(Topic ID: 33446)

Vid's Guide to Ultimate Playfield Restoration

By vid1900

8 years ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 7,558 posts
  • 710 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 12 hours ago by sethbenjamin
  • Topic is favorited by 1,721 Pinsiders
  • Topic is sticky in its sub-forum

You

Linked Games

Topic Gallery

View topic image gallery

IMG_3181 (resized).jpeg
IMG_3178 (resized).jpeg
IMG_3179 (resized).jpeg
38UT58_AS01 (resized).jpg
PXL_20210727_172052905 (resized).jpg
PXL_20210727_172030969 (resized).jpg
124210.0 (resized).jpg
Pilot Hole (resized).jpg
Broken Post Screw 03 (resized).jpg
playfield (resized).JPG
95a51c8d-f958-48bb-bdd1-74e33567cd1e.aa2a8073088586be3f5da438dbfa2a79 (resized).jpeg
3d201354329bc2046139c2f91c99e8f284414216 (resized).jpg
PXL_20210715_183112653 (resized).jpg
PXL_20210715_183057643 (resized).jpg
PXL_20210715_183042127 (resized).jpg
PXL_20210715_171213037 (resized).jpg

Topic index (key posts)

143 key posts have been marked in this topic, showing the first 10 items. (Show topic index)

There are 7558 posts in this topic. You are on page 151 of 152.
#7501 19 days ago

Thanks vid1900
Another question, I have been trying to find this in the thread but I have been unsuccessful.

I found the post with the recommended gear needed for clear coating: mask, goggles, etc, but there was no mention of ventilation which I presume is a big issue, when doing this at home.
The obvious solution would be to wear a mask and doing this in the garage but I was wondering if anybody has attempted to set up a booth somewhere in the house and spray during the cold month in the warmth of my home shop.

I was thinking of setting up a booth in my basement, and enclose it with plastic, but I am sure the fumes will find a way to escape and the last thing I want is clear traveling in my HVAC...
We are only spraying a small playfield so I am wondering if I could get away by doing this in a very enclose area (as tight as possible with plastic tarps, plastic sheet, etc) and just get it done...Should I be expecting a lot of overspray to escape this paint booth if no ventilation fan is used?

#7502 19 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

The obvious solution would be to wear a mask and doing this in the garage but I was wondering if anybody has attempted to set up a booth somewhere in the house and spray during the cold month in the warmth of my home shop.

There was a guy that sprayed it in his **completely taped off basement** and his house stunk for weeks, so I would not try that in my house.

With the rising global temperatures, I'm sure winter will soon be 6 weeks for most of us.

#7503 19 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

Could you please share a photo of the can and or brand name?

Rapid-tac rapid adhesive remover.

amazon.com link »

#7504 19 days ago

thank you vid1900 and pinballinreno.

Asking because I just got this game (pic attached) and it has 2 PFs and the one in the game now is covered in mylar, and one insert is chipped (see in in the pic, green in color).

I am planning on swapping the PFs as the other one is a NOS never used and I am hoping to repair this and eventually use on a different Indy.
If I understand correctly the best approach to fix this chip is by filling it up with clear and then level sand, then reclear...

The other thing that I will need to do is remove all the mylar that someone decided to put on pretty much EVERYWHERE on the PF, everything is covered with pieces of mylar. I am not sure how these will fair but I am hoping that nothing will be pulled off when removing it.

Any thoughts?
Thanks in advance, this thread is amazing can't thank you enough for all the information I have been gathering.

876caf5d0f31f0525b336faf6d38ad57b66c8c9d (resized).jpg
#7505 19 days ago

To echo pinballinreno, this Rapid Remover appears to be legitimate. I had a System 11 that I took the mylar off of and it left all of the glue on the playfield. No amount of alcohol and flour was getting that stuff off. Goo Gone more like Goo Yawn. I rubbed some of my fingerprints off trying to get that glue off that playfield.

Based on pinballinreno 's recommendation I picked this stuff and it just WORKS.

PXL_20210714_014701435 (resized).jpg

For the Rapid Remover test in an inconspicuous spot, and when you feel comfortable, spray a section, wait 60 seconds, and use a plastic razor blade or decal scraper and get the glue off. It doesn't come off in sheets, but it does ball up like... well wet glue.

I used the Rapid Prep as a pre-clear before naphtha, compressor airing, and tack clothing before 2pac clearing. No fisheyes and the 2pac laid great, so it *seems* safe. I don't know if Rapid Prep is overkill or not but I cannot say enough about Rapid Remover.

#7506 18 days ago
Quoted from alexmogil:

To echo pinballinreno, this Rapid Remover appears to be legitimate. I had a System 11 that I took the mylar off of and it left all of the glue on the playfield. No amount of alcohol and flour was getting that stuff off. Goo Gone more like Goo Yawn. I rubbed some of my fingerprints off trying to get that glue off that playfield.
Based on pinballinreno 's recommendation I picked this stuff and it just WORKS.
[quoted image]
For the Rapid Remover test in an inconspicuous spot, and when you feel comfortable, spray a section, wait 60 seconds, and use a plastic razor blade or decal scraper and get the glue off. It doesn't come off in sheets, but it does ball up like... well wet glue.
I used the Rapid Prep as a pre-clear before naphtha, compressor airing, and tack clothing before 2pac clearing. No fisheyes and the 2pac laid great, so it *seems* safe. I don't know if Rapid Prep is overkill or not but I cannot say enough about Rapid Remover.

Rapid prep is fish eye insurance and a wax/silicone remover.

Its not overkill at all, it removes invisible chemicals that ruin clear coat.

It's more effective than naptha, wont harm most paints, rubber or plastics.

And its not toxic, environmentally safe.

Body shops use a lot of it.

Eastwood swears by it.

Rapid remover is the finest glue remover for modern high performance adhesives.

It was designed to remove decades old, sun baked adhesives without damaging the surface.

It works where all other systems fail.

As always, test things before using.

#7507 18 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

thank you vid1900 and pinballinreno.
Asking because I just got this game (pic attached) and it has 2 PFs and the one in the game now is covered in mylar, and one insert is chipped (see in in the pic, green in color).
I am planning on swapping the PFs as the other one is a NOS never used and I am hoping to repair this and eventually use on a different Indy.
If I understand correctly the best approach to fix this chip is by filling it up with clear and then level sand, then reclear...
The other thing that I will need to do is remove all the mylar that someone decided to put on pretty much EVERYWHERE on the PF, everything is covered with pieces of mylar. I am not sure how these will fair but I am hoping that nothing will be pulled off when removing it.
Any thoughts?

//<![CDATA[
window.__mirage2 = {petok:"4a173324a6e2c56d48462c26424b22c1dc2d2d20-1626279293-1800"};
//]]>

Thanks in advance, this thread is amazing can't thank you enough for all the information I have been gathering.[quoted image]

Freeze spray and a plastic razor blade will remove all the mylar.

The key is to never pull on the mylar.

Let it klink off with gentle pressure.

When the temperature is correct the mylar will seperate from its glue with very little pressure.

Patience is the key.

Glue is removed quickly and easily with rapid remover and a naptha wipe down.

Freeze spray, rapid remover, rapid prep and naptha is all I use to prep for clear coating.

#7508 18 days ago

I have frozen factory mylar to remove it off a high speed. ( it was applied after the game was played. In those days the mylar shipped with the machine separately)
I have used a heat gun to remove aftermarket mylar from 6 million dollar man.
I do not think there is a hard rule one way or the other but i would start with the freeze method if it were me.

#7509 18 days ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

I have frozen factory mylar to remove it off a high speed. ( it was applied after the game was played. In those days the mylar shipped with the machine separately)
I have used a heat gun to remove aftermarket mylar from 6 million dollar man.
I do not think there is a hard rule one way or the other but i would start with the freeze method if it were me.

Freeze spray is the best first choice.

Heat works, but is way more dangerous and can lift inserts and artwork.

I prefer the freeze spray now.

#7510 18 days ago
Quoted from pinballinreno:

Freeze spray is the best first choice.
Heat works, but is way more dangerous and can lift inserts and artwork.
I prefer the freeze spray now.

I believe Freeze spray is canned air, is not it?

#7511 18 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

thank you vid1900 and pinballinreno.
Asking because I just got this game (pic attached) and it has 2 PFs and the one in the game now is covered in mylar, and one insert is chipped (see in in the pic, green in color).
I am planning on swapping the PFs as the other one is a NOS never used and I am hoping to repair this and eventually use on a different Indy.
If I understand correctly the best approach to fix this chip is by filling it up with clear and then level sand, then reclear...
The other thing that I will need to do is remove all the mylar that someone decided to put on pretty much EVERYWHERE on the PF, everything is covered with pieces of mylar. I am not sure how these will fair but I am hoping that nothing will be pulled off when removing it.
Any thoughts?
Thanks in advance, this thread is amazing can't thank you enough for all the information I have been gathering.[quoted image]

any thoughts on repairing this chipped insert? just filling it with clear and sand, reclear... ?
anything else?

#7512 18 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

any thoughts on repairing this chipped insert? just filling it with clear and sand, reclear... ?
anything else?

The new clear will be "crystal clear" compared to the old cloudy clear.

So you probably want to carefully scrape all the cloudy clear off the center of that insert, leaving the black keyline (so it does not look like half&half)

The insert being **all crystal clear** is much less conspicuous than half clear - half cloudy

If that was a $$$$$ restoration, you would then put a thin piece of rice-paper over the insert to give the entire thing the same cloudiness.

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration/page/18#post-1739794

#7513 18 days ago
Quoted from vid1900:

The new clear will be "crystal clear" compared to the old cloudy clear.
So you probably want to carefully scrape all the cloudy clear off the center of that insert, leaving the black keyline (so it does not look like half&half)
The insert being **all crystal clear** is much less conspicuous than half clear - half cloudy
If that was a $$$$$ restoration, you would then put a thin piece of rice-paper over the insert to give the entire thing the same cloudiness.
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration/page/18#post-1739794

I saw this post earlier in the thread and was curious about this process, you had responded to me with how the chisel is used I am still not sure if what I am seeing if what I am supposed to see but I think you make just scrape the perimeter of the insert with the chisel... This is scary to me as I feel if will leave a very uneven surface full of craters.

I am not arguing with your process, I am just not sure I am ballsy enough to try it on this particular PF because other than this little chip, the rest of the PF is in really good condition and would hate to ruin this insert, especially it being so close to the player.

So I was hoping for a less risky approach, please correct me if I am off here:

I am planning on clear coating the whole PF anyways, so these are the steps I was thinking...

Sand the Insert lightly to get some tooth, including where the crack is
fill the whole/crack with syringe, make a little clear 'dome'.
Give it day to dry, then, level sand.
Clear the entire PF

Would that work?

#7514 18 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

This is scary to me as I feel if will leave a very uneven surface full of craters.

If the chisel is sharp, it's a very controlled process. Especially if you score around the keyline with an xacto blade, removing any chance of the clear taking the keyline with it.

Any craters or scratches just fill in with clear anyway.

Xacto sells #17 and #18 chisel blades, if you don't own a good, sharpenable chisel.

Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

I am planning on clear coating the whole PF anyways, so these are the steps I was thinking...

Sand the Insert lightly to get some tooth, including where the crack is
fill the whole/crack with syringe, make a little clear 'dome'.
Give it day to dry, then, level sand.
Clear the entire PF

Would that work?

Sure.

I'd add that any flaky clear that occurs during mylar removal on the insert, should be removed before filling.

X--ACTO-X218-heavy-weight-chiseling-knife-blades-5pc-2015-main__37941.1597957058 (resized).jpg
#7515 18 days ago

Just use freon to freeze the mylar.

#7516 18 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

I am not arguing with your process, I am just not sure I am ballsy enough to try it on this particular PF because other than this little chip, the rest of the PF is in really good condition and would hate to ruin this insert, especially it being so close to the player.

I can vouch for Vid's advice (not that his advice needs vouching for, lol) about using a chisel this way - a couple years ago I did a ST:TNG playfield restoration which had the same kind of clearcoat chipping as this, and just this winter I restored an Indiana Jones which also had this problem. In both cases I used a 1/2" chisel (with a good edge honed first), and it works very well - very controlled, as Vid mentioned. I can see where this would seem scary at first - you're being told "take a sharp thing and scrape the playfield with it" after all. But it's going to give you a much nicer result to get all that flaking clear removed first. You might scratch the surface of the insert a little bit as part of the process, but don't worry too much if you do. You can lightly sand the insert to minimize the scratch, and once the clear is on, surface imperfections like that will become far less noticeable. One thing to bear in mind is that you will want to fill in the insert with an eye dropper, so that you don't have a low spot on the scraped area. I sprayed, droppered, sanded and sprayed again. (I don't think anyone else mentioned this so far, but I also did a light scuff sanding on the whole playfield before shooting any clear, to promote better bonding. Also, on pinballinreno 's advice, I have been using adhesion promoter spray on the playfield before clearing - the most important places being bare inserts, but it's quick and easy to just shoot the whole playfield with it.

To echo what has already been said about mylar - I removed the mylar on the IJ and STTNG games I worked on using canned air (the so-called "freeze spray") and it really does work well. A hemostat is your friend if you don't want to freeze your fingertips as part of the process. Go slow and just encourage the mylar; if you're pulling it means you're being too conservative with the spray. I got a little bit too far ahead of the freeze at one point and lost some clear on the "Buried Treasure" insert, which meant having to scrape it and re-apply the lettering - not sure if that was my fault or if that clear would have separated anyway, given the same problem was presenting elsewhere on the playfield, but my advice as others have said is go slow, don't spare the freeze spray, and don't be too hard on yourself if you lose some clear on other inserts. All these things are pretty minor inconveniences and very fixable.

#7517 18 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

I was thinking of setting up a booth in my basement, and enclose it with plastic, but I am sure the fumes will find a way to escape and the last thing I want is clear traveling in my HVAC...

I have been planning a spray booth for a while now. I've been consulting with the guy who has to date done much of my spraying for me, at a local cabinet shop. They've got a fancy booth, and much of the time I am content to let him handle this stuff *for* me, but much is contingent upon how busy things are in their shop, and when it comes to doing things like cabinet stencils, I don't want to ask that of the guy. Too much labor, and it needs to be *my work* in the end. Despite the fact that he's been great about shooting clear coat for me, there are times when it would be great to just shoot a layer and come back to it the next morning or whatever.

I'm planning to use a 12" explosion proof in line exhaust fan, which can then be ducted through a 14" stud bay without having to re-frame anything in the wall. 12" duct pipe will allow relatively unimpeded airflow (you want to keep bends in the ducting to a minimum.) I will be building a filter wall which the fan opening will be behind.

I have spent a *lot* of time pondering over how best to do it; then I found this guy on YouTube who built one super simply and dirt cheap. I'm not going to make something as flimsy as he did - I need it to last, after all, and be able to take some knocks. But the general idea is basically sound (though I could have told him right up front that a 4" air duct wasn't gonna cut it, lol.)
Anyhow, this is worth a look if you're pondering on a DIY spray booth:

#7518 18 days ago

Rattle can spray paint is one thing. I spray in my attached garage all the time.
I would not personally feel comfortable spraying 2PAC inside my garage and i have 3/4 hp exhaust fan with make up air.

#7519 18 days ago

Am I crazy? didn't somebody make a WORD file with all of VID's posts from this thread...
This thread is so good but it is hard to navigate from within the forum, if somebody can guide me towards the .DOC that I think I saw someone talking about, I will be very thankful.
thanks!

#7520 18 days ago
Quoted from sethbenjamin:

I have been planning a spray booth for a while now. I've been consulting with the guy who has to date done much of my spraying for me, at a local cabinet shop. They've got a fancy booth, and much of the time I am content to let him handle this stuff *for* me, but much is contingent upon how busy things are in their shop, and when it comes to doing things like cabinet stencils, I don't want to ask that of the guy. Too much labor, and it needs to be *my work* in the end. Despite the fact that he's been great about shooting clear coat for me, there are times when it would be great to just shoot a layer and come back to it the next morning or whatever.
I'm planning to use a 12" explosion proof in line exhaust fan, which can then be ducted through a 14" stud bay without having to re-frame anything in the wall. 12" duct pipe will allow relatively unimpeded airflow (you want to keep bends in the ducting to a minimum.) I will be building a filter wall which the fan opening will be behind.
I have spent a *lot* of time pondering over how best to do it; then I found this guy on YouTube who built one super simply and dirt cheap. I'm not going to make something as flimsy as he did - I need it to last, after all, and be able to take some knocks. But the general idea is basically sound (though I could have told him right up front that a 4" air duct wasn't gonna cut it, lol.)
Anyhow, this is worth a look if you're pondering on a DIY spray booth:

Thank you very much for these 2 last posts, very much appreciated!

#7521 17 days ago

This was a fun little nonscientific experiment. I wanted to test the color properties of different paints, especially acrylics from craft stores, just to see how they look after a clear.

PXL_20210715_171213037 (resized).jpg

From top to bottom, we have a red Createx opaque acrylic airbrush paint (brushed on), a purple Molotow acrylic marker, and three craft store acrylics, all brushed on. Also note the Sharpie writing on the right. The wood is untreated and porous.

PXL_20210715_183019433 (resized).jpg

And there it is after I ran out my 2PAC clear. The LEFT side was covered with painters tape and is not cleared, the right side is. Can you see the color differences? Also check out that Sharpie marker. WOO.

PXL_20210715_183042127 (resized).jpg

NOW can you see some color differences? It looks like the Createx and Molotow hold their color properties treated or untreated. The white loses a little brightness, the orange gets a little deeper, and the light blue turns a much darker shade.

PXL_20210715_183057643 (resized).jpg

Here is the same cleared piece yet sprayed with naphtha. The Createx and Molotow don't really change much, the three lower acrylics suddenly match their cleared colors.

PXL_20210715_183112653 (resized).jpg

Regarding the Sharpie, you can see how much that stuff runs on untreated wood, but on the left side I cleared and sanded the same wood, then wrote on it with Sharpie, Molotow, and Elmer's Acrylic markers. I then cleared it again and left it for three years. You can see the Sharpie has faded over that time, while the Molotow and Elmer's have done quite well. Here is the original the day it was 2pac'ed:

3d201354329bc2046139c2f91c99e8f284414216 (resized).jpg

#7522 13 days ago

looking for some advice here. I will be doing my own clear coating because 'reasons' and I will be following Cary Hardy's advice:

He is using a harbour freight paint gun and a small compressor. I do not need nor I am interested in owning a big ass compressor so I am looking at doing what he did, however, I am confused as to what the real requirements to run the gun are...

Does anybody know what the CFM of the compressor he is using are?

I want to buy the smallest compressor possible and the most portable one, so would be interested in using one with the same specs, but he did not say the model nor CFM it was rated for.
I just do not want to buy one that is not going to cut it...

#7523 13 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

I want to buy the smallest compressor possible and the most portable one, so would be interested in using one with the same specs, but he did not say the model nor CFM it was rated for.
I just do not want to buy one that is not going to cut it...

Not sure what the guy in your video uses, but here is what vid says on the topic:

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/vids-guide-to-ultimate-playfield-restoration/page/5#post-725962

#7524 13 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

Does anybody know what the CFM of the compressor he is using are?

That looks like a baby dewalt 6 gallon, so it does like 2 cfm on a good day

#7525 12 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

He is using a harbour freight paint gun and a small compressor. I do not need nor I am interested in owning a big ass compressor so I am looking at doing what he did, however, I am confused as to what the real requirements to run the gun are...

Does anybody know what the CFM of the compressor he is using are?

If you were going to buy the cheapest compressor on earth, like that dewalt pancake, you might as well get the 8 gallon Goodyear compressor for $70

The bigger tank will mean it will run way less while you spray.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/GOODYEAR-8-Gallon-Horizontal-Oil-Free-150-Max-Psi-Induction-Motor/195544795

(although I'd still HIGHLY recommend you get a real, oiled compressor, with a big tank)
95a51c8d-f958-48bb-bdd1-74e33567cd1e.aa2a8073088586be3f5da438dbfa2a79 (resized).jpeg

#7526 12 days ago

Hi folks,

I just acquired a beautiful LOTR LE and it's in stellar shape, but I am noticing two tiny little raised pocks on the playfield just to the right of the "DESTROY RING" lamp. Picture attached.

They are a little bit raised and you can notice by touch. I'm guessing it's from an airball? It almost feels like a plastic surface has come up a tiny bit but there is no plastic or mylar there that I can see.

Anyway, any thoughts on this? Maybe I should cut a little mylar strip to size? Or do I just accept that's the nature of the beast for a game that's 10+ years old.

Thanks for your help!

playfield (resized).JPG
#7527 12 days ago

^ If you press on them, do they flatten?

#7528 11 days ago
Quoted from vid1900:

^ If you press on them, do they flatten?

Hi there, I think they do? They are very small, kind of like tiny pockets creates by divots.

Many, many thanks for responding and for being such an incredible resource for all of us.

#7529 11 days ago

If they flatten, you can slit the bubble and inject clear, then clamp - same as the "ghosting insert repair" near the beginning of this thread.

#7530 10 days ago
Quoted from vid1900:

If they flatten, you can slit the bubble and inject clear, then clamp - same as the "ghosting insert repair" near the beginning of this thread.

I'll have a very close look and if thy flatten significantly enough to give that a go, I will definitely attempt.

Many thanks!

#7531 10 days ago

what an awesome thread this is, I have not finished all the pages yet as I have been busy with work. All that to say vid1900, thank you very much for your previous and ongoing contributions to the forum.

#7532 6 days ago

Oy - looking for help here.

Doing a Meteor playfield swap with a CPR. Starting to drill in the dimples for posts, etc. 32 of them went just fine. On the 33rd one, the post screw BROKE OFF in the damn hole behind the METEOR drop target bank. I'm using the original 42 year old post screws until my Marco order comes in, but I didn't expect them to be weak enough to break off going into the new hole. Bad assumption, I guess.

How do I get this out? I've used a screw extractor tool before, but never on anything this small. Is it even possible? What are my options?

Broken Post Screw 03 (resized).jpg
#7533 5 days ago
Quoted from Mathazar:

Oy - looking for help here.
Doing a Meteor playfield swap with a CPR. Starting to drill in the dimples for posts, etc. 32 of them went just fine. On the 33rd one, the post screw BROKE OFF in the damn hole behind the METEOR drop target bank. I'm using the original 42 year old post screws until my Marco order comes in, but I didn't expect them to be weak enough to break off going into the new hole. Bad assumption, I guess.
How do I get this out? I've used a screw extractor tool before, but never on anything this small. Is it even possible? What are my options?[quoted image]

This happens.

Its not the end of the world.

Its a 90 min fix.

Measure carefully where the screw is from the bottom of the playfield

Be exact.

Use a plug cutter from the bottom.

DO NOT CUT ALL THE WAY THRU THE TOP.

Around 1/4" deep should be enough to grab the screw with needle vise grips.

Use the smallest one that will do the job. 1/4" is good enough. Sometimes 3/8".

https://www.harborfreight.com/plug-cutter-set-4-pc-60613.html?cid=paid_google|||60613&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=&utm_content=&gclid=CjwKCAjwuvmHBhAxEiwAWAYj-JE57xoV1z0MukRiwTWaAnWzujnvK_8YbdWVTnwTtiJeYfMFYTgI2RoCSWgQAvD_BwE

Or:

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/screw-extractor-1-4

chisel out the plug and unscrew the item either down or up.

Whichever goes easiest.

Fill the hole on the bottom of the playfield with a piece of dowel. Or make a plug that fits snug.

A too big dowel chucked into drill motor and spun down to size with sandpaper works well.

Epoxy it in, sand it flush.

Drill a new hole.

Even new fasteners break.

The key is having the right pilot hole size.

Id rather strip out a hole than break off a screw.

You sould be ok.

Cover any unsightly damage on tbe top with a washer.

If there are gouges fill with epoxy and scrape off while wet for an acceptable finish.

Clean with acetone.

#7534 5 days ago
Quoted from pinballinreno:

This happens.
Its not the end of the world.
Its a 90 min fix.
Measure carefully where the screw is from the bottom of the playfield
Be exact.
Use a plug cutter from the bottom.
DO NOT CUT ALL THE WAY THRU THE TOP.
Around 1/4" deep should be enough to grab the screw with needle vise grips.
Use the smallest one that will do the job. 1/4" is good enough. Sometimes 3/8".
https://www.harborfreight.com/plug-cutter-set-4-pc-60613.html?cid=paid_google|||60613&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=&utm_content=&gclid=CjwKCAjwuvmHBhAxEiwAWAYj-JE57xoV1z0MukRiwTWaAnWzujnvK_8YbdWVTnwTtiJeYfMFYTgI2RoCSWgQAvD_BwE
chisel out the plug and unscrew the item either down or up.
Whichever goes easiest.
Fill the hole on the bottom of the playfield with a piece of dowel. Or make a plug that fits snug.
A too big dowel chucked into drill motor and spun down to size with sandpaper works well.
Epoxy it in, sand it flush.
Drill a new hole.
Even new fasteners break.
The key is having the right pilot hole size.
Id rather strip out a hole than break off a screw.
You sould be ok.
Cover any unsightly damage on tbe top with a washer.
If there are gouges fill with epoxy and scrape off while wet for an acceptable finish.
Clean with acetone.

Thank you for the clear step-by-step and the link to the tool....going to give it a try. Will report back soon on results - probably a week or so for the plug cutter to get here and for me to get up enough nerve to do it.

#7535 5 days ago
Quoted from Mathazar:

Thank you for the clear step-by-step and the link to the tool....going to give it a try. Will report back soon on results - probably a week or so for the plug cutter to get here and for me to get up enough nerve to do it.

Its not as bad as it seems.

It takes more time to set a piece of dowel than to extract the screw.

But with 5 min epoxy and about 2 hours or overnight to harden fully.

I have had seamless repairs.

The key is to not molest the topside, but to work from the bottom.

#7536 5 days ago
Quoted from pinballinreno:

Itd not as bad as it seems.
It takes more time to set a piece of dowel than to extract the screw.
But with 5 min epoxy and about 2 hours or overnight to harden fully.
I have had seamless repairs.
The key is to not molest the topside, but to work from the bottom.

As long as I've got you here....what size drill bit would you recommend for a pilot hole for a #6 post stud? I've been using a 5/64 brad tip bit. Next step up (3/32) seemed like it would be too big and maybe not leave enough wood for the #6 to bite? Are my pilot holes too small or did I just get unlucky with the broken off post stud?

#7537 5 days ago
Quoted from Mathazar:

As long as I've got you here....what size drill bit would you recommend for a pilot hole for a #6 post stud? I've been using a 5/64 brad tip bit. Next step up (3/32) seemed like it would be too big and maybe not leave enough wood for the #6 to bite? Are my pilot holes too small or did I just get unlucky with the broken off post stud?

Found this chart....is a playfield considered a hardwood or a softwood?

Pilot Hole (resized).jpg
#7538 5 days ago
Quoted from Mathazar:

Found this chart....is a playfield considered a hardwood or a softwood?[quoted image]

Hardwood, at least Baltic Birch is. The center layers of ply may or may not be hardwood but the faces are supposed to be.

#7539 5 days ago
Quoted from Mathazar:

As long as I've got you here....what size drill bit would you recommend for a pilot hole for a #6 post stud? I've been using a 5/64 brad tip bit. Next step up (3/32) seemed like it would be too big and maybe not leave enough wood for the #6 to bite? Are my pilot holes too small or did I just get unlucky with the broken off post stud?

Its hardwood. 3/32" pilot hole.

Never worry about stripping out. A piece of bamboo skewer or toothpick and titebond 3 sorts that out quickly.

#7540 5 days ago

I use the Woodcraft extractor, then tap in a 1/4" wood dowel plug, then drill the pilot hole, and re-install the post.

You don't even wait for the glue to dry, it's tight.

You can do it from topside or bottom, depending if the repair is hidden by a post or not.

Even if I did not do it myself, I find many playfields have old screw shafts stuck in them.
124210.0 (resized).jpg

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/screw-extractor-1-4

This guy is using a big 3/8", but you'll understand how it works:

#7541 5 days ago

File this under learning opportunities: When cutting my frisket my exacto dulled and started digging into the playfield, leaving scars here and there. I've painted over them but didn't fill them in ahead of time. Do I trust that these won't be visible after clear or do I redo this, sanding these areas flatter between paint coats?

PXL_20210727_172052905 (resized).jpg

PXL_20210727_172030969 (resized).jpg

#7542 5 days ago
Quoted from vid1900:

I use the Woodcraft extractor, then tap in a 1/4" wood dowel plug, then drill the pilot hole, and re-install the post.
You don't even wait for the glue to dry, it's tight.
You can do it from topside or bottom, depending if the repair is hidden by a post or not.
Even if I did not do it myself, I find many playfields have old screw shafts stuck in them.
[quoted image]
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/screw-extractor-1-4
This guy is using a big 3/8", but you'll understand how it works:

Thanks Vid!

I haven't revisited screw extraction in a long time lol.

After looking at that woodcraft extractor it got me thinking.

I remembered that luthiers often just use a roll pin with a couple nothches/burrs cut on the end that fits snug over tbe screw and run it backwards .

This would lead to very minimal wood loss and you can extract from the topside.

T&L tools makes a set but you can just put a couple teeth on a roll pin.

Unscrew-ems.

https://tltools.com/

I havent tried it but it looks very cool.

I will definitly try this the next head that pops off under the playfield.

#7543 5 days ago
Quoted from pinballinreno:

Thanks Vid!
I haven't revisited screw extraction in a long time lol.
After looking at that woodcraft extractor it got me thinking.
I remembered that luthiers often just use a roll pin with a couple nothches/burrs cut on the end that fits snug over tbe screw and run it backwards .
This would lead to very minimal wood loss and you can extract from the topside.
T&L tools makes a set but you can just put a couple teeth on a roll pin.
https://tltools.com/
I havent tried it but it looks very cool.

Nice!

I think I have a set of those, but had no idea what they were used for.

They are in a white vinyl pouch.

Now I can't wait to find them and see if that is what they are.

#7544 5 days ago
Quoted from A_Bord:

File this under learning opportunities: When cutting my frisket my exacto dulled and started digging into the playfield, leaving scars here and there. I've painted over them but didn't fill them in ahead of time. Do I trust that these won't be visible after clear or do I redo this, sanding these areas flatter between paint coats?

They will probably be invisible once you clear.

The clear diesback and shrinks, so you can even put a drop on it while you fill the inserts for cupping

#7545 5 days ago
Quoted from pinballinreno:

Thanks Vid!
I haven't revisited screw extraction in a long time lol.
After looking at that woodcraft extractor it got me thinking.
I remembered that luthiers often just use a roll pin with a couple nothches/burrs cut on the end that fits snug over tbe screw and run it backwards .
This would lead to very minimal wood loss and you can extract from the topside.
T&L tools makes a set but you can just put a couple teeth on a roll pin.
Unscrew-ems.
https://tltools.com/
I havent tried it but it looks very cool.
I will definitly try this the next head that pops off under the playfield.

Hey....that looks pretty cool. Just bought me a set and I think I'm going to try that first....seems really minimally invasive.

#7546 5 days ago

All you folks screwing those post screws into new playfields: get some screw wax! Seriously. A small amount of screw wax on the threads will make a tremendous difference in the force required to seat the post screw and prevent breakage. Like this stuff: https://www.fastcap.com/product/screw-wax

Just a dab will do - and the screw doesn't have any tendency to back out or loosen due to the wax.

#7547 5 days ago
Quoted from Mathazar:

Hey....that looks pretty cool. Just bought me a set and I think I'm going to try that first....seems really minimally invasive.

It looks like the basic set is everything you would need.

#7548 5 days ago
Quoted from vid1900:

I use the Woodcraft extractor, then tap in a 1/4" wood dowel plug, then drill the pilot hole, and re-install the post.
You don't even wait for the glue to dry, it's tight.
You can do it from topside or bottom, depending if the repair is hidden by a post or not.
Even if I did not do it myself, I find many playfields have old screw shafts stuck in them.
[quoted image]
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/screw-extractor-1-4
This guy is using a big 3/8", but you'll understand how it works:

are these going to make a hole through? so these would only work for those situation when the repair is hidden, correct?

#7549 5 days ago
Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

are these going to make a hole through? so these would only work for those situation when the repair is hidden, correct?

They make a 1/4" hole, so if you are using it from the topside, you need to make sure that the post will cover the resulting plug.

If you are using it from the bottom, then it does not really matter.

#7550 4 days ago
Quoted from vid1900:

They make a 1/4" hole, so if you are using it from the topside, you need to make sure that the post will cover the resulting plug.
If you are using it from the bottom, then it does not really matter.

so if you come from the bottom the tool does not need to go through to the other side? is it possible to make partial holes with it?
that is the part I do not understand about the process

There are 7558 posts in this topic. You are on page 151 of 152.

Hey there! Got a moment?

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside