(Topic ID: 258989)

Transformer ID and Voltage Inputs?

By Playdium

1 year ago



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  • Latest reply 1 year ago by Playdium
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    Bally_1972_Fireball_Transformer_Connections.pdf (PDF preview)
    pasted_image (resized).png
    IMG_6257 (resized).jpg
    IMG_6256 (resized).jpg

    #1 1 year ago

    Looking to establish the input and output settings on this unknown transformer.
    It has 2,4,6,8,10 on top.
    And 1,5,7,9 on bottom.
    No other markings seen.

    IMG_6256 (resized).jpgIMG_6257 (resized).jpg
    #2 1 year ago

    The numbers are the same as Bally transformers. This from the Fireball schematic.

    pasted_image (resized).png
    #3 1 year ago

    Thanks I'll try that with rubber sole shoes.

    #4 1 year ago

    What's the resistance between terminals 1 & 5

    #5 1 year ago

    This may help make sense of that split primary winding - the 115V wiring diagram from the same schematic. Although there is no "3" tab on your transformer, possibly an internal connection? If internal, you should also see some resistance between terminals 1 and 7.
    Bally_1972_Fireball_Transformer_Connections.pdf

    #6 1 year ago

    I measured the resistance of the lugs as follows.
    1-5, 1-7, 1-9 are all open.
    1-2, 1-4 are shorted.
    1-6, 1-8, 1-10 are all open.

    5-7, 5-9, 5-2, 5-4 are all open.
    5-6 is shorted.
    5-8, 5-10 are open.

    7-9, 7-2, 7-4, 7-6 are all open.
    7-8 is shorted.
    7-10 is open.

    9-2, 9-4, 9-6, 9-8 are all open.
    9-10 is shorted.

    By looking at the schematic from DaMoib, shouldn't I see a short between 1+5/7?

    #7 1 year ago

    I don't think the image applies to this transformer due to the fact that 5 and 7 are not linked.

    #8 1 year ago
    Quoted from HowardR:

    What's the resistance between terminals 1 & 5

    open

    #9 1 year ago

    When you say "short", you are reading 0.0 ohms?

    The schematic I included states that the *operator* needs to short the 1,3 and 5,7 terminals for 115V operation, 220V operation requires an entirely different wiring arrangement - shorting 3,5.

    The fact that there is no terminal 3 on this transformer... you're right, this is looking like it is not the Bally transformer we are attempting to match it to.

    The hunt goes on! Where did the transformer in question come from? Definitely a pinball machine?

    #10 1 year ago
    Quoted from DaMoib:

    When you say "short", you are reading 0.0 ohms?
    The schematic I included states that the *operator* needs to short the 1,3 and 5,7 terminals for 115V operation, 220V operation requires an entirely different wiring arrangement - shorting 3,5.
    The fact that there is no terminal 3 on this transformer... you're right, this is looking like it is not the Bally transformer we are attempting to match it to.
    The hunt goes on! Where did the transformer in question come from? Definitely a pinball machine?

    Yes, short equals 0 ohms. This could be an early arcade machine, not necessarily a pinball machine. Unknown application...

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