Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration

(Topic ID: 33446)

Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration


By vid1900

5 years ago



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#2351 2 years ago
Quoted from Steve-in-CT:

My question to you all is how do I proceed?

How far do you want to go?

Clean and wax?

Clearcoat?

#2352 2 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

How far do you want to go?
Clean and wax?

Yes, clean and wax. I know I can't make all the swirl marks disappear, but was hoping to minimize them as much as possible.

#2353 2 years ago
Quoted from Steve-in-CT:

Yes, clean and wax. I know I can't make all the swirl marks disappear, but was hoping to minimize them as much as possible.

Excellent to know your goals ahead of time.

I'd take some Naphtha and clean all the coil dust out of the playfield.

Then give it a good waxing with paste wax.

-

That playfield looks good enough to restore, so if you ever were going to clearcoat it, you would use alcohol and a Magic Eraser to remove the old topcoat and expose the virgin paint beneath.

#2354 2 years ago

Thanks for the advice and the thread. Lots of great information.

#2355 2 years ago

For some reason I didn't see this mentioned while searching this thread -

Once the field's clearcoated, cured, and reassembled - obviously it's not going to STAY spotless clean. What is recommended to clean the cured clearcoat (i.e. 'wax the playfield')?

#2356 2 years ago
Quoted from Coyote:

Once the field's clearcoated, cured, and reassembled - obviously it's not going to STAY spotless clean. What is recommended to clean the cured clearcoat (i.e. 'wax the playfield')?

Of course you waxed the playfield before reassembling it.

But now a month later, you see the dirt starting to form.

-

Start with the least invasive cleaning and move up from there:

Vacuum first - see how much crud goes away. Use brush attachment and crevasse attachment.

Wipe with soft dry cloth - is the remaining dirt glued on, or did it wipe away?

Wipe with soft cloth moistened with Novus1 or Simple Green - are you now down to clean playfield?

Vacuum again - take note of any scratches and ball trails.

Use Novus2 - with a soft cloth (not paper towel), polish out any scratches. Polish out the ball trails in the inlanes. Keep the cloth rotated to clean sections, and keep it moist with the Novus2.

Vacuum again - check your work. Ignore tiny scratches you won't see with the glass on.

Wax - Using the included applicator or a clean very slightly dampened with 1 drop of water cloth, rub the wax into the playfield using small circles. If your applicator is dirty from your car, don't even think of using it! Do the ramps, do the metal ball guides, the wire guides, undecaled target faces - every place the ball touches. Don't use too much wax! If using Blitz, use 1/4 of what you would use of Turtle Wax.

Wait 20 minutes - Drag you finger across, if it cleanly removes the wax film, it's ready. If it's slightly tacky, give it another 10 minutes.

Wipe - wipe off the wax film with soft cloth. If you are using good wax, there won't be any white wax chips or flakes at all. Keep the cloth turned to fresh areas.

Vacuum again if needed - if you used cheaper wax, you may need this final vacuum to pick up the wax dust.

Drop in new balls - for $5 a set, why not?

#2357 2 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Of course you waxed the playfield before reassembling it.

.. Oops.

Quoted from vid1900:

But now a month later, you see the dirt starting to form. [..]

Many, many thanks..!

#2358 2 years ago

Hi all,

So a question that certainly has been answered before, but here it goes...

I just redid my decal work last week and then yesterday (Saturday) did a new coat of clear. Once again I got little minute bubbles in it everywhere. Maybe when I look at it later they will be gone, but based on previous experience they won't be. I know I have to sand one more time because of some little pits I filled, but I would really like my next coat of clear to be my last.

If I get bubbles again, I am screwed. How do I clear without getting these? My compressor and gun setup is the exact spec of what Vid recommended in this forum. I am using the exact 2pac recommended as well. So why do I keep getting these tiny bubbles everywhere and what can be done to prevent them?

Thanks!

#2359 2 years ago
Quoted from MinnPin:

Hi all,
So a question that certainly has been answered before, but here it goes...
I just redid my decal work last week and then yesterday (Saturday) did a new coat of clear. Once again I got little minute bubbles in it everywhere. Maybe when I look at it later they will be gone, but based on previous experience they won't be. I know I have to sand one more time because of some little pits I filled, but I would really like my next coat of clear to be my last.
If I get bubbles again, I am screwed. How do I clear without getting these? My compressor and gun setup is the exact spec of what Vid recommended in this forum. I am using the exact 2pac recommended as well. So why do I keep getting these tiny bubbles everywhere and what can be done to prevent them?
Thanks!

Hi, I get bubbles if my first coats are to heavy. Did you do thin coats on the decals?

#2360 2 years ago
Quoted from MinnPin:

So why do I keep getting these tiny bubbles everywhere and what can be done to prevent them?

Are they craters or bubbles trapped inside the clear?

Do they instantly appear, or pop up a few minutes after clearing?

Is the playfield and the clear the exact same temp? Or are you bringing the playfield from the hot garage and the clear from the cool basement?

Are you stirring in tons of bubbles, or are you careful while mixing the 2PAC? You can let the 2PAC sit for 10 minutes while bubbles rise to the top.

Quoted from MinnPin:

If I get bubbles again, I am screwed.

You can drill out tiny bubbles with a CLEAN small drill bit and just drip some new clear into the void.

#2361 2 years ago

Hi Tezting and Vid,

Thanks for the quick replies.

Quoted from vid1900:

Are they craters or bubbles trapped inside the clear?
Do they instantly appear, or pop up a few minutes after clearing?

They are not craters, they are tiny, tiny bubbles trapped in the clear. I would say the bubbles appear instantly.

Quoted from vid1900:

Is the playfield and the clear the exact same temp? Or are you bringing the playfield from the hot garage and the clear from the cool basement?

My garage is under my house, attached to the basement. The clear was in the basement, but I brought it out to the garage a solid hour before i did anything with it.

Quoted from vid1900:

Are you stirring in tons of bubbles, or are you careful while mixing the 2PAC? You can let the 2PAC sit for 10 minutes while bubbles rise to the top.

I am mixing the portions of clear and hardener in one of those plastic automotive measuring/mixing quart containers, then pouring it into the reservoir on the gun and shaking it pretty well, which I understand creates bubbles. But I let it sit about 30 mins after shaking it up before spraying. I thought that would be long enough.

Don't know if that information sheds more light or not?

Thanks!

#2362 2 years ago
Quoted from MinnPin:

I am mixing the portions of clear and hardener in one of those plastic automotive measuring/mixing quart containers, then pouring it into the reservoir on the gun and shaking it pretty well, which I understand creates bubbles. But I let it sit about 30 mins after shaking it up before spraying. I thought that would be long enough.

Don't Shake it, you need to use a paint stick to stir it together. That will eliminate your bubbles.

#2363 2 years ago

Right, DON'T SHAKE IT.

Gently stir it. Don't make bubbles. Pour gently with the gun tipped sideways, so the clear runs down the inside of the cup - not making more bubbles.

#2364 2 years ago

Sounds like the answer I need. Gonna go to town on that right now, will report back with results. As always, thanks everyone!

#2365 2 years ago

OK, Vid, your expertise needed here...After convincing myself I'd done the best I could do with an ME, I cleaned the PF with some novus 2, leaving behind no residue that I could see. So, now it's almost time to paint. I was doing the final PF cleanup with some NAPTHA, and these appeared, seemingly out of nowhere:

white cloud.JPG

There are spots like this all over the PF. I swear on my mothers eyes that the only thing I've hit the PF with is ME + alcohol and Novus 2. Any thoughts on this greatly appreciated!!

#2366 2 years ago

By "spots" you mean the white residue?

#2367 2 years ago

Yes. They were not visible until the NAPTHA wipe down.

#2368 2 years ago

My fear in all of this is that the white spots represent some substance that was applied to the PF that will guarantee fisheyes in the clear.

I worked the area over again with NOVUS 2, wiped off the haze once the NOVUS dried, and the area looks quite a bit better after the NAPTHA wipedown. I'm thinking maybe I rushed it the first time around, and the NOVUS just needed more time to dry...Trying again and will report results, unless anyone has a better idea...

#2369 2 years ago

Naptha cleanup up of Novus 2 takes quite a bit of work. Do a first pass, change rags before doing a second pass. Getting it all off will take a bit of effort.

#2370 2 years ago

So...here's what I did: Stared at it for another 20-30 minutes. This doesn't look like anything I've seen before, and while I'm not new to pf restorations, this is the most extensive I've ever done, and I'm using vid's guide for the first time. And then I thought 'doesn't vid have a guide to cleaning that I've never read because I KNOW how to clean a pf?' So yeah, I read it, and yeah, I've been doing stuff wrong for years. There. I typed it.
I've been using poor/incorrect technique with the ME for a long, long time. Pretty sure that the clouds on the pf are melamine residue that has dried into the remaining clear. So I put some alcohol on an ME, rubbed it across the affected area - just 2-3 light strokes, enough to get the area damp - and let it sit for 30 seconds. Then 10 light strokes, and viola, no more clouds. Did the same with all of the cloudy areas and they all look great.
Painting next weekend...finally. And Vid, wow, just wow. I cannot thank you enough!!

#2371 2 years ago

so ive been messing with this playfield off and on for a while. im slowly getting there.

bmx.jpg

#2372 2 years ago

I have access to PPG Omni MC770 for free, any issues since I see everyone refer to MC161 and Shopline JC161?

#2373 2 years ago

Looks like the recoat time for MC770 is 8 hours, MC161 is 15 minutes.

For free, I could handle the wait.

#2374 2 years ago

Fantastic!

#2375 2 years ago

Looking good, Golden Oreos...on its way to stardom!

#2376 2 years ago

Attempting my first pinball restoration. Been going through the full 40 something pages of this post and wow, the wealth of information is simply overwhelming. Would not have atempted without it. Thanks for sharing all this Vid!

The machine is an old 70 Bally which saw some better times and was probably maintained on location just enough to keep it going. Spent a few weekends fixing the electromech and had it going 100% a few weeks ago. Then we played it and now finally decided to strip the playfield to tackle a restauration.
My intent is to fully clear coat the PF for good play purpose. Certainly not expecting a perfect restauration. But I'm picky so I'll put the effort to get it best as a novice can.

So here is where I stand and here are a few problem areas I'd like some advice on how to deal with.

The is the stripped playfield, partially cleaned top section. You can see the demarcation line between the pop bumpers above which I have done my first pass of cleaning. The paint in that area, apart for the worn and discolored spots, is in good shape.

IMG_20150913_215227.jpg

Next are a few areas where the paint is not in such good shape. I'd like to get some advice on how to deal with this. I haven't done any cleaning there yet other than lightly swipe with a dry paint brush to remove loose dirt. As you can see, this took off some flakes in some areas.

IMG_20150914_075427.jpg

IMG_20150914_075705.jpg

IMG_20150914_075552.jpg

IMG_20150914_075447.jpg

IMG_20150914_075438.jpg

I'm guessing the flaking paint needs to be removed completly. Just the cleaning with ME and alcohol will likely remove some. Them maybe a light sanding to feather the edges, then clearcoat and on with paint restauration?
Just not sure how hard to push the flaking paint removal or if I should do it at all. Should I be aggressive or should I just leave the flakes that don't come off with ME?

The big ugly blue mylars have to go. I was planing on freezing them but on the last few pages of the guide there is a quick comment by Vid about how its better to use heat on some older PFs. Would it be the case here?

For all the other worn spots it will be a long tedious frisket, paint and decal job I guess. Looking forward to that! Any advice welcome.

#2377 2 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Now I just said the word that scares the beginners - Air Brush.
Don't worry, you can get a perfectly serviceable brush for $12 at Harbor Freight.
You could try to thin out paint and manually brush it on, then try to sand it flat to remove the brush strokes, then touch it up again - but you are not going to do that. Your time and your playfield is more valuable than that.
You have spent $200 on LED lights for your game, you can certainly buy yourself an airbrush.
Now if you "get good" at this airbrush stuff, you can certainly buy a $200 Iwata brush, but I'm telling you that there is no playfield I could not restore with the HF one. I sometimes have 4 HF brushes filled with different colors at once, so I can keep my pace up. Spray, heat set, and on to the next color - that is how he pros do it.
You can use a regular shop air compressor (like a Pancake or 120 gallon garage monster), a dedicated "air brush" compressor, or even just canned airbrush air.
If you use a regular shop air compressor, put a simple water separator on the front of the air line to catch the moisture.
Don't ever drip oil into the hose you are going to use for painting. If you have already done this for your other air tools, buy a dedicated painting air hose.
http://www.harborfreight.com/deluxe-airbrush-kit-95810.html On sale all the time for $12.
image_11957.jpg

i am about to dive into the world of airbrush. I need to go get a water separator in a few minutes. i have a 165 gallon compressor from sears. how to i adapt down to the airbrush input and regulate the pressure. not sure what it's supposed to be. pardon my ignorance. great thread here btw. fantastic...

#2378 2 years ago
Quoted from rcbrown316:

i have a 165 gallon compressor from sears.

Well you shouldn't run out of air!

#2379 2 years ago
Quoted from rcbrown316:

i am about to dive into the world of airbrush. I need to go get a water separator in a few minutes. i have a 165 gallon compressor from sears. how to i adapt down to the airbrush input and regulate the pressure. not sure what it's supposed to be. pardon my ignorance. great thread here btw. fantastic...

Put one of these on the input to your gun:

http://www.harborfreight.com/150-psi-air-compressor-regulator-kit-with-dial-gauge-68223.html

That way you can adjust without going back to the compressor AND you can leave the compressor at 100psi for all your other tools.

image_13985.jpg

#2380 2 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Put one of these on the input to your gun:
http://www.harborfreight.com/150-psi-air-compressor-regulator-kit-with-dial-gauge-68223.html
That way you can adjust without going back to the compressor AND you can leave the compressor at 100psi for all your other tools.

image_13985.jpg

awesome thanks vid!!!

#2381 2 years ago
Quoted from Fred736:

The big ugly blue mylars have to go. I was planing on freezing them but on the last few pages of the guide there is a quick comment by Vid about how its better to use heat on some older PFs. Would it be the case here?

I don't think that is Mylar, it looks like blue vinyl "shelf paper". Try heat on that stuff first.

Quoted from Fred736:

For all the other worn spots it will be a long tedious frisket, paint and decal job I guess. Looking forward to that! Any advice welcome.

Here is what a pro would do:

1. Scan the entire playfield with a HP4600 scanner - so you have the art saved from the following destruction.

2. Sand out the shooter lane (paint if necessary), sand out the ball trail that leads up to the top arch (don't try to spot sand, sand all the wood to the edge of the graphics, sand the bare wood by the flippers up to the graphics, sand the two kick out saucers (wood filler and paint if necessary), sand in front of slingshots. Use some shellac to "stain" the wood back to a realistic color for it's age.

3. Clean the playfield with a Magic Eraser and 96% Iso Alcohol. Get rid of any loose paint that would blow off when you spray a coat of clear.

4. Fill in any cupped inserts or worn divots with 2PAC using an eyedropper.

5. Spray a thin coat of 2PAC over the entire playfield, now the existing paint is locked down and safe to frisket.

6. Sand the clear with 400 grit and now start masking all the colors. Do all the Blue first, then Red, then.....you get the ideas, darker colors first.

7. Seal all the paint under a thin layer of clear.

8. Apply water slide decals to replace all the lettering.

9. Clear over decals. Sand clear dead flat, and apply final layer of clear.

10. Buff to mirror shine.

11. Enjoy the nicest See Saw known to man.

#2382 2 years ago

Well I guess somebody had to make that call. Basically stop dicking around trying to make spot repairs, bite the bullet, ME over the whole PF. Don't hold back, whatever goes goes. Sand unpainted wood, then go for major repaint followed with good decal job. With the required clear coats in between.
Can live with that.
Will keep you posted with my progress as I go if there is interest. Not sure this thread is the best place to post this kind of info though. Will look around to see if there is a better place. Maybe a new thread.
Vid, thanks for the making the call on this one. Guess this novice restorer just needed that nudge in that direction.
As for your Playfield Restauration Guide well, it's awesome. 'Nuf said. Off to work.

#2383 2 years ago
Quoted from Fred736:

Will keep you posted with my progress as I go if there is interest. Not sure this thread is the best place to post this kind of info though

You can put it here, pinheads love that stuff!

#2384 2 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

I don't think that is Mylar, it looks like blue vinyl "shelf paper". Try heat on that stuff first.

Here is what a pro would do:
1. Scan the entire playfield with a HP4600 scanner - so you have the art saved from the following destruction.
2. Sand out the shooter lane (paint if necessary), sand out the ball trail that leads up to the top arch (don't try to spot sand, sand all the wood to the edge of the graphics, sand the bare wood by the flippers up to the graphics, sand the two kick out saucers (wood filler and paint if necessary), sand in front of slingshots. Use some shellac to "stain" the wood back to a realistic color for it's age.
3. Clean the playfield with a Magic Eraser and 96% Iso Alcohol. Get rid of any loose paint that would blow off when you spray a coat of clear.
4. Fill in any cupped inserts or worn divots with 2PAC using an eyedropper.
5. Spray a thin coat of 2PAC over the entire playfield, now the existing paint is locked down and safe to frisket.
6. Sand the clear with 400 grit and now start masking all the colors. Do all the Blue first, then Red, then.....you get the ideas, darker colors first.
7. Seal all the paint under a thin layer of clear.
8. Apply water slide decals to replace all the lettering.
9. Clear over decals. Sand clear dead flat, and apply final layer of clear.
10. Buff to mirror shine.
11. Enjoy the nicest See Saw known to man.

Vid, I have read this entire guide, as well as your other guides, as well as tons of other stuff, and I have to say, if someone asked me to please explain how to do it all in a few words, your list of 10 steps says it all.

The one issue for me is this: 4 clear coats. I don't have the space or the inclination to set myself up with a safe booth and all of safety equipment as well as all of the spray equipment. So that means I need to get it done another way. I talked to an auto repair guy who has done work on my cars several times and always was fair in my opinion, and he while he was scratching his head trying to understand the point of it, he said he would do it for $150. From what I have read, that is about the going rate. That means 4 x 150 =$600 to spend to get the 4 coats of clear down.

This would be OK for a higher-priced, popular machine, or for a machine that I really liked and wanted to keep forever, or at least for a long time. But for this Monte Carlo I have been working on, I don't think it makes sense. I don't have too much in it as far as money, I got it for a good price as a project machine, and that was fine. I have had to do a fair amount of work to get it all working, and haven't had to spend too much for parts. But in the end, this isn't a very popular machine. Even if I managed to make it look really good, I don't think it would be worth more than $600-700. Maybe a little more. I'm not in it to make money, and I don't mind the hours I put in on it because that is for fun, but I don't want to spend a bunch more than its worth, because I'm not convinced its a keeper.

So after getting the playfield parts organized and in somewhat decent shape, and then giving it a once-over cleaning finalized with naphtha, it doesn't really look too bad, much nicer than when I got it.

playfield_1_sm.jpg

But it definitely has some issues.

Planking I believe:

playfield_middle_1_sm.jpg

The area around the pop bumpers is torn up the worst.

playfield_bumpers_1_sm.jpg

The middle outhole is chewed up pretty bad.

outhole_middle_1.jpg

I am debating if I should just wax the whole thing up, get it playing, and enjoy it for a while. Then if I decide to sell it, the buyer can decide if they want to re-do the playfield. I wouldn't lose a bunch of money.

If I want to take it on as a project to fix it up nice, I will need to spend $600 for clear coats, plus the paints and other stuff. I will have a lot more into to it than it is worth.

Is there any middle ground? Should I at least try to repair the chewed up outhole? Any other suggestions?

#2385 2 years ago
Quoted from xsvtoys:

The one issue for me is this: 4 clear coats. I don't have the space or the inclination to set myself up with a safe booth and all of safety equipment as well as all of the spray equipment. So that means I need to get it done another way. I talked to an auto repair guy who has done work on my cars several times and always was fair in my opinion, and he while he was scratching his head trying to understand the point of it, he said he would do it for $150. From what I have read, that is about the going rate. That means 4 x 150 =$600 to spend to get the 4 coats of clear down.

If you can borrow your father in law's air compressor, the rest of the stuff including safety equipment is ~$100.

Quoted from xsvtoys:

If I want to take it on as a project to fix it up nice, I will need to spend $600 for clear coats, plus the paints and other stuff. I will have a lot more into to it than it is worth.

Honestly, there are only a dozen machines that are "worth" a restore money-wise when you factor in all your labor. Everything else is a labor of love.

Quoted from xsvtoys:

Is there any middle ground? Should I at least try to repair the chewed up outhole? Any other suggestions?

If the chewed up outhole is not stopping the game from playing normally (like it does in MM), then just wax and play it.

#2386 2 years ago
Quoted from xsvtoys:

Vid, I have read this entire guide, as well as your other guides, as well as tons of other stuff, and I have to say, if someone asked me to please explain how to do it all in a few words, your list of 10 steps says it all.
The one issue for me is this: 4 clear coats. I don't have the space or the inclination to set myself up with a safe booth and all of safety equipment as well as all of the spray equipment. So that means I need to get it done another way. I talked to an auto repair guy who has done work on my cars several times and always was fair in my opinion, and he while he was scratching his head trying to understand the point of it, he said he would do it for $150. From what I have read, that is about the going rate. That means 4 x 150 =$600 to spend to get the 4 coats of clear down.
This would be OK for a higher-priced, popular machine, or for a machine that I really liked and wanted to keep forever, or at least for a long time. But for this Monte Carlo I have been working on, I don't think it makes sense. I don't have too much in it as far as money, I got it for a good price as a project machine, and that was fine. I have had to do a fair amount of work to get it all working, and haven't had to spend too much for parts. But in the end, this isn't a very popular machine. Even if I managed to make it look really good, I don't think it would be worth more than $600-700. Maybe a little more. I'm not in it to make money, and I don't mind the hours I put in on it because that is for fun, but I don't want to spend a bunch more than its worth, because I'm not convinced its a keeper.
So after getting the playfield parts organized and in somewhat decent shape, and then giving it a once-over cleaning finalized with naphtha, it doesn't really look too bad, much nicer than when I got it.
playfield_1_sm.jpg
But it definitely has some issues.
Planking I believe:
playfield_middle_1_sm.jpg
The area around the pop bumpers is torn up the worst.
playfield_bumpers_1_sm.jpg
The middle outhole is chewed up pretty bad.
outhole_middle_1.jpg
I am debating if I should just wax the whole thing up, get it playing, and enjoy it for a while. Then if I decide to sell it, the buyer can decide if they want to re-do the playfield. I wouldn't lose a bunch of money.
If I want to take it on as a project to fix it up nice, I will need to spend $600 for clear coats, plus the paints and other stuff. I will have a lot more into to it than it is worth.
Is there any middle ground? Should I at least try to repair the chewed up outhole? Any other suggestions?

i have been doing a few clearcoats and while i would NEVER question vid i have been getting away with laying down one, letting it tack up then laying down a second and letting it cure. wet sanding then laying down two more and wet sanding and buffing. you should be able to get all this done for 150 in my opinion. i am not suggesting i do it but i have had quotes from others for 125 complete

#2387 2 years ago

Hi Vid,
A small question, what is the maximum grid of sandpaper I can use when using frisket? I ask because I want to sand it flat before doing my touch ups. But I want the frisket to seal so the lines I cut will be clean so paint dont run "under" the frisket because the scratches from the sandpaper is to deep.
I hope it alle makes sense

#2388 2 years ago

Most brands of Frisket needs 400grit or finer to grip tight.

#2389 2 years ago

Any thoughts on how to deal with this - the nail or whatever at the 1 o'clock position on the pop bumper ring? IMG_4307.JPGWhatever it was, it's not high enough to get a grip on with some needle nose pliers and pull it out. I don't plan to restore this area around the pop bumpers. My plan is to paint some mylar disks rather than try to match this much yellow. In the meantime, I'm still trying to figure out why this is there, unless there was some problem with balls getting trapped...? The only thing I've thought of so far to get rid of it is to try and grind it down with a Drimel, or drive it flush with a punch. Any thoughts much appreciated.

#2390 2 years ago
Quoted from bobnatlanta:

Whatever it was, it's not high enough to get a grip on with some needle nose pliers and pull it out.

You will need Flush Cut pliers to grip it (or you can drill the head off):

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/removing-side-rails-vids-guide

Quoted from bobnatlanta:

My plan is to paint some mylar disks rather than try to match this much yellow.

Paint does not stick to Mylar.

To match that Gottlieb yellow, it's usually 4 drops Createx yellow + 1 drop of Createx white - adjust to mach the amount of fade on your game.

Quoted from bobnatlanta:

In the meantime, I'm still trying to figure out why this is there, unless there was some problem with balls getting trapped...?

It looks like a a ball trap fix. You see the same thing often on early Space Shuttles, upper right of the pop bumper.

#2391 2 years ago

On the topic of side rails. Once your PF is all cleared, and you need to reinstall the side rails which are Brad nailed from below how do you proceed without damaging the clear at the point were the nail will come through it?

#2392 2 years ago

Hi Vid,
Thanks for posting these instructions, this a super informative and much appreciated by many pinsiders. I am fixing up a friends WCS and the previous owner came through the playfield with a screw , I would like to attempt to fix it for him but am not completely sure how to approach it. Can u please take a look at the picture and tell me what u would do to fix this? Thanks.

image.jpg

image_1.jpg

#2393 2 years ago
Quoted from RampShot11:

Hi Vid,
Thanks for posting these instructions, this a super informative and much appreciated by many pinsiders. I am fixing up a friends WCS and the previous owner came through the playfield with a screw , I would like to attempt to fix it for him but am not completely sure how to approach it. Can u please take a look at the picture and tell me what u would do to fix this? Thanks.

image.jpg image_1.jpg

If you need a high-res scan of that area to reproduce the dithering, let me know, I got ya covered.

#2394 2 years ago
Quoted from Coyote:

If you need a high-res scan of that area to reproduce the dithering, let me know, I got ya covered.

Thanks for the offer. I just might take you up on that.

#2395 2 years ago

Here's what it looked like before I remo the previous work. It definitely affected the ball travel.

image.jpg

#2396 2 years ago

My first airbrushing...
This is a closeup beforeyellow before.JPG

Here's the area masked offyellow masked.JPG

And here's afteryellow after.JPG

Yes, the yellow does not quite match. The new color is a hair's breadth from the orginal yellow, and I am going to do the other yellow areas to get a better match. The black lines still need to be cleaned up, but I am amazed at the coverage here. You can enlarge these pics and see the flaws that remain, but from three feet away...nada. I am pleased with the first pass, but I will probably stare at it for a couple more hours before I heat set it and move on, or wipe it up and do it all over again. Looking at the pics, there are still a couple areas that might need a second coat, but that should be pretty easy. Total time to do this, less than an hour, most of the time spent cutting the frisket. It's pretty easy, but there are not many straight lines in the section.

Thanks again for all the tips, Vid!!

#2397 2 years ago

Is there a particular brand of tack cloth we should use when cleaning the play field of dust prior to using a water based product (such as paint or clear). I ask because if the tack cloth is oil based, would it impact the ability for the water based product to lay on the playfield properly?

#2398 2 years ago

Just a few Quick questions. I have a Jungle Lord Playfield that I am working on. I have attached some close up pics. I used ME and 91% Alcohol to clean the playfield. There are still ball swirl marks but before I go further I did a repeated wipe down with Naphtha.

The pics are where I am at currently. This one will have a good bit of airbrush touch up that will be needed. Some of the details are very intricate and I am not sure how I will get them done.
IMG_0456[1].JPG
IMG_0454[1].JPG
IMG_0453[1].JPG

My questions are from these pictures am I ready to have my Auto Clear Coat buddy lay down the 1st dust coat and 2nd light coat of Auto Clear? How do you know when you are ready? I know that I need to secure the backside, place masking tape over the back of the switch holes and other places where clear will be sprayed, and remove the drop targets. But at what general point do you say I am ready to go to clear?

I have a couple of inserts that move slightly when pushed and are lifting, so I will glue them with the 2 part epoxy (exactly as detailed in Vids guide). Should I glue all of them down to prevent future lifting?

What does everyone do with light sockets, can I just use a bulb during clear coating?

There are still swill marks, so I hit these with ME and alcohol until better/gone?

IMG_0455[1].JPG
I have three small holes (not sure why) just below the bottom insert between the flippers. From the bottom of the circle insert to the hole seems to be some wood split, should that be carved out and filed, or sanded and filled or what? Is there a guide on filling holes and repairing playfield damage in Vid's guides (TY!)

Anyway this is my 1st pinball, my 1st restoration (maybe I am crazy for going all in on my 1st).

Thank you for all the help from everyone and thank you Vid for your amazing repair guides!

#2399 2 years ago

Was on the prowl this past week searching for some 2PAC.

Turns out PPG’s Omni MC161 (aka Shopline JC660), which is Vid's recommendation of choice for novices clearcoaters, is no longer available in Canada since 2010 because of its VOC levels.

Vendor’s suggestion for a similarly priced and packaged product from the same family is PPG’s Omni MC262.

Spec sheet for both those products availble here under 'clearcoat'
http://ca.ppgrefinish.com/PPG-Refinish/Products/Automotive-Refinish/Omni

Putting both above spec sheets side-by-side I do see some minor differences. However, I’m not sure how those would affect application.

Vendor also offered PPG’s Envirobase EC800 as a product offered in quart packaging.
But it's an entirely different family of product and is quite pricy at about 3 to 4x the cost of the two above.

http://www.nedsautobodysupply.com/PPG_EC800_EB-800_Ultra_Fast_2.1_Clearcoat_12-2011_.pdf

Has anyone had experience with any of those alternative products.
All you Canadian restorers, what clear have you been using that you feel works for a novice clearcoater?

#2400 2 years ago

Vid, what's your decision process between using mylar POP rings OR a full sheet with holes cut and edges cut to match the playfield layout.

I have a few new CPR playfields now that I want to do "best practices with" to last 50+ years...

thanks,
mof

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