(Topic ID: 240550)

What’s to best way to store pins?


By transprtr4u

10 months ago



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  • 15 posts
  • 13 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 10 months ago by CollinT
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#1 10 months ago

Have room for 3 pins and now I’m up to seven. Thinking about storing a couple in the garage.if I remove the batteries and plastic wrap the the games, how would they fair in a garage that’s not climate controlled?
Thanks in advance...

#2 10 months ago

Here is what Stern suggests in their manuals

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#3 10 months ago

Storing pins in an non-climate controlled environment and/or one subject to wide swings in temperature and humidity is not a good idea.

I would never store a pin I was interested in keeping in a garage.

#4 10 months ago

When storing any game, ensure when the game is disassembled, a WOOD PALLET is used to elevate the cabinet against floor moisture damage. Plastic wrap is unnecessary unless needed for transport, you can just throw old sheets over the games. There are NO problems storing in garages, unless the environment gets well below freezing, heat, and/or subject to extreme moisture or dry conditions. Overly dry or wet conditions lead to wood warpage or dry rot. General storage temperature listed above by Stern for guidance is accurate. Backglasses should be removed for long term care as they are much more sensitive to changes in temperature over time. This needs to be stressed as one bad winter can have devastating effects on ink screened glass due to peeling and cracking. I have stored games for decades without major issues, but it should be reminded that general overhauls are required when the games are placed back in operation. It makes no difference whether SS or EM, as things such as metal oxidation are present in both types of games, which includes the legs of IC circuit chips. Oxidation is not stopped by shrink wrapping. Storing pinball machines is like storing a more modern vehicle with electronic controls.

#5 10 months ago

I have had great success storing them in a dry auto shop wrapped in plastic, no batteries. Others just with a sheet over them have oxidation issues, but not the ones wrapped up.

I am in west Texas though, and it is the desert

#6 10 months ago

You should keep them at my house.

#7 10 months ago

This how you get raised inserts! Wrap that bad boy and you'll be ok. Climate controlled is best but as long as the humidity isnt crazy high it should be fine. Just remove those batteries!

#9 10 months ago

Attach all 4 legs. Place the machine in the desired location with the non-attached end of the legs pointing downwards. Next, adjust the head so it is extending in the direction opposite the legs. Usually there is a latch on the back that will hold the head in the storage position (but older machines have bolts inside the head that need to be installed). The power cord has prongs on the end that need to be protected from getting crushed, wet, etc. Look on the nearest wall until you find a set of holes that are in the same pattern as the prongs on the end of the cord. Push the prongs into the holes. Done.

#10 10 months ago

Would Silica Packs inside the games also add some protection?
Thanks to all again

#11 10 months ago

So, if I'm seeing this right, it looks like someone, at some time, thought they could "water jet" their stern pinball machine such that Stern had to provide 3 separate sentences saying not to use a "water jet" on the pinball. That speaks volumes for the intelligence level of pinball owners.

#12 10 months ago
Quoted from transprtr4u:

Would Silica Packs inside the games also add some protection?
Thanks to all again

No. Even if you had enough to make a difference (a lot) that wouldn’t do anything to mitigate the temperature swings which are what will cause damage to the playfield and cabinet.

You might get lucky storing them in your garage. But that would be the absolutely last option I’d consider.

#13 10 months ago
Quoted from Gotpins:

So, if I'm seeing this right, it looks like someone, at some time, thought they could "water jet" their stern pinball machine such that Stern had to provide 3 separate sentences saying not to use a "water jet" on the pinball. That speaks volumes for the intelligence level of pinball owners.

Someone should ask this at their next presentation. You know, just to clarify.

#14 10 months ago

I can't wait for you all to read a new thread I'll start soon, I have a NIB stern game I bought that was stored improperly... it was badly damaged. Posting video and pics soon.. it will be a visual consequence to poor climate storage. I will also post a link here to that thread.. all the comments above are pretty spot on IMO.

#15 10 months ago
Quoted from ZEN:

I can't wait for you all to read a new thread I'll start soon, I have a NIB stern game I bought that was stored improperly... it was badly damaged. Posting video and pics soon.. it will be a visual consequence to poor climate storage. I will also post a link here to that thread.. all the comments above are pretty spot on IMO.

Looking forward to this

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