(Topic ID: 177465)

"Underspray" on cab stencils

By Model237

5 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 8 posts
  • 5 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by pinhead52
  • Topic is favorited by 7 Pinsiders

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#1 5 years ago

I've been playing around with various approaches to get "underspray" on my cabinet stencils (or whatever people prefer to call it).

Like this: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/webbing-of-the-day#post-3451643

I love that color fade - it adds an amazing dimension to the graphics, kind of like Japanese woodblock prints. It immediately signals an original paint job over a sticky-masked contemporary one.

How do people achieve it these days?

(and what do y'all call this "fuzzing out" of the stencil lines. I've heard "underspray", "ghosting", "fuzziness".
Is there a standard term?)

For my part, on simple graphics I've used two layers of 20-30# cardstock, tacked-sprayed together, with the bottom layer 1/4" inside the stencil line (i.e. the "understencil" is 1/4" bigger/inside the actual stencil). The bottom layer keeps the stencil off the cab surface just enough to get a fuzzy line, and 1/4" inside the line is enough to prevent a hard stop on the "fuzz", and properly supports the stencil off the surface. I use a J roller to consistently stick things down without adhering the edge.

I also tried using 1/16" mat board on another repaint, but that caused too much overspray.

I've got some more complex graphics on my next cabinet, so I'm curious if there's a way to get overspray on vinyl-cut graphics, like from a signmaker's rig. Is there a material that's easy to cut, thick enough to raise a stencil off the surface and rigid enough for a bit of overhang?

I hear the factory used metal stencils that stood off the surface just enough, but making metal stencils for a one-off repaint ain't gonna happen.

Thoughts?

#2 5 years ago

No, the reason there's overspray on original cabinets is because the stencil was a sheet of steel with a handle on it, and they worked quickly, so they'd place the stencil down, it wouldn't sit perfectly flat, and they'd spray it. It was easy for paint to get up under.

So, you need to replicate that as much as possible. Foamcore board might be a cheap way.

#3 5 years ago
Quoted from jwilson:

No, the reason there's overspray on original cabinets is because the stencil was a sheet of steel with a handle on it, and they worked quickly, so they'd place the stencil down, it wouldn't sit perfectly flat, and they'd spray it. It was easy for paint to get up under.
So, you need to replicate that as much as possible. Foamcore board might be a cheap way.

I did think about foamcore, but I've only seen 1/4" thick material, which is pretty thick and hard to cut with precision. I also don't think a vinyl cutter could handle it.

Right - "Overspray" - that's the search term I needed

I guess I'm doing what Ken already does:

Quoted from pinhead52:

I havnt found posterboard large enough so we have to tape two sheets together. And you may want to plan where the joint is if its complicated art.
And no, overspray happens pretty naturally. You'll need to weight down the posterboard. I use oversized nuts/bolts/washers along the cutouts.
You can see one of the stencils I used here
https://goo.gl/photos/GejjDpjU9MCHt8kv9
Ken

Anyway, here's my version, a hand-cut stencil with the slightly larger understencil attached.
I used cheap white card stock from the kid's section at Michaels ("posterboard"). Nothing was big enough for the whole cabinet, so I judiciously pieced things together. And as Ken said, you can flip your artwork to do the other side. Montana Gold paint makes things go quickly, no drips and the results were excellent.

IMG_2504 (resized).JPG

Top side:

IMG_2505 (resized).JPG

And the result:

IMG_2503 (resized).JPG

I like the blurred line.

#4 5 years ago

I like it! It has to have the "blurr".

#5 5 years ago

Just don't tape it to tight.

#6 5 years ago

yea, good job!

4 years later
#7 1 year ago

Someone was just asking about this, so I'm posting a pic of a previous effort with 1/16" matboard where the overspray was a too heavy (GTB SingAlong).
(In other words, having the top layer 1/16" above the surface was too high)

After spraying, I went back and wiped off some of the overspray with thinner. I prefer the 30# cardstock. The 1/16" matboard was too thick (but admittedly well suited for bandsawing a big stack of stars for a SingAlong!)

IMG_9429 (resized).JPG
#8 1 year ago
Quoted from Model237:

Someone was just asking about this, so I'm posting a pic of a previous effort with 1/16" matboard where the overspray was a too heavy (GTB SingAlong).
(In other words, having the top layer 1/16" above the surface was too high)
After spraying, I went back and wiped off some of the overspray with thinner. I prefer the 30# cardstock. The 1/16" matboard was too thick (but admittedly well suited for bandsawing a big stack of stars for a SingAlong!)
[quoted image]

Here's a KoD i did a couple of years ago, oilboard is my material. Ive done about 8 KoDs/DJs with this same stencil. The yellow I just tape off.

Nice overspray...

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