Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration

(Topic ID: 33446)

Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration


By vid1900

5 years ago



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#751 4 years ago
Quoted from Bangagong85:

That is a bummer. I went ahead and ordered it probably an hour before your post. Oh well, I'll see what it can do for me, after all, I have no experience and not really any kind of detailed work to do with it. Thanks for the tip anyway, I'll let you know how it works out.

I would not worry too much about that air brush.

If it does not work, you can get a completely serviceable one on sale at HF for $12 and just throw the TCP one away.

http://www.harborfreight.com/deluxe-airbrush-kit-95810.html

#752 4 years ago

Vid or any of you awesome folk with experience,

There are a couple of small areas on my machine that are too detailed to airbrush, so I purchased a nice hand-scanner and decided to go the water-slide decal route. I am already good with Photoshop, so fixing the art is a non-issue. I did three specific areas and then brought them to FedEx Office to have them color laser printed onto the decal material.

Obviously I will finish any touch-up airbrush painting before I add decals. Also, these are NOT insert decals, they are decals for the surface of the playfield. Can anyone give me a run down of the process for applying these, starting with how the playfield should be prepared?

I would imagine I can't place these down on smooth paint. But how should the surface be? How see through (or translucent) are these decals going to be? Will I see color and details through them once I apply them? I've got really high end (900dpi) decals made, they look awesome, and of course I could reprint them if necessary, but I really just want to get it right from the start.

Thanks!

#753 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

I would not worry too much about that air brush.
If it does not work, you can get a completely serviceable one on sale at HF for $12 and just throw the TCP one away.
http://www.harborfreight.com/deluxe-airbrush-kit-95810.html

As I mentioned, I think that TCP One is horrifically bad. I purchased a cheap one for $14 from a local big box hardware chain, it's even a little maddening, but 1000 times better than that TCP airbrush. I meant to make it to Harbor Freight this weekend to just nab the one you keep talking about, but the weekend once again slipped away from me. Oh well.

#754 4 years ago
Quoted from MinnPin:

Vid or any of you awesome folk with experience,
There are a couple of small areas on my machine that are too detailed to airbrush, so I purchased a nice hand-scanner and decided to go the water-slide decal route. I am already good with Photoshop, so fixing the art is a non-issue. I did three specific areas and then brought them to FedEx Office to have them color laser printed onto the decal material.
Obviously I will finish any touch-up airbrush painting before I add decals. Also, these are NOT insert decals, they are decals for the surface of the playfield. Can anyone give me a run down of the process for applying these, starting with how the playfield should be prepared?
I would imagine I can't place these down on smooth paint. But how should the surface be? How see through (or translucent) are these decals going to be? Will I see color and details through them once I apply them? I've got really high end (900dpi) decals made, they look awesome, and of course I could reprint them if necessary, but I really just want to get it right from the start.
Thanks!

Did you have them printed on clear or white? If you did clear then you will be able to see everything through them. This is how I touch up a faded cabinet. It brings all the colors back out. If you printed then on white then you should be good except that you will see a white outline of where you cut. I try an cut on a black line and then carefully paint the white outline.

Are you going to clear before you put them on?

#755 4 years ago

Vid,

What kind of compressor do you use for airbrushing, all I have is a 20 gallon husky, I imagine that is a bit of overkill and not properly suited to airbrushing...

#756 4 years ago
Quoted from MinnPin:

Can anyone give me a run down of the process for applying these, starting with how the playfield should be prepared?

http://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration/page/3

Quoted from MinnPin:

But how should the surface be?

Put the decals over a thin layer of clear coat. The clear should be finely sanded, and not glossy.

Quoted from MinnPin:

How see through (or translucent) are these decals going to be?

If you bought clear waterslides, very translucent. If you bought White waterslides, not so much.

#757 4 years ago
Quoted from shimoda:

What kind of compressor do you use for airbrushing, all I have is a 20 gallon husky, I imagine that is a bit of overkill and not properly suited to airbrushing...

I use a 200 gallon Saylor-Beall for both airbrushing and clearcoating.

No such thing as overkill when it comes to compressors. The larger the tank, the less it cycles on and off.

#758 4 years ago

Air compressors are without a doubt one of those things you can never go too big with.

1 week later
#759 4 years ago

I re-read this whole thread and love all the info provided! This really helps us first timers!

I have a virtually perfect condition Indy 500 playfield. When waxing it the other day, I noticed the Turbo lock arrow inserts were lifted slightly. I know for a fact that when I first got this machine in December, they were flat so I am very concerned that they will keep lifting and further break the clear coat (the clear on only one corner of one arrow seems to be lifting at the moment).

I do not want to remove the inserts and glue them back in as the playfield does not need refinishing.

Whats the best approach to pushing these flat and re-gluing them? Simply put a block of wood on them with a C-clamp and dab epoxy on the back of the insert? Do I need to use heat to get the insert to move?

Would CA or epoxy from the back hold better?

Goal is to preserve the existing finish and keep the inserts flat!

Thanks in advance for the advise!

#760 4 years ago
Quoted from Schwaggs:

Whats the best approach to pushing these flat and re-gluing them? Simply put a block of wood on them with a C-clamp and dab epoxy on the back of the insert? Do I need to use heat to get the insert to move?

Yep, warm it up and push it back flush. Epoxy from the backside to keep it from rising again.

#761 4 years ago

Thanks Vid. Is the C clamp only needed for inserts that will not stay flat or will I need that to get it to move at all?

The reason I am asking as I do not have a 12" C clamp and was wondering if I should get one before attempting to fix this.

Also, what are the chances that this will stay flat in home use for the long term?

#762 4 years ago

I would think anytime you are gluing an insert you would want to use the clamp to ensure they don't move at all before the glue cures.

#763 4 years ago
Quoted from Schwaggs:

Is the C clamp only needed for inserts that will not stay flat or will I need that to get it to move at all?

The C clamp just makes it easy.

Sometimes you glue an insert and it pops up the moment you turn your back.

For the $8 investment, it won't be the last time you use a 12" C clamp.

#764 4 years ago

For the life of me, I cannot cut frisket on my playfield without leaving a scratch through the existing paint.

I am using brand new blades, just like the ones I pictured in an earlier post. I am using the blade at only a slight angle, so as to not put the pointed tip directly into the playfield and yet I am still having problems.

This is creating a mental road block to me finishing this playfield. Ideas? Tips? How is this so easy for everyone?

Thanks, as always!

#765 4 years ago

Did you ever cut Rubylith doing silk screening?

Let the weight of the Xacto do the work.

Use real Xacto blades, not some knockoffs.

If you are cutting up the playfield, you are pressing 3x too hard.

Relax, use a straightedge on the straightaways....

#766 4 years ago

Thanks Vid. I think relax is the key.

As far as blades, I am using the ones I bought that I pictured back a few posts. They are real XActo, in fact they are the high end with the sharpest cutting edge that is made of some alloy (I forget the details). They are the best blades I have ever had.

Anywho...thanks again, I will get my nerve up and give it another crack.

Additional question - if you have an area where it's not worn out or uneven, but it is just faded (in this case the black area in general is not quite as black as it once was, would you bother spraying that down with black? The shade of black doesn't change (at least to the human eye), it is just all slightly lower than a fresh black coat would be.

#767 4 years ago

Wet the faded black with Naphtha and see if it darkens.

That's how dark it will be when you clear it.

1 week later
#768 4 years ago

CLEARCOATING PLAYFIELDS

=============================================================

In this next section we are going to discuss Clearcoating Playfields.

Nothing about playfield restoration has more misinformation than the clearcoating process.

I'm going to walk you guys through clearcoating with just normal tools you can find anywhere. Sure I've got a bunch of high end HVLP guns, but I'm going to show you how to do it with a $12 gun and get totally pro results.

I'm also going to stress SAFETY. You will probably get tired of me talking about it, but it's the most important topic of this whole section.

#769 4 years ago

Yeah, isocyanates are no joke. My wife told me I looked like Marty McFly from BTTF when I cleared TFTC because of all the gear I had.

#770 4 years ago

THE GREAT PRETENDERS:

People love easy, it's human nature.

They want to just go to Home Depot, walk out with a can of clear, go home to their basement, clear a playfield with a brush and put it back in the machine a day or two latter.

As this is the Ultimate playfield restoration guide, were not going to be doing anything like that.

Lets look at some unacceptable products for clearing playfields:

Poly oil.jpg

Pretender #1: Polyurethane

Poly is what people think of when they think "clear protective finish".

This "oil based" clear turns yellow as it ages, even if it claims non-yellowing formula.

Some formulas dry fast, but don't actually get hard for months (even a month latter the "finger nail test" lets you leave a mark).

After a few months of drying, it can be buffed to a medium shine.

Vapors are very toxic.

Do not use Oil Based Poly on a playfield!

--------------------------------------------------------------

polycryl water.jpgW3AS.jpg

Pretender #2: Water Based Poly

This "water based" Poly (sometimes sold as Varathane or Polycrylic), cleans up with water.

The number one reason we don't use it for playfields is that it dulls the colors of the underlying playfield in a serious way. It does not make much sense to do all that work fixing up a playfield, only to dull down the color pallet.

Water Based Poly yellows over time, but not as much as oil-based Poly.

The finish drys very fast, but it takes 3 coats of Water Based Poly to build up the same thickness film of a single coat of Oil Poly. So you need many more coats to get the same protection, but each extra coat is further dulling the colors.

The can says that Water Based Poly is "tougher" than Oil Poly, but on a playfield, ball trails start cutting their way through much more quickly than with Oil .

Water Based Poly can be buffed to a medium gloss, but not as high as other clearcoats.

The vapors give you a headache, but they say it is non-toxic.

Water Based Poly makes a good primer over raw wood if you are going to paint over it, as otherwise the paint may soak into the wood fibers. Because it drys fast, it is ideal for this use.

Do not use Water Based Poly as a clearcoat on a playfield!

Here is a great example from Tdiddy, where the water based poly is peeling away from the substrate. This is not a hard, protective finish, folks:

Tdiddy playfid.jpg

NEVER USE POLY TO 'CLEARCOAT' A PLAYFIELD (p68)

Another well documented Varathane disaster:

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rant-the-nightmare-of-cleatcoating-my-gottlieb-hot-shot#post-3936888

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

lacc.jpg

Pretender #3: Lacquer

Lacquer is a fun clear coat for many things because it drys super fast and you don't have to sand between coats.

You don't have to sand between coats because Lacquer is very "hot". It chemically melts into the lower layers, becoming a single layer.

Lacquer can be buffed to a very high gloss.

The bad things about Lacquer are that it turns slightly yellow, it is so hot that it often reacts tragically with other coatings and paints, and it melts decals like nothing else on the planet.

Some older pins were clearcoated with Lacquer.

Vapors are very toxic.

Do not use Lacquer to clearcoat a playfield!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

1024px-Shellac_varities.png

Pretender #4: Shellac

Shellac is made from the bodies of the Laccifera Lacca insect. It is actually safe to eat, and is used as the coating on Reese's Pieces and fruits like apples.

Shellac has a yellow to amber color to it, and can actually be purchased in different shades.

Shellac flakes are simply dissolved in alcohol and then applied.

Some older pins were actually "clear coated" with Shellac (test under the apron if the finish dissolves with alcohol).

In playfield restoration we use Shellac in layers to match freshly sanded wood to the surrounding wood. Newly sanded wood is bright white, and stands out like a sore thumb. Spraying layers of Shellac allows you to match darker older wood easily.

Vapor are mildly toxic (alcohol).

Shellac is not very durable as a clearcoat, but is does have a place in your tool kit.

#771 4 years ago

Looking forward to the extended clear section , are you going to cover off 2part rattle cans as well?

#772 4 years ago

Eager to learn more !

#773 4 years ago

OOOH - shellac looks useful after sanding down the ball trail on the bare wood part of EMs...

#774 4 years ago

Hello,

Sorry if you've answered this before but I am doing water slide decals on my playfield and as expected I am getting a thin white border around them. Do you recommend a paint or a specific marker type to do the touch ups? Luckily all my decals have black borders around them so it shouldn't be too difficult. Thanks !

#775 4 years ago
Quoted from ArcadiusMaximus:

Hello,
Sorry if you've answered this before but I am doing water slide decals on my playfield and as expected I am getting a thin white border around them. Do you recommend a paint or a specific marker type to do the touch ups? Luckily all my decals have black borders around them so it shouldn't be too difficult. Thanks !

Let's see a picture of what you have there.

#776 4 years ago

THE PROPER CHOICE FOR CLEAR COATING

----------------------------------------------------------------------

So above, we ran through all the choices of what we don't want to use to clear a playfield, so what CAN we use?

2 Part Auto Clear (2PAC).

2PAC is the stuff the pros use (and soon you will too).

It REALLY protects the playfield from wear.

It does not yellow.

It makes the playfield colors pop.

It has UV blockers to keep your painted or printed repairs from fading at a different rate than the rest of the paints.

It is hard in an hour, and crazy hard in a week.

It is ready for another coat in 5 minutes.

It buffs to the highest shine (although you can latter knock down the shine to match older EMs, if you want)

It is compatible with acrylic paints and Waterslide decals commonly used for repair.

It can be used to fill in cupped or shrunken inserts so they are level with the rest of the playfield.

It can be mixed with different hardeners so the speed that it catalyzes can be controlled.

There is currently no better clearcoat choice available on the market.

#777 4 years ago

There are probably 100 different 2PAC brands and formula on the market, so what do I recommend ?

PPG JC660 (or it's plain labeled cousin "Omni 161" )

It is the most forgiving 2PAC I've found for the beginner. Literally, a beginner can lay down a layer of this stuff their first time out, with a $12 HVLP gun and stand back and say DA-HAMMMMMM!

It is available everywhere PPG paints are sold (over 2000 dealers in the USA).

It has 3 different speeds of hardener.

It is less "hot" than the old DuPont Imron DiamondPlate that Williams used to use (I have 5 gallons of DP, and it is HOT stuff).

Vapors are very toxic

http://www.bapspaint.com/docs/psheets/PPG/Automotive/Shopline/JC661.pdf

----

Now, like I said, there are 100s of other choices and experienced auto painters are all going to religiously preach about their favorite brand. If someone is familiar with another brand and how it lays up, or has a friend who gets it "free" at work, or got laid once because they cleared their Trans-Am with it, more power to them.

JC660l.jpg

#778 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Let's see a picture of what you have there.

Below you can see the white outlines of the decals. TBH the camera flash makes it stand out more than it does to the normal eye, but its still there and kind of bothers me. Thoughts?


IMAG0494.jpg

#779 4 years ago
Quoted from ArcadiusMaximus:

Below you can see the white outlines of the decals.

Clear over them and then you can touch up the edge if it is still visible.

#780 4 years ago
Quoted from ArcadiusMaximus:

Below you can see the white outlines of the decals. TBH the camera flash makes it stand out more than it does to the normal eye, but its still there and kind of bothers me. Thoughts?

These look like vinyl decals rather than water slide style, and are therefore significantly thicker and probably printed on a white substrate? If you do more in the future I would brush a bit of black paint the sides of the decals before applying them, that should help the edge blend in with the black outline art.

#781 4 years ago

Did another test tonight. Used black Createx paint on the edges. Came out pretty well. Could use some more touchups here and there. Thanks for the tip !

IMAG0495.jpg

#782 4 years ago
Quoted from ArcadiusMaximus:

Used black Createx paint on the edges. Came out pretty well. Could use some more touchups here and there.

Looks good.

Just to qualify, those are waterslide and not vinyl decals, correct?

#783 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Looks good.
Just to qualify, those are waterslide and not vinyl decals, correct?

Yes, they are water slide. I know they look a bit thick but I think its a mixture of the angle and how close the camera is. They are very thin to the touch.

#784 4 years ago

I stopped using white waterslide decal paper and now only use clear for this reason. This means that I have to "white out" with my airbrush whatever I intend to decal and clear over it before I apply the decal.

#785 4 years ago

STUFF YOU ARE GOING TO NEED TO CLEAR A PLAYFIELD.

--------------------------

1-718.jpg

You are gong to need a pile of stuff to clear a playfield. Even if you are not going to clear anything today, you might as well start getting all your supplies in order.

The first chemical you are going to need is Naphtha. It is usually sold as VM&P Naphtha (Varnish Maker & Painter's Naphtha). It has little odor, but is a carcinogen, so you need to wear your chem mask while using it. Naphtha evaporates very fast and won't dissolve our playfield touch-up work. We clean everything with Naphtha before we clear.

-

The next chemical you need is Lacquer Thinner. This is nasty stuff that dissolves many finishes. We use it to clean our spray guns, eye droppers, measuring cups, spills. DON'T use Lacquer Thinner to clean your playfield. Lacquer Thinner is a mega carcinogen, so again, chem mask needed during use.

-

Next you need the Clearcoat itself and the hardener. Unlike Poly, the 2PAC will not just air dry. The hardener acts as a catalyst and chemically turns the clearcoat hard as a rock. You must be very careful to never even get a drop of the hardener into the can of clearcoat - if you do, in about a month the entire can will turn into a solid cube of plastic. So again, do not dip an eyedropper into one can and then use it in the other!

The clear is mixed with the hardener in a 2 ratio, so a half cup of clear to a quarter cup of hardener. Or 10 drops of clear to 5 drops of hardener if you are mixing small batches to level inserts.

Don't mix the clear in any old plastic or foam cup, because the clear will become contaminated as it melts the plastic. Use a glass measuring cup and do it right. The store you buy the clear at will have disposable plastic measuring cups that are solvent safe, but I like to reuse the glass and keep the plastic out of the landfill.

Most of the time I use the Medium speed hardener, but the fast can be useful when we don't want to have decals dissolve, or we don't want out-gassing bubbles in old Bally playfield inserts (more on that latter). So you might buy a small can of Fast hardener to have on hand along with the Medium.

The clear contains super toxic Isocyanates (as the names implies, it contains cyanide) so you don't want to breathe it into your lungs. Isocyanates don't have a smell, so the company that makes the clear adds the most horrific smell to the formula. It smells like a mixture of Chlorine and Puke. If your chem-mask is leaking, you will know it!

Yes, I've seen the videos on Youtube with the guy shooting 2PAC with just a "10 cent dust mask", but that is the most insane thing I've ever seen. DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT.

-
paint-respirator.jpg

Next you need the all important Chem-mask. You can get one at the store that sells you the clear for $29. Home Depot sells an Isocyanate rated mask, but it is not with the other dust masks, it's in the isle with the Mold abatement products. Don't ask me why.

You need to wear the Chem-mask anytime you spray clear, rattle can paint, work with solvents (Naphtha, Toluene, Lacquer Thinner...) or sand painted cabinets (commercial products continued to use lead paint well into the 2000s - you can safely assume any pinball cabinet is painted with lead paint). Do not sand pinball cabinets in your basement or garage - you will NEVER get the lead dust out.

Your Chem-mask only works if it is sealed to your face. That means you need to shave the day of the spraying. That means you people with fancy facial hair are going to need to shave the mask's pattern through it.

You need to keep the mask in it's thick zip-lock bag when not in use. The chem part of the mask lasts about 40 hours of use, and then you can start to smell the stench of the clear. Don't continue if you can smell the clear - stop and replace the cartridges!

-

If you start clearing playfields all the time, it makes sense to switch to a full hood that supplies outside air . The $350 cost of the hood will pay for itself in replacement cartridges and it is much more comfortable to wear. You can even wear it with a full beard.

SAR.JPG

Next you need some packs of Tackcloths. Tackcloths are Cheesecloth covered in resin that grabs even the smallest particles of dust. Even stuff that won't blow off with the Airgun, will be removed by the Tackcloth.

tackcloth.jpg

You will need some fine 800 to 1000 grit sandpaper. They probably won't have it at Home Depot, but they will have it at the place that sells you the clear.

800 grit.jpg

An Airgun or Blowgun attaches to your air compressor hose and lets you blow off fine dust out of the nooks, slots and holes. It is also great for blowing 40 years of dust and mold spores out of old cabinets (do this outside, not in your garage).

blowgun.jpg

#786 4 years ago

Wish I would have read this before sanding an old Joust arcade cabinet in my garage, with a dust mask on......

#787 4 years ago

I use to work at a silkscreen shop. I used paint thinner and lacquer thinner daily without a mask. I never once had a cold or had the flu in those 10 years.

Take vid1900's advice and get yourself a good mask.

#788 4 years ago
Quoted from MrArt2u:

I stopped using white waterslide decal paper and now only use clear for this reason. This means that I have to "white out" with my airbrush whatever I intend to decal and clear over it before I apply the decal.

Yup, that's how I do it too. A little more work, but it gives you a much better result, with more control. Mask off your area, lay down a white base coat, and clear decal over it. You can really feather your edges to invisible that way.

#789 4 years ago

vid I got impatient and charged ahead with my first clearcoat before you got to writing this stuff up, luckily I already absorbed the important shit like safety. But this is really invaluable information, I would have devoured it before my project, thanks for taking the time.

#790 4 years ago

MORE SAFETY EQUIPMENT YOU NEED
-------------------------------------------------------------

You will need some Nitrile gloves. These are usually black in color. You don't want paint, clear, or solvents ever in contact with your skin. Regular latex gloves will allow the solvents to soak right through them easily. A box of 100 is usually $7.

Nit gloves.jpg

You of course need a Tyvek "bunny suit" . They are $10. Get the size above whatever the package recommends for your height, because the chart is always too small in actual use.

tyvek.jpg

You need some airtight goggles, as safety glasses wont keep the vapor out of your eyes. You can even just use swim goggles if you have them already.

swim gog.jpg

You need a roll of plastic sheeting. The mist from the clear goes EVERYWHERE. It will escape and cover your wife's car, your other games, your entire garage would be coated if you don't tape off a "clearing booth".

Taping off a booth will keep dust from settling all over your fresh clear. You can even wet the garage floor with a hose just before spraying to further keep the dust off the playfield.

Just buy the super thin cheap .31 mil plastic that painters cover windows with - not the expensive 9 mil "drop cloth" stuff. You are not going to be walking on it.

plastic sheet.jpg

#791 4 years ago
Quoted from MinnPin:

Vid says clearing in the driveway will open the surface up to airborne gunk.

I trust Vid and his advice...
but I can tell you I've cleared 5 PF... including Star Trek: The Mirror Universe in my driveway.
I haven't yet gotten around to building a temporary paint booth.

That said; I'm not recommending someone ignore the booth "requirement"... just stating that I've had success without it. If your piece will be sold eventually; better do it right the first time.

#792 4 years ago

I'm gonna do this!

#793 4 years ago
Quoted from Zitt:

but I can tell you I've cleared 5 PF... including Star Trek: The Mirror Universe in my driveway.

That's only because you have a Texas Driveway.

The rest of us have dust, bugs, leaves, Maple Helicopters, Dandelion fuzz, and bird crap to ruin our mirror finishes.

#794 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

That's only because you have a Texas Driveway.
The rest of us have dust, bugs, leaves, Maple Helicopters, Dandelion fuzz, and bird crap to ruin our mirror finishes.

Oh... I have stuff like that to. Usually beard hair.
I have picked a bug or two out of my clearcoats in the past.

So yeah- might as well do it right.
Someone wanna come help me build a paint booth? LOL

#795 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Spraying clear over a small area is much harder to do than just clearing the whole playfield.
You need to spray all the way to an edge where the transition will not be noticed.
Rottenstone can be used to knock down the high gloss of the new clear to better match the old clear.
PPG JC660 is a very forgiving clear for the beginner to get totally pro results. Sand it before it too long, because after a few weeks, it becomes very hard.

I have a question on the subject of "spot clearing." I have a couple small wear spots over inserts that I want to waterslide decal and do a spot clear over top. The clear I would need for this would preferably be able to be purchased in very small quantities and shot through an airbrush. Any recommendations on what I should use?

#796 4 years ago

Anth - horrible idea. The clear you put down would be higher than the rest of the PF... leading to increased wear on the boarder of the new clear. At least my $0.02

#797 4 years ago
Quoted from Anth:

The clear I would need for this would preferably be able to be purchased in very small quantities and shot through an airbrush. Any recommendations on what I should use?

I don't know where you would find small quantities of 2PAC.

Maybe ask here on Pinside if anyone local can hook you up.

#798 4 years ago
Quoted from vid1900:

I'm going to walk you guys through clearcoating with just normal tools you can find anywhere. Sure I've got a bunch of high end HVLP guns, but I'm going to show you how to do it with a $12 gun and get totally pro results.

Thank goodness, and finally! Some of us have undoubtedly been waiting since this threads inception (just 8 months for me though) for this part. Everything you've outlined so far has been tremendously helpful. That hardest part is that I (we) need to lay down that thin layer of clear before any paint touch ups can be completed. So this 'last' step is really one of the first to be done, before so many of your other helpful steps can be applied. I'm glad you've carved out some time to get this important and sort of scary process outlined for the rest of us. I cannot wait to see the rest of the clear coat process. Thanks Vid!

#799 4 years ago

Yeah, I've been working on the road, so although I can do playfield touch ups and circuit boards in my hotel room, I can't really do 2PAC.

I did finally get a few days to do some clearing - lots more pics and details soon.

#800 4 years ago
Quoted from Superchicken:

OK. It's odd that 3M never says that in their product information. I guess you have to dig through the mind numbing NIOSH approvals to find what's covered or rely on the reseller. But still, after buying a full face respirator, changing the cartridges 5 or 6 times, a supplied fresh air respirator is the same money. Besides, it's nice and cozy inside the tent.

I did some research on this tonight and learned this: Hexamethylene diisocyanate, the specific chemical in two part auto clear, is listed. The cartridges Vid linked are the correct ones. I also tried estimating the service life of said cartridges using 3M's service life calculating software. The best I could come up with is about 100 hours for doing light duty clear coating under normal weather conditions. There is an expiration date on the cartridges but for the DIYer the half face respirator still looks like the cheaper/convenient way to go.

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