Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration

(Topic ID: 33446)

Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration


By vid1900

5 years ago



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There are 5853 posts in this topic. You are on page 17 of 118.
#801 4 years ago

The other problem with masks is people don't really do the fit checks properly. Placing your hands over the cartridges and inhaling should mean you get no air, just vacuum. Any leaking air means you are breathing fumes. If you can smell the chemicals while using it, you are way over the safe limit. Human noses are not good enough as a safety measure in this case.

1 week later
#802 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Some older pins were clearcoated with Lacquer.

I have a Gorgar and a Blackout whose playfields I'm thinking of touching up, but I don't know either of their histories in that area. Is there anything I need to do in order to get a playfield to a zero point before applying any kind of new clear coat? That is, do I need to worry about whether or not the original lacquer from the factory might still be on there (or perhaps some other unknown finish)? If so, how can I make sure that it's all been removed, and that any clear coat I apply will get a good bond with the playfield?

#803 4 years ago

2PAC hardens on it's own, and does not have to chemically melt the underlying layer.

You just lightly sand the old playfield with 800 grit to give the 2PAC some tooth and you are good to go.

You can always test under the apron for compatibility with iffy past coatings.

Every factory coating I've covered with 2PAC has worked fine.

Only trouble makers are junky past "repairs" like Testor's paints, Paint Markers, Sharpie pens or people who put silicone on the playfield like Pledge or Millwax.

#804 4 years ago

Vid, what is your opinion on high quality rattle can auto clear? I'm assuming it's slightly inferior to two part, but will gladly trade that for the tremendous convenience and cost savings.

#805 4 years ago

Page 2 goes into detail about how to use an airbrush to great effect, which is cool for more geometrically-themed playfields. But what about something like Gorgar? Is this something that has to be done by hand, or would you figure out a way to airbrush it because you're awesome?

IMG_1234.JPG

#806 4 years ago
Quoted from Anth:

Vid, what is your opinion on high quality rattle can auto clear? I'm assuming it's slightly inferior to two part, but will gladly trade that for the tremendous convenience and cost savings.

I've never used it, so I can't yet recommend it.

CONS: It costs more than mixing the 2 parts yourself, once you activate the spray can, you have 2 days to use it all up. No long term data of how it holds up hardness wise. Does it melt decals?

PROS: You don't need to borrow an air compressor, no measuring or mixing.

DIFFERENT: You probably have to spray it into a glass jar, then use a glass eyedropper to fill in cupped inserts.

#807 4 years ago
Quoted from UvulaBob:

Page 2 goes into detail about how to use an airbrush to great effect, which is cool for more geometrically-themed playfields. But what about something like Gorgar? Is this something that has to be done by hand, or would you figure out a way to airbrush it because you're awesome?

I'd probably use Frisket to repaint the red and yellow of that area, then use a clear waterslide decal to put the black detail back in place on top of the repair.

It's too hard to match a little "spot" of a bright color like yellow or orange because the repair color might fade at a different rate than the surrounding area over time. Especially because in his instance it is right under the player's nose.

Much easier to spray a larger area up to a distracting feature, like the Gorgar arm, the slingshot, the chick's butt.

#808 4 years ago

MORE STUFF YOU ARE GOING TO NEED TO CLEAR A PLAYFIELD.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.jpg

You are going to need a HVLP (High Volume Low Pressure) spray gun.

Do you need a $300 Devilbiss sprayer to lay down some clearcoat that looks like a sheet of glass? Hell no.

A Devilbiss is a nice gun, but we don't need anything that good. We are shooting a surface that is flat on it's back. We are not going to have any runs to worry about. We are going to do what painters call a "flood and go". It's so easy, you almost feel guilty that it does not require more skill.

The Harbor Freight gun can be had for $9-12 bucks on sale, so sign up for their email coupons. Buy a few if you want, they are cheaper than probably anything else you have ever bought for pinball.

-------------------------------------------------

You need an air regulator that installs right at the gun, you don't want to keep walking back to the compressor to adjust your air flow.

The gun says it wants 40psi to run, but don't be surprised if you need 45-50psi to get a silky flow.

You set it and forget it, so once you get it right, you won't have to think about anymore (unless you shoot other brand paints/clears with your gun). The guns and air regulator are so cheap, you might as well use a different gun for shooting clear and shooting paint.

-----------------------------------------------------

You want a little disposable air/moisture filter that attaches at the gun. These are $1-2.

Yes, I know you have a water filter at the compressor, but for $1, why not do it right?

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Teflon Tape.jpg

You need a little roll of Teflon Tape (.20 cents).

When you hear people complain that their spray gun leaked air "right out of the box", that is because they did not put Teflon Tape on all the connecting threads.

Every threaded air connection needs tape.

Make 3 full, smooth wraps, clockwise, at each joint, around the male threads.

Don't ever use "pipe dope" or putty on the threads. That will contaminate your air supply and gun.

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air kit.jpg

You need a $3 set of Air Connections.

The gun and valve does not come with any connections, so you need a few.

It's good to have some extras around because brass is soft and sometimes the ends get dented and leak.

-------------------------------------------------------

Finally you need a Dremel to clean out the insides of holes and slots.

#809 4 years ago

3.jpg

You need a Dremel (aka "rotary tool") to clean out the slots and holes.

Why?

If anyone ever used Pledge or Milwax on the playfield, that stuff contains a bunch of silicone (NEVER use Pledge or Milwax on any game that might be restored someday!). Silicone is just about impossible to remove from a playfield because Silicone is inert.

If you open the coin door on a game you want to restore and smell lemon Pledge - DO NOT BUY IT.

Even the slightest amount of Silicone will produce a dime sized "Fisheye" in the clear finish.

You hopefully can wipe enough of it off the flat surfaces, but around the holes, the Silicone can be impossible to remove so you get a big hole in the clear, right alongside the hole in the playfield.

We use the rotary tool with rough sandpaper to clean the holes and hopefully give enough tooth to the clear so that it can grab without the Silicone creating a Fisheye.

Some Emery Sticks can also be helpful in cleaning out the slots.

EMERY.jpg

#810 4 years ago

Marson-Smoothie-20240.jpg

Hey Vid: Won't Smoothie Fish Eye Eliminator prevent Fisheyes???

No.

Popular lore says that Smoothie will prevent Fisheyes in the clear. It works on clearing automobiles sometimes, but it is powerless against liquid silicones like Pledge or Millwax that have soaked into the pores and checks of the wood.

I've used both Smoothie and PPG Fisheye Eliminator and neither works all that well, you won't be impressed.

Worse yet, once you use it, every layer of clear applied afterwards will also require it. At least with straight clear, once you fix a few fisheyes, they don't ever return because the silicone is sealed under the first coat.

Also, once you contaminate your gun with all the silicones that Smoothie contains, you now have to always use it in that gun. The gun is "boogered".

Even the sanding dust from Smoothie clear can contaminate your shop with tiny molecules of silicone (that is why most high end auto refinishing joints won't let Smoothie in the door).

And it makes the clear coat a little less hard and take longer to cure.

Save your money.

85% of the time you will not get a single fisheye in your playfield (unless you have contaminated your gun and shop with silicone Smoothie), so why bother even getting started down that road?

#811 4 years ago

PinJones asked a few weeks ago: How many times should I empty and fill the air compressor before I start spraying to get the water out?

Zero times, actually.

I always hear somebody saying that you should completely drain the air tank, then charge it up again, then drain it again and finally recharge it one last time to get all the water out of the tank. This is nonsense.

The water that condenses in an air compressor actually comes from the atmosphere itself.

Every time you run the compressor, any moisture that is in the air is condensed and collects on the cooler temperature walls of the tank. This moisture rolls down to the bottom of the tank.

So if one filling of the compressor on a humid day nets you a 1/4 cup of water, filling and draining the tank 100 times will still, of course, net you a 1/4 cup of water, each time.

You will note that at the bottom of your tank there is a drain valve. Open this valve slightly until all the rusty water blows out and only clear air is emitted. This will probably take 5 seconds unless you have not drained your water in a few weeks (ever? lol).

Small "pancake" compressors often have a reverse threaded valve you turn to the Right to open; don't ask me why.

Large air compressors will often have an auto-drain that blows out the water at the very start of each cycle.

Back on page 5 we talked about how big of an air compressor to get:

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration/page/5

drain valve.jpg
DrainTank.jpg
pancake reverse valve.jpg

#812 4 years ago

water sep.jpg

The final air compressor accessory that is probably already installed on your compressor, is the oil/water separator filter.

This takes the air from the tank and removes any oils or water from it.

It is usually mounted on the tank with the air hose connector connected to the output of the filter (although you could mount it anywhere).

It has an IN and an OUT, so make sure your sprayer hose is connected to the OUT.

The separator is clear glass so you can see how much water has been pulled from the air supply.

Turn the valve on the bottom of the filter to blow out the captured water.

#813 4 years ago

Nice table saw.

#814 4 years ago

For applying the clear coat, people are recommending a 600 dollar air compressor. There's no way I'd come even close to working on enough machines to justify that cost. However, if the compressor I'd need to use when doing paint touch-ups doesn't need to be as powerful, I could at least do that part and try to find someone else to do the actual clear coat. What kind of air compressor would be acceptble if I were just wanting to use it for applying paint touch-ups?

EDIT: Already answered way back on page 2!

"You can use a regular shop air compressor (like a Pancake or 120 gallon garage monster), a dedicated "air brush" compressor, or even just canned airbrush air."

#815 4 years ago
Quoted from UvulaBob:

For applying the clear coat, people are recommending a 600 dollar air compressor.

You don't have to spend 600.

Craigslist has 1000s of old compressors that are much better than the ones made today.

Look in your neighbor's garage, you will see an upright 60 gallon compressor just sitting there "Yeah, we really only use it to fill the kid's air raft...."

You want an old Iron Headed compressor (test with a magnet), not a new aluminum head one.

Get a brand name like Speedair, Saylor, Ingersoll Rand...... those old compressors will run forever in home use. (Even an old Craftsman (USA made) will run for 20 years).

#816 4 years ago

Sorry to interfere in this clear coating discussion, but I have some question regarding fixing a playfield area by applying a decal.

I have a TZ playfield with a damage in front of the slot machine.
Here is a picture of the problem, with and without the mylar:

With the mylar
IMG_0353.JPG

Without...
IMG_0329.JPG

Considering the options available to fix it, and my poor skill in detail painting, I decided to go for a custom decal.
So I got a portable scanner, a Krylon clear-coat spray, some Laser clear water slide decals and some sheets of Avery to protect the fixed area.

photo 1.JPG

So here are the points where I'm not confident with:
- I will sand the area to clean it (which sandpaper granularity to use?)
- I will have to paint the area in white (any recommendation on the paint/white color tone to use?)
- about the scan, which boundaries should I respect to have the most invisible decal ?
- how can I get the same color on the decal printing ? There will probably be some differences between the scan and the real color obtained after printing

Any recommendation/advice are welcome ! Thanks.

#817 4 years ago
Quoted from Leo13:

I will sand the area to clean it (which sandpaper granularity to use?)

Use some Naphtha to clean out all that Sharpie (or it will bleed into the clear through the Bondo). It looks pretty roughed up already.

Then fill and level that hole with Bondo.

Quoted from Leo13:

I will have to paint the area in white (any recommendation on the paint/white color tone to use?)

I'd match the blue with the surrounding blue. Take your time and get it right.

You have a little white and gray to match too.

Quoted from Leo13:

how can I get the same color on the decal printing ? There will probably be some differences between the scan and the real color obtained after printing

I think I would just print the black, and leave the blue and the little bit of white and gray for air brushing.

#818 4 years ago

So in summary you won't use a decal for this fix, right ?

I've never done air brushing in my life, so it sounds scary to me to do it on a TZ playfield.
Also, in the blue area, there are some white dots I would prefer to reproduce to have the best result possible, and painting for this tiny details sound almost impossible to me.

Thanks for the advice on naphta/bondo.

#819 4 years ago
Quoted from Leo13:

So in summary you won't use a decal for this fix, right ?
I've never done air brushing in my life, so it sounds scary to me to do it on a TZ playfield.
Also, in the blue area, there are some white dots I would prefer to reproduce to have the best result possible, and painting for this tiny details sound almost impossible to me.
Thanks for the advice on naphta/bondo.

That's one of the great things about clearing a playfield before you start to work on it. If you don like how it is turning out then you can just sand the paint off at start over.

#820 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

I always hear somebody saying that you should completely drain the air tank, then charge it up again, then drain it again and finally recharge it one last time to get all the water out of the tank. This is nonsense.
The water that condenses in an air compressor actually comes from the atmosphere itself.

Bravo Vid. Good call out.

#821 4 years ago
Quoted from Leo13:

So in summary you won't use a decal for this fix, right ?

Yes, we DO want to use a decal, but a BLACK ink only decal on clear waterslide.

So paint your Blue, White and Gray patches - then put your Black decal on top to restore the details.

Here is the problem making a color decal:

1. The blue goes on FOREVER, so there is no way to make a decal that ends at the next distracting feature. Wherever the edge of your decal is, it is going to be in the middle of the blue field, and thus stick out like a sore thumb.

2. Your wear spot just about runs into the half-tone dots below. Handheld scanners are not good at keeping the dots in scale or alignment.

#822 4 years ago

way back on page 1 the harbor freight air brush was recommended. does anyone have experience or a thought on the compressor that can be purchased with it?

image_22140.jpg
#823 4 years ago

Is there a source online for high quality playfield scans?

#824 4 years ago
Quoted from LukeInOklahoma:

way back on page 1 the harbor freight air brush was recommended. does anyone have experience or a thought on the compressor that can be purchased with it?

image_22140.jpg 23 KB

I purchased the compressor to airbrush my Drac mod and have had no issues with it. Can't comment on the airbrush though.
Keith

#825 4 years ago

Hey vid, I have a local auto painter willing to throw another layer on my cpr repro. He's concerned about burning the paint around the holes. Does he have reason to be concerned?

Thanks, and thanks for this great thread.

#826 4 years ago

It already has a clear on it, so test under the apron. If all is well, then shoot away.

#827 4 years ago
Quoted from LukeInOklahoma:

way back on page 1 the harbor freight air brush was recommended. does anyone have experience or a thought on the compressor that can be purchased with it?

image_22140.jpg 23 KB

I use that complete set up and it works fine with my createx paints. Pushes enough PSI for the airbrush and has a nice water seperator already.

-Jim

#828 4 years ago

Anyone have a source to find the 3M plastic adhesive primer mentioned in the insert fixing part of this guide?

Can't find it at Amazon, Wal-Mart, or any of my usual places.

#829 4 years ago
Quoted from KloggMonkey:

Anyone have a source to find the 3M plastic adhesive primer mentioned in the insert fixing part of this guide?
Can't find it at Amazon, Wal-Mart, or any of my usual places.

http://www.grainger.com/product/3M-Primer-2RUF7

Zoro Tools used to sell it cheaper, but looks like they no longer carry it.

#830 4 years ago

That's a bummer. I got mine from zero tools and it was a lot cheaper. Although two ounces should last forever.

#831 4 years ago

Here is a problem that I had that Vid helped me out with a couple of days ago.

I'm restoring a Space Invaders playfield and used clear-backed water slide decals, which I never had problems with until the other day. The one in particular had to be placed on a black area (the little red aliens). The pf already had a light prep coat of clear on it. When I wiped the decal with naptha, the decal area was cloudy while the rest of the pf was a deep rich color. I had printed the graphic several times on the sheets so I tried a few more. I even tried different sheets from the same printing batch. Same thing, the decal looked like frosted scotch tape if that makes sense.

Vid suggested I try a new sheet in the pack (I bought a batch of 20) of decal paper and test. That worked, so I reprinted the decals, applied and tested and it came out perfect. I sprayed a few coats of clear and it looks great!

The only thing I can think of what caused this was that the decals were old, I printed the batch 5 or 6 months ago. So make sure you apply fresh recently printed decals.

Thanks again Vid!

#832 4 years ago
Quoted from erichill:

http://www.grainger.com/product/3M-Primer-2RUF7
Zoro Tools used to sell it cheaper, but looks like they no longer carry it.

Thanks, your link led me to more info.
It seems its proper name is 3M Scotch-Weld Instant Adhesive Primer AC77, but seems like almost nobody has it unless you want a case, gallon, or some stupid large amount of it.(other than your link)

20 bucks + shipping seems like a lot for just this maybe there's an alternate course of action.

#833 4 years ago

CUPPED INSERT REPAIR

================================================

Before we clear a playfield, we often need to repair it first.

One common problem is cupped inserts.

Common pinball folklore says that hot, incandescent bulbs melted the cupped inserts; but even NOS playfields have them, so that can't be the case.

Old inserts that are not reinforced with jeweling, will simply cup from being made too thin and the pressure of the surrounding wood.

You almost never see a cupped jeweled insert.

-

Q: Shouldn't I take them out and sand them flat?

A: No, they are too thin already.

-

Q: Shouldn't I take them out, heat them up and flatten them again?

A: It's risky and they will cup again in a few years.

We want to avoid removing inserts whenever possible. Many styles have not be made in years, so you are unlikely to find replacements should you break one during removal.

-

So what do the pros do? They fill the cupping with 2PAC.

This reinforces the insert, making it stronger, and less likely to cup further.

We also know that the cupping fix is compatible with our clearcoat.

#834 4 years ago

Here we have a 30 year old New Old Stock playfield.

These old playfields hardly have any clearcoat at all (it was just silkscreened on), so they need to be protected with a real coat of clear. Even in home use, a nicked ball will destroy these fragile playfields in no time at all.

If we don't fix this cupped insert, it will launch air balls, deflect ball travel, and of course cause deep wear around it's edge.

CUPPED.jpg

#835 4 years ago

So first we epoxy all the inserts from the back of the playfield to keep them from moving once they are heated by the lights.

Any inserts that are proud of the playfield are heated up and pressed back in flat with a 12" C-clamp, and then glued:

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration

Then we take some 800 grit sandpaper and sand off the gloss. This gives some tooth to the 2PAC so it does not "ghost" .

Don't sand too much or you will wear away the paint on the insert. There is VERY little clear coat on these old playfields.

#836 4 years ago

Blow off any sanding dust and then clean out the insert and the surrounding area with Naphtha. Once you clean it with Naphtha, don't get any oily fingerprints or dust near the insert.

Put your respirator on and find a glass substrate to mix the 2PAC on. You can use an upside down pickle jar.

Using 2 different glass eyedroppers, drip the correct ratio of Clear & Hardener onto the mixing surface.

Remember not to get even a single drop of hardener into the can of clear, or the whole can of clear will become a cube of plastic in a month. This is why we use 2 different eye droppers.

Depending on how many inserts you have to fill, you need to mix up your clear, by counting drops. Each insert might need 12 drops of clear, so your ratio might be 10 drops clear : 5 drops hardener.

Use the fastest curing hardener you can for this. The faster it cures, the less chance of any outgassing from the insert (more on this latter).

Mix up the clear and then let it sit for 5 minutes to allow any bubbles to dissipate.

Draw the clear up into an eyedropper without creating any bubbles.

"Draw" around the edge of the insert with the clear, so as you fill it, the clear will climb to the very top edge.

Overfill the insert slightly, it will get sanded flush.

Suck out, or drag out any air bubbles with the eyedropper.

You can fill in the valley between the inserts and the playfield with this same technique.

CUPPED-3.jpg

Once the 2PAC had hardened, you can then sand it flat with the rest of the playfield.

#837 4 years ago

In this thread are two people whose work I admire greatly - Vid and Whridlsoncestood. The problem is that Vid recommends automotive clear coat and Whrid uses Varathane by the gallon.

Now, Vid's right. We humans love easy. But we also love returns on our investment - either money or time. Varathane is considerably cheaper, money and effort-wise if not time-wise, to apply to a playfield than automotive clear coat. But Vid makes a pretty strong case for why Varathane is a bad idea for a playfield.

I'm wondering if any actual science has been done to compare playfields finished with Varathane veruss ones finished with ACC and how each of them holds up over time. I'm less concerned about the ultimate victor, since I'm pretty sure that ACC will win out. But I'm more concerned about the conditions under which Varathane would make someone regret not putting in the effort to use ACC (whether self-applied or paying a local business to do it). What kind of degredation have people started to see after two years? Five years? Ever?

Has anyone done such science?

#838 4 years ago

I'm pretty sure Varathane has a dulling effect on the playfield's colors right from the get go. Especially when you use it to "fill" things, like cupped inserts. Check out the PARAGON inserts in this thread after being filled with Varathane. http://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/paragon-playfield-players-restoration

#839 4 years ago
Quoted from UvulaBob:

But I'm more concerned about the conditions under which Varathane would make someone regret not putting in the effort to use ACC (whether self-applied or paying a local business to do it). What kind of degredation have people started to see after two years? Five years? Ever?

You don't even have to wait 2 years, the moment the Varathane dries, you see that all the colors are now dulled down.

Then once you start playing the game, you see how fast ball trails start cutting through the Varathane.

Quoted from UvulaBob:

Varathane is considerably cheaper, money and effort-wise if not time-wise, to apply to a playfield than automotive clear coat.

Time wise, 2PAC is much faster.

Varathane takes probably 10 coats to build up as much film as a single coat of 2PAC.

And, that coat of 2PAC is dry in a hour. How long would it take 10 coats of Varathane to apply and dry?

-

Varathane is good to let your kids use on an art project, but it looks terrible on floors and is not suitable for pinball playfields.

#840 4 years ago

Much like the agonizing wait for the next book in a certain sweeping medieval fantasy series, I'm on the edge of my seat waiting for Vid to get to the part where he tells us how long to wait after a given coat before we can sand it down and apply the next one.

I've been calling around and most auto body shops here require a 2-hour minimum charge for labor and materials, and they all seem pretty insistent that sanding in between coats is highly inadvisable.The spec sheet for the JC661 says that new coats go on about ten minutes apart, but polish time is recommended to be 6 to 8 hours.

So, how should the actual application and in-between-coat sanding go? Do you have to wait six hours before sanding, or can the whole application/sanding/application process be done over a short period of time?

#841 4 years ago
Quoted from UvulaBob:

Much like the agonizing wait for the next book in a certain sweeping medieval fantasy series, I'm on the edge of my seat waiting for Vid to get to the part where he tells us how long to wait after a given coat before we can sand it down and apply the next one.

Every brand of 2PAC is different, and every brand has different speed hardeners that can be used with it. So like George Martin would say, YMMV.

Many restorers sand the next day. If you wait a week, it is much harder to sand.

If your last coat came out perfect you might not even need to sand at all, wait 15 minutes and top coat it.

Sometimes the last coat comes out perfect, and you don't even have anything to buff out.

2PAC tends to "wall up" around holes in the playfield, so you may end up sanding to make the playfield dead flat.

#842 4 years ago

So, it looks like if I'm going to do this, I need to find someone willing to work in short bursts instead of charging me for two-hour minimums. Maybe Craigslist can help me out.

The alternative is buying a big compressor, building a collapsible paint tent in my garage and buying all the safety gear I need to not turn my lungs into solid blocks of urethane.

#843 4 years ago

For many people, a good single coat of 2PAC is all they need and they would be very happy with the results.

It would be better than any factory clearcoat.

For others, spraying, flattening and buffing to absolute perfection is their goal.

Quoted from UvulaBob:

The alternative is buying a big compressor,

A big compressor is a great workshop dream, but remember, you can do it with a cheap 28 gallon too.

#844 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

For many people, a good single coat of 2PAC is all they need and they would be very happy with the results.

What, whaaa? /mindblown

It's possible that I've been conflating the Varathane clear coat process with the 2PAC process. With Varathane, you need to sand in between each coat, right?

Meanwhile, I have also seen the video of the guy using 2PAC to coat his playfield with a ten-cent dust mask. (If it's the guy I'm thinking of, he's a big fan of "Noovis 2".) He puts down, like, five coats with copious amounts of wet sanding in between. Are you saying that I might not need to do all that work? That a single coat (after that initial light coat to lock down wood fibers and lay the touch-ups on top of) would probably do it?

I'll just wait for your next update and see how the pro does it.

#845 4 years ago

You don't want to make the clear too thick.

We've all seen those playfields that look like they came in out of an ice storm - don't do that.

Sometimes you have to coat and sand back and coat again to flatten, but many times 2-3 coats and you are done.

I'm going to be posting some real life examples of a few common scenarios to help guide you through.

#846 4 years ago

Also it seems that some people will confuse a "coat" with a "session"

I may not be doing it right but I learned from a guy that used to paint cars. For each clear coat "session" I do I start with a mist coat and then I put 2 normal coats on. These coats are usually 15 min apart and the clear is tacky with no strings when you touch it. A lot of the clear is block sanded off and then repairs are done. I may do this 4 times for a playfield with all the different paint and decals that need to be applied. I also dont wet sand until I am finished with the last session and sanding for that perfect look. I dry sand between sessions.

I have had great results but I look forward to learning more from this guide.

#847 4 years ago

This is somewhat OT but type of wax do you recommend and how long should you wait before applying to make sure the 2PAC is fully cured?

#848 4 years ago
Quoted from mac622:

This is somewhat OT but type of wax do you recommend and how long should you wait before applying to make sure the 2PAC is fully cured?

The 2PAC cures chemically rather than by evaporation, so it's not like Poly where you have to wait a month.

Different brands require different cure times.

Try putting your nose next to it and see if it still stinks. If it does not smell like solvent, wax with Blitz 1 Grand and then populate.

#849 4 years ago

Perfect - thanks!

#850 4 years ago

Vid-

I'm wondering if I could get your opinion on a specific situation, and hopefully not derail this too much.

I've got a nice playfield under mylar, and I've nearly convinced myself that I don't want to pull it - just want to get it into shape as a good players machine. However, there are some problem areas. Most noticeably near the horseshoe:

IMG_0153.JPG

So the questions are:

1) Should the mylar actually come up because its in such bad shape in this area, and much less worse in a couple others?
2) Is it possible and/or advisable to remove just the troubled section of mylar, decal the terrible section of the PF, and re-mylar?

I don't really want to clear this PF as I think it would be a waste of resources for a being not in mint condition.

Thanks in advance
A.

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