(Topic ID: 198874)

What is the definition of a toy on a playfield?


By BigT

1 year ago



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  • 30 posts
  • 18 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by Stones
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    #1 1 year ago

    I constantly see posts about the lack of toys on a playfield. Would like to see what everyone defines as a toy. In my opininion it is an object that interacts with the ball, for instance Thing in TAF, the Witch on WOZ, and the Snake on MET. These are just to name a few. Also what do you consider the pin with the most toys?

    #2 1 year ago

    Toys in pinball machines are basically off the shelf items added to games to appease the newer generation of collectors that grew up addicted to eating their meals out of a box.

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    #3 1 year ago

    Space Shuttle is often cited as the first real toy, but the ball doesn't interact with it at all

    #4 1 year ago

    Also before anyone calls me out, I realize that the Witch doesn’t interact with the ball but the magnets create the illusion that she does.

    #5 1 year ago

    if you want, you could make a distinction between interactive and non-interactive toys. there's certainly a wide gulf between Rudy and, say, the Toto doggie figurine that's screwed to the WOZ shooter lane rail. Are they both toys? I mean in broad terms, sure. but figurines bolted to the playfield aren't what people aren't usually talking about when they say "Stern games could use more toys" or whatever.

    So I think it makes sense to at least assume in pinball contexts when we mention toys we're talking about objects that are at least minimally interactive. but even then, there's grey areas -- for example, the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man on Ghostbusters is merely on a spring behind the playfield. the ball never hits it, and he isn't powered, but he wobbles when you nudge. does that count as interactive? what about a toy that simply lights up during a certain mode?

    #6 1 year ago

    O—din with your knowledge what was the first pin that introduced an object on the playfield that interacted with the ball outside of the normal items?

    #7 1 year ago
    Quoted from BigT:

    Also before anyone calls me out, I realize that the Witch doesn’t interact with the ball but the magnets create the illusion that she does.

    well, she goes up and down and yells at the player depending on what you do with the ball. i think that counts in my book.

    #8 1 year ago
    Quoted from BigT:

    Would like to see what everyone defines as a toy.

    Any decorative object on the playfield, which may either be interactive or static.

    #9 1 year ago
    Quoted from pezpunk:

    if you want, you could make a distinction between interactive and non-interactive toys. there's certainly a wide gulf between Rudy and, say, the Toto doggie figurine that's screwed to the WOZ shooter lane rail. Are they both toys? I mean in broad terms, sure. but figurines bolted to the playfield aren't what people aren't usually talking about when they say "Stern games could use more toys" or whatever.
    So I think it makes sense to at least assume in pinball contexts when we mention toys we're talking about objects that are at least minimally interactive. but even then, there's grey areas -- for example, the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man on Ghostbusters is merely on a spring behind the playfield. the ball never hits it, and he isn't powered, but he wobbles when you nudge. does that count as interactive? what about a toy that simply lights up during a certain mode?

    Pez, if it is bolted down and does nothing for the game than I think it is theme enhancement. Let’s look at IM, which in my opinion has a great toy iron monger, but is whiplash considered a toy?

    #10 1 year ago

    Monster Nash Dracula and Frankenstein... Medieval Madness castle... Cirquc Voltaire RingMaster...

    #11 1 year ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    Any decorative object on the playfield, which may either be interactive or static.

    Would you consider the wizard a toy on WOZ? He is decorative but in my opinion not a toy. Same as the the chair on TAF, decorative but not a toy.

    #12 1 year ago

    1951 Genco Stop n Go but I'm sure there was something before that.

    http://mirror2.ipdb.org/images/2388/Playfield_Detail.jpg

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    #13 1 year ago
    Quoted from BigT:

    Would you consider the wizard a toy on WOZ? He is decorative but in my opinion not a toy. Same as the the chair on TAF, decorative but not a toy.

    eh both of those things if i took em off the game and handed em to my kids would seem like a toy to them. but in spirit i think i agree with you - in pinball when we talk about toys, i think we usually are thinking about cool cranes and mouths and gates and magnets and things that interact with the ball. but i don't think you'll successfully nail down a specific definition. Space Shuttle is kinda considered the Toy that Saved Pinball and it doesn't really do anything.

    #14 1 year ago
    Quoted from BigT:

    O—din with your knowledge what was the first pin that introduced an object on the playfield that interacted with the ball outside of the normal items?

    That could go back to near day one.

    In 1947 Humpty Dumpty introduced flippers that at the time were not normal items. But their look served their purpose and didn't look like some oversized prize from a Cracker Jack box like so many today do.

    Like DennisDodel said there may have been some before but one of the first decorative interactive items on the playfield I know of were three colorful torsos on 1951's Minstrel Man that when you hit the target in front of them, they dropped into the playfield.

    Not overbearing, but functional.

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    #15 1 year ago

    Gottlieb Speedway. 1933.

    http://mirror2.ipdb.org/images/2282/Playfield.jpg

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    #16 1 year ago

    BBH buck running across play field

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    #17 1 year ago
    Quoted from BigT:

    Thing in TAF, the Witch on WOZ, and the Snake on MET. These are just to name a few. Also what do you consider the pin with the most toys?

    Quoted from RingMaster:

    Monster Nash Dracula and Frankenstein... Medieval Madness castle... Cirquc Voltaire RingMaster...

    Great question and I think it's becoming increasingly important that our community figure this out! I've never given it much thought but this is what I've come up with:

    -------------
    Class A toy: Direct interaction with ball - integrated with theme - even better if *unique* toy not seen before in pinball:

    - best example I can think of is WOZ spinning house with witch's leg mechanical animation when completed. Tight mechanical integration with theme, no expense spared (no one in accounting cut the legs), unique.

    - *Stern* TSPP: you enter house (upper playfield by opening garage door and then ball goes into house where you interact with TV to get ball onto sofa - original, tight theme integration, no expense spared.

    (Most from above posts):
    - Rudy from FH
    - Monster Bash Dracula and Frankenstein
    - Medieval Madness castle / AFM ship
    - Ringmaster in Cirquc Voltaire
    - gumball machine TZ
    - Thing in TAF

    -------------
    Class B toy: minimal interaction with ball, less or no mechanical theme integration

    - Witch in WOZ - which goes up and down so has (minor) mechanical element tied into movie but interaction is peripheral by use of magnet so I would say class B (not unique)
    - snake in MET pro

    -------------
    Class C toy: has no direct interaction with ball - if you removed it, mechanism functions the same (so just decoration basically).

    - TIE fighter in SW
    - stay puft marshmallow man in GB (mentioned in above post)

    *I have been thinking that we should, as a community, come up with a scoring system based on something like above to assign a "toy score" to games. Say 10 points for class A, 3 points for class B and 0.5 for class C toys.*

    Recent events are moving the slider of what mechanical pinball actually is and, for those of us in the community that care about such things, this score would be of interest.

    Finally, to answer question about what has most real toys, my vote would be for WOZ. Cheers.

    #18 1 year ago

    I think the menagerie ball on CV is a good example of a toy.

    It has an effect on the silverball like a magnet would.It's also a toy that will never break or fail.

    A simple idea done well.

    #19 1 year ago

    I side with the several Pinsiders who've distinguished between static-decorative and interactive, saying that interactivity is required for the thing to be a toy. IMO, a toy is something you play with, so it has to interact, at least minimally. On TSPP, the Homer head and the couch and the TV are toys, but the static Comic Book Guy and the Itchy and Scratchy figurines are environmental decor just like plastics and playfield art. They're basically "3-D" art.

    #20 1 year ago

    Here's a better shot of the Gtb. Speedway. Their second, larger version of the game. October 1933. Toy, moving cars.

    http://mirror2.ipdb.org/images/4932/image-3.jpg

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    #21 1 year ago

    You want a quantity of toys? Austin Powers has Fat Bastard with his toilet, a ramp to a ring magnet "Time Machine", Dr. Evil bash toy rising from the playfield, Spinning Austin on a scoop, a ball firing "Laser Beam", mini me spinner and of course Mr. Bigglesworth.

    #22 1 year ago
    Quoted from spinal:

    - TIE fighter in SW

    I agree, Sparky in MET is no different than the Tie Fighter so cool but an effect not a toy. Martians are an effect on AFM not toys.

    Thing is a top of the line toy like the Castle but I feel the jump rope on CP is an example of the perfect toy. The better you interact with it the better you do. What toy is better than the jump rope. Bring it.

    #23 1 year ago
    Quoted from DennisDodel:

    Here's a better shot of the Gtb. Speedway. Their second, larger version of the game. October 1933. Toy, moving cars.

    Darn kids and their toys.

    I think this thread has evolved more toward bash toys.

    Bally Fleet 1940. Hit the rotating cannons.

    http://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=877

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    #24 1 year ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    Any decorative object on the playfield, which may either be interactive or static.

    This Guy is good. Webster's Dictionary watch out.

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    #25 1 year ago

    c2632fe1b3820511a515d88f10f7bb20e2ec759d (resized).jpg

    Oh, sorry, you said toys on a playfield.

    #26 1 year ago

    That model cums with a shaker motor.

    #27 1 year ago
    Quoted from fosaisu:

    Oh, sorry, you said toys on a playfield.

    What an absolute bizarre picture !! And the title of the game is "Space Invaders" !!

    #28 1 year ago

    Good question. I met up with this toy concept when it seemed people referred to only the non-interactive devices on the playfield. Like figurines, dolls, and other decorative-only objects that your little sister might leave on the coffee table. Toy minus action equals toy. (Toy-action=toy.) Like those little jumpy rubbery critters on the Elvira games. Then along came Twilight Zone's huge gumball machine being called a toy but it was touched by the ball in play and so then I saw for me the slippery slope coming. On the IPDB I am hardly consistent from game to game, mostly just placing in the Toy field the figurines or playfield objects that are shaped like things in life you'd see existing outside of a pinball machine. But, but, if it's an action device, I've been listing it among the other action devices in the Notable Features like the flippers and such, so why list it again in the Toys field? Stern came along with a thing they called a Bash Toy but it really was to me a hugely fat standup target or, if it dropped into the playfield, a hugely fat drop target. Oh, great, I thought, did they have to call it a Toy? Action+toy=toy. Stern called it. Medieval Madness pop-up trolls are the same thing, hugely fat drop targets. Are they toys that your sister would play with?

    So, if interactive items can be toys, what's to say a pop bumper is not a toy? If you disagree because the only attached plastic piece is a boringly flat bumper cap, then what about the cooling tower bumper caps on Data East's The Simpsons? Or Heighway Pinball's Alien glowing egg caps? Would your little sister play with those? How untraditional to a pinball playfield does a plastic playfield thingie have to be before it becomes a toy? How unique to a production run will make it a toy? Is an aerial wire-strand habitrail a toy? Why or why not? Or the aerial tube on Xenon with the disco lights? It does the same thing.

    I'm just talking. I don't know. I'm interested in reading where other folks might draw the (fuzzy) line between interactive toys and other interactive playfield devices.

    #29 1 year ago

    It's a toy... that is on the play field.

    3 weeks later
    #30 1 year ago

    If its not on a spring....and it isnt a Tie Fighter.......its not a true toy.....

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