where.

#3 5 years ago

I have a pile of them, cause I dispise them, I run a route and take them off all my games that they are one before I put them out. if you want to pay shipping you are more then welcome to them.

#4 5 years ago

also ask yourself, is drilling two large holes to mount the thing, worth it to your machine?

#6 5 years ago
Quoted from Dr-Willy:

also ask yourself, is drilling two large holes to mount the thing, worth it to your machine?

The holes were already there according to the OP.

#7 5 years ago

Thanks, guys! That Happ one looks perfect, but the site won't let me order it without spending $200

PM sent to Shuyler

#8 5 years ago

Happ told me $200.00 for web site orders and $500.00 for phone orders. They can go F%%% themselves. Joe

#9 5 years ago

A-1 Security Bars makes bars for all types of coin operated equipment, including pinball machines and arcade video games:

http://www.a1securitybars.com/

http://www.amusementdistributors.com/?main_page=index&manufacturers_id=73

http://www.twistedquarter.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=155_162

#10 5 years ago

"Happ told me $200.00 for web site orders and $500.00 for phone orders. They can go F%%% themselves. Joe"
Interesting info Joe. Thank you! My last order from them was nearly $400 for a joystick if I recall. I was still glad they had it but I won't bother looking there in the future for small stuff. The Joystick was well worth it fyi!

#11 5 years ago

We recently found out about the minimum order quantity at HAPP and that's crazy! Could barely afford the $200. They really are shooting themselves in the foot over this one.

#12 5 years ago

If you really need a Happ product you could look up their product number and place an order with Betson. I don't know how much Betson is going to add on to the price. Joe

#13 5 years ago

if someone wants the money they will get it, not even that bar will stop them. it might scare off some people, but then again it might also draw some to it as in geez why such a big ass lock how much money does that thing have?. they will even cut open the cabinet to get at it... if a location is that dodgy u might think twice about putting a pin there in the first place.

here is a video of tim arnold talking about how someone messed up a whirlwind with a axe, cause the security bar was there installed.

#14 5 years ago

A better way to go about is to drill the cabinet and put a smaller 5"-ish bar around the original lock and loop it though a padlock ring. I help maintain some games at a 24/7 laundromat and while they have been busted into several times over the years, fortunately we've never had major damage like smashed glass or chopped up cabinets and one reason for that is because we don't use full-size security bars. The place has 16 internet connected cameras that can be accessed from any device and someone staying in the morning hours so that may be a big reason why also.

4 years later
#15 47 days ago

Can someone tell me why this lock (which I assume is there for a security bar) has switches installed?

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#16 47 days ago
Quoted from dluth:

Can someone tell me why this lock (which I assume is there for a security bar) has switches installed?
[quoted image][quoted image]

To hook it up to the high voltage circuit?

#18 46 days ago
Quoted from dluth:

Can someone tell me why this lock (which I assume is there for a security bar) has switches installed?
[quoted image][quoted image]

For an alarm system.

3 weeks later
#19 22 days ago
Quoted from KenLayton:

For an alarm system.

For real? Is this common? How does it work?

#20 22 days ago
Quoted from dluth:

For real? Is this common? How does it work?

Yes, many operators did this. They used a nice loud portable alarm system that ran on a 12 volt lantern battery. It would go off as soon as the coin door was opened. Hopefully to catch or deter a crook. When the route money collector came through to collect the money out of the machine, he would use his alarm system key in that lock to shut off the alarm system while the collection was taking place. When the collector was ready to leave, he'd turn it back on again. The alarm system was portable and sat inside the machine in a convenient place. All the person installing needed to do was drill a hole for the alarm on-off switch.

When it came to to remove the alarm system, the operator simply filled the hole for the lock with a large carriage bolt and no one was the wiser. Back in the day, Wico and other big amusement parts suppliers sold these portable alarm systems.

#21 22 days ago

I have a old juke (rock ola) that used a trigger plate for those air horns you see people use at football games, If you move cashbox WWWWWAAAAA... It was an option for that machine that is not even in the manual and aparently not many people bought them, because they are super hard to find....It took me years to understand what I was even looking at.

#22 22 days ago
Quoted from KenLayton:

Yes, many operators did this. They used a nice loud portable alarm system that ran on a 12 volt lantern battery. It would go off as soon as the coin door was opened. Hopefully to catch or deter a crook. When the route money collector came through to collect the money out of the machine, he would use his alarm system key in that lock to shut off the alarm system while the collection was taking place. When the collector was ready to leave, he'd turn it back on again. The alarm system was portable and sat inside the machine in a convenient place. All the person installing needed to do was drill a hole for the alarm on-off switch.
When it came to to remove the alarm system, the operator simply filled the hole for the lock with a large carriage bolt and no one was the wiser. Back in the day, Wico and other big amusement parts suppliers sold these portable alarm systems.

Thanks, that’s interesting stuff! For what it’s worth, I believe this was a French sited machine. I’m going to have to fill it with a piece of dowel or something as I’m putting on some new decals.
Do you think this piece of metal screwed to the side of the cabinet was involved in the alarm? It doesn’t have any other function I can see.

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#23 22 days ago

Nope. That looks like it keeps tension on the flipper opto actuator. Those actuators lose tension over time and that looks like an operator quick fix.

#24 22 days ago
Quoted from Passave:

I have a old juke (rock ola) that used a trigger plate for those air horns you see people use at football games, If you move cashbox WWWWWAAAAA... It was an option for that machine that is not even in the manual and aparently not many people bought them, because they are super hard to find....It took me years to understand what I was even looking at.

Also, the large Rowe change machines had the air horn alarm that activated as crooks tried to pry the door open with a wrecking bar. If the lock was properly opened. the locking rods/bolts moved away from the wood lever that activated the air horn. No battery required...

#25 22 days ago
Quoted from MrBally:

Also, the large Rowe change machines had the air horn alarm that activated as crooks tried to pry the door open with a wrecking bar. If the lock was properly opened. the locking rods/bolts moved away from the wood lever that activated the air horn. No battery required...

That air horn was also an option for Rowe jukeboxes from models MM3 (1968) and up through CD100 machines. Once triggered from a break-in attempt, that air horn would not stop until the can was emptied (it was very loud too).

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