(Topic ID: 224045)

Using female disconnect terminal connectors

By crashpad

2 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 5 posts
  • 3 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by crashpad
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

You

Linked Games

  • Taxi Williams, 1988

Topic Gallery

View topic image gallery

Taxi switch disconnect example - 4 (resized).jpg
Taxi switch disconnect example - 3 (resized).jpg
Taxi switch disconnect example - 2 (resized).jpg
Taxi switch disconnect example - 1 (resized).jpg

#1 2 years ago

Hello, I am attempting to repair a Taxi left-ramp lane switch. Instead of disassembling the ramps, etc., I removed the switch and was going to attempt to solder it in place. When working on one of the wires that had broken off the switch, the other one broke off too.

I started the process of cleaning up the contacts on the switch and was relatively successful with (what I am calling) the first connector, the one that doesn't have a diode going into it too.

The other connector with the diode I wasn't as successful removing the solder to get a clear hole to insert the wire back into and solder.

My question is this – would it be possible to use a female disconnect piece and crimp it to the wire and then insert over the connector instead of soldering?

One issue I think might pose a problem is the connector that also has a diode soldered into it; I'm not sure if this idea would work for that.

Otherwise, it seems like this would be an easier solution than monkeying with trying to solder over the playfield.

I am just taking a guess that this could be done, am new to pinball repair and would like to give it a shot if it will work.

Taxi switch disconnect example - 1 (resized).jpgTaxi switch disconnect example - 2 (resized).jpgTaxi switch disconnect example - 3 (resized).jpgTaxi switch disconnect example - 4 (resized).jpg
#2 2 years ago

Many times you'll see these where one of the lugs had a connector from the factory. Pretty standard in some eras. For the ones with the diode you can't do that though. Also there's no way you're going to get the diode and the wire through the one hole, so you'll have to settle for just soldering the wire on without putting it through.

#3 2 years ago

You are better off soldering everything directly to the lugs to prevent connection issues in the future. Even if there is no hole on the lug, just add solder to it until you have a small mound which you can then insert the wire into. Hold it there until it solidifies and you will have a solid connection.

#4 2 years ago
Quoted from zacaj:

Many times you'll see these where one of the lugs had a connector from the factory. Pretty standard in some eras. For the ones with the diode you can't do that though. Also there's no way you're going to get the diode and the wire through the one hole, so you'll have to settle for just soldering the wire on without putting it through.

Thanks zacaj!

#5 2 years ago
Quoted from arolden:

You are better off soldering everything directly to the lugs to prevent connection issues in the future. Even if there is no hole on the lug, just add solder to it until you have a small mound which you can then insert the wire into. Hold it there until it solidifies and you will have a solid connection.

Thanks arolden – yes, I believe that's what was done on the lug with the diode – there was a small mound of solder that the wire that broke off of was in.

Hey there! Got a moment?

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside