Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration

(Topic ID: 33446)

Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration


By vid1900

5 years ago



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#951 4 years ago
Quoted from Lonzo:

When you fill with an eye dropper do you mean fill and let dry and sand before the next coat or do you mean fill to add clear and then spray the rest of the playfield immediately?

You can fill it and then shoot a layer of clear immediately, but you need to shoot the clear STRAIGHT DOWN over the fill.

If you shoot at any type of an angle, the air pressure will often push the fill out of the hole and leave a "wave" on the playfield. If this happens, sand the wave out with 220 grit (800 would take forever), and fix the depression again latter.

Or just wait for the fill to dry a hour or so, and shoot normally.

If you let the fill dry a few days before you clear, de-gloss it with some sandpaper as the fill is now fully cured, and in need of some tooth to bond with the new layer.

#952 4 years ago

Here this playfield is being sanded dead flat.

Note that some of the post depressions are still glossy.

Whether you were going to fill them in, or ignore them because you won't see the depression under the posts, you still have to de-gloss the depressions so that the next coat of clear will have some tooth.

If you don't, the next layer of clear may not adhere well enough and could crack when you tighten the posts.

Some Emery Cloth, or old worn soft sandpaper is great for hand sanding depressions.

DEPRESSION.jpg

#953 4 years ago

I have also had an issue with clearing over Createx paint. Sometimes is appears to gas a lot over the paint. Looks like little micro bubbles or something. Only happens over the paint and is most prevalent over black. It is usually not an issue as it is normally not my last clear so I sand and it is fine with the next clear application.

Any thoughts?

#954 4 years ago
Quoted from Lonzo:

I have also had an issue with clearing over Createx paint. Sometimes is appears to gas a lot over the paint. Looks like little micro bubbles or something. Only happens over the paint and is most prevalent over black. It is usually not an issue as it is normally not my last clear so I sand and it is fine with the next clear application.

I've seen those micro bubbles rising from the first clearcoat over decals where it is printed black sometimes.

Just like you, I sand them flat and they don't reappear again, so the clearcoat must seal them from further chemical interaction.

I have not seen it with Createx paints, but I'd guess the phenomena is related because of the black pigment.

#955 4 years ago

How much activated clear should I the load the HF HVLP gun with to shoot the pre-touchup light coat on a standard sized playfield? Using Shopline JC660 and the Medium hardener.

How much more would a person load for 1 standard coat?

#956 4 years ago

The more experience you have, the farther you can make a batch of clear go.

Beginners will lose more material to overspray or having to go back and spray down more clear in a thin spot.

Have some things that also need clear sitting around to use up any left over clear.

Freshly painted rails, aprons, and that kind of thing can remove any guilt of having to toss out left over, expensive clear.

=-

For a beginner, I'd say mix up 1/4 cup will be plenty.

As you gain experience, you can dial that down .

#957 4 years ago

You talk a out sanding inserts with 1000 grit before installing insert decals. When you sand an insert it clouds up and then looks perfect when shot with clear. How does this work when the insert is covered with a clear decal with text? The clouded I sent is covered before clear so how does it look? Does the moist application take care of that cloudy look? Also will it make a difference if it is a water slide or adhesive vinyl insert decal?

Also when you clear, do you just spray one mist coat and then one regular coat? I have seen a mist coat and then 2 regular coats with allowing to dry to tacky touch (20 min or so) between coats. Is one way better than the other?

#958 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Whether you were going to fill them in, or ignore them

is your preference to fill or ignore Vid?

-thanks I will take my answer off the air-

#959 4 years ago
Quoted from Lonzo:

When you sand an insert it clouds up and then looks perfect when shot with clear. How does this work when the insert is covered with a clear decal with text?

When you mist it, the decal looks slightly milky, then when you hit it with a regular layer of clear, the decal reacts and becomes invisible, with only the ink showing. The edge and field of the decal is undetectable.

Quoted from Lonzo:

Also will it make a difference if it is a water slide or adhesive vinyl insert decal?

I only use the waterslide, the vinyl seems too thick and would require more work to bury in the clearcoat. Vinyl also seems to shrink over the years, so I don't use it.

Quoted from Lonzo:

Also when you clear, do you just spray one mist coat and then one regular coat? I have seen a mist coat and then 2 regular coats with allowing to dry to tacky touch (20 min or so) between coats. Is one way better than the other?

Sanding between regular coats is the only way to flatten the playfield.

But if you have other work (like maybe a fisheye opens up), you could shoot a little more clear.

Remember, you don't want too much clear on a playfield. The flippers will rub and switches would have to be rebent.

#960 4 years ago
Quoted from Whysnow:

is your preference to fill or ignore Vid?

Depends on the client.

For my own games, I'll often ignore anything under the plastics.

I'd rather spend my time on the places that matter to gameplay.

#961 4 years ago

I understand the "you don't want too much clear on the playfield" idea. I may actually shoot a play field 3 or 4 times before I am done depending on how bad it is, but a lot of the clear is sanded off between shoots. Kinda like HEP does. (although I have about a 1/10 of the skill of those guys ). I do minor touchup and shoot the playfiled to seal it up. Then I do as much artwork as I can and then shoot again. Then I might do decals and other artwork and shoot again. May not be the best way to do it but I am learning.

I also do not lose sleep over things that will be covered up.

And just to clarify my question about the inserts. The sanded area is underneath the decal but it still turns clear after you shoot it?

#962 4 years ago

It looks like the decal melts or becomes saturated with the clear.

I've even stacked 2 decals on top of each other if the print is too translucent.

decals.jpg

#963 4 years ago

The two decal thing is a good idea. I have had that problem before but have have not tried that. Do you do it at the same time or clear between decals?

#964 4 years ago
Quoted from Lonzo:

Do you do it at the same time or clear between decals?

I just stack them directly on top of each other. Let one dry and then add another.

Usually it's only the odd color printing. Black is normally plenty dark.

#965 4 years ago

WORKING EFFICIENTLY WHILE CLEARCOATING.

=====================================================================

We don't want to take everything off the back of the playfield if we don't have to.

Some old playfields have no clearcoat or grey paint on the back to seal them, so sometimes you have no choice - but normally, don't put yourself through more work than you need to. A playfield that is coated on both sides has much less chance of ever warping. It puts a more equal tension on both sided of the wood, and it slows the entrance and exit of moisture.

If you are shipping a playfield, then you probably want to strip both sides either way.

If all the light sockets are corroded and in need of replacement, it is usually faster to strip the back of the playfield than to perform surgical replacement.

Note that there is, of course, some risk of not reassembling everything correctly, or even damaging something; in stripping the back of the playfield.

Before you start, take 50 pictures from all different angles and directions of the back of the playfield, so you can put everything back in it's proper place and orientation. If you think you took enough, take 20 more.

coverage.jpg
#966 4 years ago

We need to protect all the electrical connectors from dirt, dust and overspray.

There will be plenty of dust while sanding.

Use heavy duty bags and a zipties to secure them.

Use "freezer" bags, because they are a thicker mil of plastic.

Coil up the wiring harnesses and secure them to the bottom of the playfield .

ZIP-3.jpg

#967 4 years ago

Getting everything off the top of the playfield is easy, but some mechs below we REALLY don't want to get gummed up with overspray.

Pull drop target mechs away from their playfield slots and secure with zipties.

Ziptie mechs to thick parts of the wiring harness, or other very secure parts of the playfield.

Cover the slots with blue painter's tape.

Clearcoat generally wont go down small slots and holes, but large holes are just asking for trouble if you don't seal them up.

Gottliebs are notorious for having all Standard screw heads that are terrible for re-assembly and disassemblely (both on the top and bottom of the playfield). I usually throw them all in a bag for the owner if he wants "all original" hardware, and re-assemble with Phillips head screws. Phillips install about 20x faster, and way less chance of the screwgun slipping out of the head and damaging the playfield.
ZIP-TIE.jpg

#968 4 years ago

Look for secure locations for the zipties.

Don't leave anything dangling, or you will get cracked solder joints (if the wire does not break entirely).

Don't secure any mechs near the top or bottom edge of the playfield because you need that area clear for the rotisserie.

Sometimes the wiring harness or brackets are secured from the factory too close to the top or bottom edge. Remove these and save yourself a lot of headaches latter.

ZIP-2.jpg

#969 4 years ago

I have two areas on my Bally Playboy I need some suggestions on repairing.
The 4 inserts along the top are cuped causing the ball to atually sit on them if its rolling slow enough, sanding them flat is not an option... I don't want to loose the image.
The other area is the painted area above the flippers, the actual repainting is not so much the problem as repainting the text, how would I do that, I don't want to have to reseal the playfield. I saw someone selling a PF stencil set on ebay but would be afraid of not lining it up properly and how well it would stick after countless times of the ball rolling over it.

PB-Insertss-735.JPG
#970 4 years ago

#971 4 years ago
Quoted from REMPins:

The 4 inserts along the top are cuped causing the ball to atually sit on them if its rolling slow enough, sanding them flat is not an option... I don't want to loose the image.

You never want to sand down cupped inserts, they are already too thin - that's why they cupped in the first place.

Gently de-gloss them to give the clear some "tooth" and then fill them with 2PAC.

Once they dry, sand them flat and your new reinforced inserts will be ready for action.

Detailed directions about 2/3rds down:

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration/page/17

#972 4 years ago

I copy/paste all your posts into a Word document so I can find stuff easier. This is the table of contents from it. The number in parentheses is the page number in the thread.

REMOVING MYLAR (p1)
DAMAGE ASSESSMENT (p1)
REMOVING INSERTS (p1)
INSTALLING INSERTS (p1)
FIXING INSERT GHOSTING (p2)
PAINTING FOR PLAYFIELD RESTORATION (p2)
AIRBRUSH DISCUSSION (p2)
FRISKET, MASKING, AND SPRAYING COLOR (p2)
FIXING LINE ART, TEXT, SCANNING FOR WATER SLIDE DECALS (p3)
FILLING GOUGES AND CHIPS (p3)
PAINTING WHITE AREAS (p3)
RAISING INSERTS (p3)
THE SHOOTER LANE (p3)
PAINTING VERY FINE LINES (p4)
PLANKING REPAIR EXAMPLE (p5)
AIR COMPRESSOR DISCUSSION (p5)
APPLYING INSERT DECALS (p6)
CLEARCOATING PLAYFIELDS (p16)
THE PROPER CHOICE FOR CLEAR COATING (p16)
STUFF YOU ARE GOING TO NEED TO CLEAR A PLAYFIELD (p16)
MORE SAFETY EQUIPMENT YOU NEED (p16)
MORE STUFF YOU ARE GOING TO NEED TO CLEAR A PLAYFIELD (p17)
CUPPED INSERT REPAIR (p17)
SHOOTER LANE REPAINTING (p18)
OUTGASSING AND INSERT BLOOMING (p18)
STAR ROLLOVERS (p19)
MAGIC ERASER (p19)
FLATTENING THE PLAYFIELD BETWEEN CLEAR COATS (p19)
WORKING EFFICIENTLY WHILE CLEARCOATING (p20)

#973 4 years ago

This thread just keeps getting better. Great information Vid. Soaking it in. Practicing it is another thing though.

#974 4 years ago

Got my 1st coat of clear down and it looks pretty good for my first time even using a spray gun. Feeling confident that when its all said it done it will look great.

Thanks for the awesome guide Vid.

Question:

The HF airbrush says MAX of 30 psi. The Createx airbrush color webpage says 40-50 psi or higher and has a video of a guy saying 75 psi works best for the airbrush opaques.

What is a good psi setting for the HF brush for what this guide outlines for color?

#975 4 years ago
Quoted from KloggMonkey:

What is a good psi setting for the HF brush for what this guide outlines for color?

For this brush, I think I run 50psi :

image_22320.jpg

And this one 40 :

image_13800.jpg

But it's Harbor Freight, so the "quality" can change without notice.

Experiment and you will quickly get a feel for good flow.

I use a separate regulator for each type of gun, once I set it, I rarely need to ever adjust it again.

Don't leave them plugged in overnight at high pressure or the o-ring might blow, lol.

#976 4 years ago
Quoted from radium:

I copy/paste all your posts into a Word document so I can find stuff easier. This is the table of contents from it.

Radium, I'm stealing your idea here... I just added in a Table of Contents to the front of the PDF versions of Vid's Guides...

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guides-pdf-version

And you're right... its soooooo much easier to read through with a ToC.

#977 4 years ago

SANDING AND PREPPING FOR CLEARCOAT

==========================================

We need to sand the playfield to give some tooth for the clearcoat to stick to.

You mostly want some fine sandpaper for this job, maybe 800-1000 grit.

If you are clearing a reproduction playfield, or a new Stern playfield that has a clear coated surface, you can probably use 400-600 grit and REALLY give your clear some tooth.

On older non-clearcoated playfields, think of this job as de-glossing, rather than any actual sanding.

Don't press to hard, you don't want to sand off any paint.

Don't sand flaky paint that has turned to chalk. If it is chalky and dull, it will hopefully adhere to the clear due to it's lack of gloss. Many sys11 Williams games are just too fragile to sand.

You will probably have to hand sand with just sandpaper folded to get into cupped inserts and into holes and slots. Look at a reflected light source at an angle to see any glossy spots you missed.

Make sure you clean out the Shooter Lane and check how it will look with a rag soaked in Naphtha. You don't want to seal a bunch of dirt or grey wood under the clearcoat.

CUPPED INSERTS - I would sand these and fill them with clear from an eyedropper. You will see later why it is good to do this step before you clearcoat.

HOLES - Try and sand inside of slots and holes with emery sticks or coarse sandpaper (120-220 grit). You need the clear to REALLY hang on to these difficult edges. If anyone ever used Pledge or some other silicone based crap on the playfield, you will soon find out.

Blow out any holes on both the front and back of the playfield with your air compressor (do this outside, the playfield dust is toxic).

Wipe the whole playfield down with Naphtha, then follow with a Tack Cloth. Do not touch the playfield with your oily fingers or stir up any dust - you are ready to spray the clear.

CROSSECTION.jpg

#978 4 years ago

So you have shot your first coat of clear.

It will appear glossier than anything you have ever seen (this gloss will fade a little in a few days as the clear shrinks into the cracks and crevices of the playfield).

You will notice that the clear did not "fill in" cupped inserts, dents or worn valleys, it simply followed the curve.

You will notice that instead of burying humps or decals in the clear, the clear simply built the humps even higher.

Finally, you will notice that the clear walled up around holes and slots. It did not "run" down the holes, dripping from the backside. It actually makes a wall around holes, taller than the surrounding clearcoat.

FIRST-COAT-OF-CLEAR.jpg

#979 4 years ago

Every beginner thinks that the more layers of clear they lay down, the flatter the playfield will become.

But they quickly discover that each new layer of clear follows all the old dips and humps, making the new layer just as lumpy as the last (and around holes, sometimes even more humpy).

This means that you have to sand between each coat if you want a totally flat playfield.

Read the above sentence again.

For about 24 hours, the new layer clear will stick to the last layer because the last layer, although hard, is not fully cured. After 24 hours, plan on always sanding to give tooth to the new layer.

If you don't sand, and simply put a new layer of clear on a fully cured layer, the 2 layers may separate latter down the line. If this happens, you have to sand back to the old layer. You don't want to ever have to do that.

SECOND-COAT-OF-CLEAR.jpg

#980 4 years ago

The next thing beginners do is fold up some sandpaper and hand sand the last layer of clear.

Hand sanding will follow all the curves in the playfield and not make the playfield flat.

The sandpaper will "fall" into holes and slots, making them crater and angle inward.

HAND-SANDING.jpg

#981 4 years ago

To make the playfield flat, we need to sand using a flat surface.

The larger the surface of the pad, the flatter the sanding result.

Once you get a bunch of playfields under your belt, you can use a pneumatic or electric sander, but for a beginner, you want a sanding pad made for drywall.

The fresh clearcoat dust will want to quickly clog your sandpaper, so have your air nozzle ready to blow out the dust from the pad.

You don't want to use any fine grit sandpaper for this knock down of the playfield surface. 400-500 grit will give you quick knockdown of hills, and less clogging on the pad.

The clearcoat dust is toxic, use a respirator mask, and don't track the dust through your house. Take your Tyvek suit off outside and shake it outside.

Note in this diagram how the playfield is flat, but the cupped insert still has a low center. Hand sand the dip, and fill with a few drops of clearcoat before you spray the next layer.

PAD-SANDING.jpg

hand sander.jpg

#982 4 years ago

Salut,

I'm following this thread (as the others from Vid) with great admiration for the knowledge and the time Vid is spending to share his experience and to help others. Simply great.

While I was reading all this, I thought that I should start a new project with some more work on the playfield than the projects I had before.

I have just got my Future Spa Playfield and my biggest concern are the inserts.
They are nearly all cupped and what worries me more is that the decals are starting to get loose.
I have studied the section about cupped inserts, but I'm not sure, if I could simply fill them with clear as described.

Here some pictures (sorry, but I have not cleaned the playfield until now).

Insert-01.jpg
Insert-02.jpg

If possible I would like to avoid producing new decals (I do not have a scanner available and my knowledge about Photoshop is practically zero).

Apart from this the playfield is not too bad. As far as I can see for now, there is only wear around lane switches and one bumper (although this could change once mylar removed and cleaned).

Playfield.jpg

Thanks in advance,
Cheers,
flugs

#983 4 years ago
Quoted from flugs:

I have just got my Future Spa Playfield and my biggest concern are the inserts.
They are nearly all cupped and what worries me more is that the decals are starting to get loose.

Those are not decals, that is the ink from the silkscreened playfield starting to lift away from the substrate.

Ink has an easier time sticking to porous wood, than to the slick plastic of an insert.

The Mylar, that has protected your playfield from wear all these years, would have to be removed before restoration could start.

That same Mylar may not come off the playfield without peeling a bunch of ink with it.

The best advice may be to leave the playfield alone, but if you have the stomach for it:

Find some Mylar as far away from the player's POV as possible and warm it with a hair dryer, or freeze it with canned air - and see if it will lift cleanly. If not, trim off the lifted edge of the Mylar, replace it with a new scrap of Mylar and just enjoy the game as is.

#984 4 years ago

Thanks for the answer Vid.

I can clearly feel a "plastic" type something on top of the insert and when I press on it, I can here a noise as if it is glued (this is at places where there is no mylar). Is this "plastic" the layer from the silkscreen (maybe this is a dump question, but I do not know much about this)).

I will try to get the mylar off. There are a lot of places where it already starts to lift at the border, so I will have to do something.
If I will be lucky and able to remove the mylar, could I clearcoat the playfield or should I place new mylar?
Would you advise to push the inserts a bit higher prior applying clear coat or new mylar?

Thanks again for your patience,
Cheers,
flugs

#985 4 years ago
Quoted from flugs:

I can clearly feel a "plastic" type something on top of the insert and when I press on it, I can here a noise as if it is glued (this is at places where there is no mylar). Is this "plastic" the layer from the silkscreen (maybe this is a dump question, but I do not know much about this)).

Let's see a close up picture or two.

The ancient silkscreen overcoat would not have any tackiness 30 years latter, so I'm not sure about the sound.

Quoted from flugs:

If I will be lucky and able to remove the mylar, could I clearcoat the playfield or should I place new mylar?

Clearcoat would be the best, but new Mylar is easier/cheaper.

Quoted from flugs:

Would you advise to push the inserts a bit higher prior applying clear coat or new mylar?

You will want to push the inserts down, so they are flush with the surface of the playfield. Then glue them in place to keep them from popping up again.

You can fill all the cupped inserts with 2PAC to make them flat again, once they are glued in place.

#986 4 years ago

Salut,

When I said push the insert, I meant push from the back of the playfield, so they are better leveled with the playfield and closer to the "plastic" thing (there is some "air" between the insert and this "thing".
When you are saying "push the inserts down", I suppose you mean the same, aren't you?

I will make some close shots of the inserts.

Cheers,
flugs

#987 4 years ago

Those inserts are "cupped".

That means that the center of the insert has sunken in compared to the outer edge.

We want to make the highest point of the insert (in this case, the edge) flush with the surface of the playfield.

You will then fill in the sunken center with clear, and then the playfield will be flat.

#988 4 years ago

Salut,

Back from my playroom.
I should have looked better in the first place.
In fact there is a giant mylar over the complete playfield.
There are the marks from the original installed mylar, which is only present at some spots (I have a second playfield, which has much more wear and which I wanted to swap).

Of course as you can imagine the mylar cannot be removed without taking some paint with it.

So I will change the plan and will fix the original playfield (which has only mylar around the bumper and the slingshots).

Here some images:

Playfield wear 01.jpg
Playfield wear 02.jpg
Playfield wear 03.jpg

The inserts are cupped as well on this one, but this can be fixed by filling them up with 2PAC.
I have started to clean it a bit to get the millions of visible impacts from the ball removed (I suppose these are impacts).
Once this done I will fill and level the inserts followed by a first layer of clearcoat prior the touchups.

Anyway, your tips from this thread will help me a lot for this project (if you have additional, please let me (us) know).

Thanks again Vid.

Cheers,
flugs

#989 4 years ago

Instead of trying to touch the worn area on my Bally Playboy I was thinking of using a Decal, is this a good idea, as you can see the paint has chipped and flaked off in the one area, and in front of the Sling Shots is a rounded mylar piece that the decal would have to go over, wouldn't it peel up in that area around the edge?

PB-PF_Image-584.JPG
PB Transfer set-815.JPG

#990 4 years ago
Quoted from REMPins:

Instead of trying to touch the worn area on my Bally Playboy I was thinking of using a Decal, is this a good idea?

A decal may not be a permanent solution (unless buried under the clearcoat), but it can make the game look superficially better.

A decal won't fix your cupped inserts, and depending on how deep they have sunk, may have a hard time adhering to them.

Quoted from REMPins:

as you can see the paint has chipped and flaked off in the one area, and in front of the Sling Shots is a rounded mylar piece that the decal would have to go over, wouldn't it peel up in that area around the edge?

It might start to lift up after a few years.

You could:

Try and remove the Mylar pieces (risky)

Put a large Mylar piece over the decal and lower playfield to keep the decal edge from being exposed.

Just accept that the decal won't last forever, and plan on replacing it in a few years.

#991 4 years ago

Salut,

I made some progress with my Future Spa playfield and I'm planning to apply the first fixing coat prior touchups next week.
Again a lot of hints from Vid where helping me during this process (flour + alcohol is a real time saver for mylar glue removal ).

As I have cleaned the hole playfield with Magic Eraser (as I understood this is a bit like sanding already), do I still need to sand it prior clear coating or could I just clean degreas the playfield and apply the coat (I hope I have not missed the answer somewhere in the thread)?

Thanks,
Cheers,
flugs

#992 4 years ago
Quoted from flugs:

As I have cleaned the hole playfield with Magic Eraser (as I understood this is a bit like sanding already), do I still need to sand it prior clear coating or could I just clean degreas the playfield and apply the coat (I hope I have not missed the answer somewhere in the thread)?

If the Magic Eraser has de-glossed the playfield already, you will have a lot less sanding to do.

Line the playfield up with a single source of light and sand any remaining gloss, sand your slots and holes, sand the shooter lane

#993 4 years ago

Hi, ok another question. My playfield is hardly flat (so to speak). Anyplace that had a post screwed into the surface is raised - so what is the best way to deal with this?

#994 4 years ago
Quoted from pinwillie:

Vid, can you recommend a hand scanner

alright ..i got my HP 4670 for 48$ free shipping off epay. It was missing the power cable so another 7$ for that.
so for 55$ i think i did ok.
Vid can you send me a link for the waterslide decal material
2014-07-27 09.42.27.jpg
Heres what I'm fixing

#995 4 years ago
Quoted from LongJohns:

Anyplace that had a post screwed into the surface is raised - so what is the best way to deal with this?

Tap down the mounds with a Doming punch, or even just the rounded handle end of a nut driver.

doming punch set.jpg

#996 4 years ago
Quoted from pinwillie:

Heres what I'm fixing

That's an expensive game....

Quoted from pinwillie:

Vid can you send me a link for the waterslide decal material

The good laser printer stuff:

http://www.decalpaper.com/category-s/3.htm

#998 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Tap down the mounds with a Doming punch, or even just the rounded handle end of a nut driver.

Ok thanks, that is what I thought, but how far do you tap it down? Is it better to go below (ideally level, which would be hard to get, or am I mistaken) and just fill with clear. Thinking that would be best since if left higher it would be harder to sand.

#999 4 years ago

It will probably spring back up in a few days, so you can tap it slightly below. Sometimes it perfectly levels out after springing back. .

#1000 4 years ago

1000

Any advice on larger waterslide? Can be difficult to lay down.

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From: $ 16.95
From: $ 140.00
From: $ 155.00
€ 3.95
Flipper Parts
Multigame
From: $ 10.00
Electronics
Third Coast Pinball
From: $ 369.95
Boards
PinSound
From: $ 155.00
$ 149.00
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