(Topic ID: 182078)

What is this cracking pattern?


By Darren_Sisco

2 years ago



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  • 12 posts
  • 7 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by vid1900
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#1 2 years ago

I've finished electrical and mechanical repairs on my Spy Hunter and started cleaning the playfield. I noticed in all three of my pinball playfields, this cracking action. I figure it must be wood grain? Is it acceptable if you don't feel it or is there a way to lessen its visual impact? The shiny image is before I used Novus 2. The matte image is after Novus 2, black touch up and before wax. Thanks, Darren

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#2 2 years ago

That's planking. It happens to a lot of older pins that have been improperly stored. As long as it doesn't chip it should be fine.

Have you read vid's guide?

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration#post-547752

It explains planking better than I can. Magic Eraser and clearcoat is the best fix.

#3 2 years ago
Quoted from dmbjunky:

That's planking. It happens to a lot of older pins that have been improperly stored. As long as it doesn't chip it should be fine.
Have you read vid's guide?
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration#post-547752
It explains planking better than I can. Magic Eraser and clearcoat is the best fix.

Thanks for the link. I didn't know what it was called.

#4 2 years ago

You can definitely wax it and play it like it is. All of my EMs are that way. If you ever decide to restore the playfield then would be the time to address it.

12
#5 2 years ago

As far as I was aware, that wasn't planking--just cracks in the topcoat due to age.

Planking usually shows as straight lines of raised paint. Basically, the wood grains swell, and push the paint off the surface of the playfield.

#6 2 years ago

Planking.

#7 2 years ago
Quoted from ForceFlow:

As far as I was aware, that wasn't planking--just cracks in the topcoat due to age.
Planking usually shows as straight lines of raised paint. Basically, the wood grains swell, and push the paint off the surface of the playfield.

Yep. Planking shows lines that follow the woodgrain from wood expansion, usually from environment factors.

The spider web cracking that you see on older games before clearcoat/Diamond Plate are from the lacquer wearing out, and dirt gets into all the little cracks and lines creating the visible wear that you see. Only way to clean that out is with an abrasive (like Magic Eraser), at which point you have removed the lacquer and are starting to get into the paint, so you need a new top surface to protect it, either mylar or clearcoat.

#8 2 years ago
Quoted from ForceFlow:

As far as I was aware, that wasn't planking--just cracks in the topcoat due to age.
Planking usually shows as straight lines of raised paint. Basically, the wood grains swell, and push the paint off the surface of the playfield.

I wanted to call it crazing at first but thought I was thinking of backglasses.

Thanks for the correction.

#9 2 years ago
Quoted from dmbjunky:

I wanted to call it crazing at first but thought I was thinking of backglasses.
Thanks for the correction.

I just got in my VM&P and magic erasers. Planking or no, I'll hit this with the new stuff and see what the results are. I want it as best looking for sale. I would be dreadfully upside down if I decide to do a full playfield restoration.

#10 2 years ago
Quoted from Darren_Sisco:

I just got in my VM&P and magic erasers. Planking or no, I'll hit this with the new stuff and see what the results are. I want it as best looking for sale. I would be dreadfully upside down if I decide to do a full playfield restoration.

If you're planning on selling, I wouldn't hit it with Magic Eraser. There's a good chance things will get worse unless you're willing to touch up and clear. Magic Eraser will take down the finish along with the dirt. If you really want to have a go at it, just go easy and don't go nuts with pressure.

#11 2 years ago

Your correct. I need to just wax it and let it go. I don't know how many times I have fallen for over-doing something just to make things worse.

#12 2 years ago

Unless you are going to clear coat the playfield, just wax it and leave it alone.

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