(Topic ID: 279547)

Total knee replacement advise

By KornFreak28

1 year ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 77 posts
  • 32 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 6 months ago by KornFreak28
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

You

Topic Gallery

View topic image gallery

robocop-approves (resized).jpg

There are 77 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.
#51 6 months ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:

Did any of you (that have had a TKR) experience any issues or complications after surgery?

Had my left knee replaced at age 69, three years ago. Was not aggressive enough in post operative PT to prevent scar tissue from “locking up” all the good work done by the surgeon. Back under sedation six weeks later for a “manipulation”. Suffice it to say the quality and intensity of post op PT is critical to full recovery. Now 72 and have 90% mobility and strength on the left side. Only thing I no longer do is downhill skiing.

#52 6 months ago

I'm booked in for 1 in just over a weeks time. ACL done at 27, I'm 53 now. Been bone on bone for over 10yrs, my ACL went again about 4yrs ago. My Dr said it's about as bad as it gets so out with the old and in with the new.

#53 6 months ago
Quoted from vid1900:

Get it as soon as you can.
The sooner you get it done, the sooner you are done with the pain.
Absolutely no advantage in waiting.

I’ve been told by several Doctors that “I’m too young at 42” and it would be best to “Wait till you are 50 at a minimum” because the artificial knees only last between 10-15 years. Getting it done now would probably mean another replacement by 55 or so and the second one is always way more difficult.

There are other risk factors such as getting an infection, blood clots, and implant rejection among others that come into play. An infection is the worst since that means getting the implants out to clean them which makes the whole thing even more complicated becaue the body’s immune system cannot fight an infection that has set up shop inside an artificial knee.

Debating between delaying it out as much as possible or getting it done now and have a better quality of life. Did you have one done?

Welcome back to Pinside btw!

#54 6 months ago
Quoted from Filimurz:

Had my left knee replaced at age 69, three years ago. Was not aggressive enough in post operative PT to prevent scar tissue from “locking up” all the good work done by the surgeon. Back under sedation six weeks later for a “manipulation”. Suffice it to say the quality and intensity of post op PT is critical to full recovery. Now 72 and have 90% mobility and strength on the left side. Only thing I no longer do is downhill skiing.

That’s great to hear! Any infections or blood clots after surgery?

#55 6 months ago
Quoted from sparkup:

I'm booked in for 1 in just over a weeks time. ACL done at 27, I'm 53 now. Been bone on bone for over 10yrs, my ACL went again about 4yrs ago. My Dr said it's about as bad as it gets so out with the old and in with the new.

Wow! I’m bone on bone as well. Been like this for about a year now. So you lasted 10 years with severe OA and bone on bone? What made you get the surgery after waiting for so long? Did you have gel shots along the way? Did you get a total knee replacement?

#56 6 months ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:

That’s great to hear! Any infections or blod clots after surgery?

None. This was done by a reputable orthopedic surgeon who teaches other docs to perform the procedure. And I’ve been totally pain free for at least two years.

#57 6 months ago
Quoted from Filimurz:

None. This was done by a reputable orthopedic surgeon who teaches other docs to perform the procedure. And I’ve been totally pain free for at least two years.

Glad to hear that! Sent you a PM

#58 6 months ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:

Wow! I’m bone on bone as well. Been like this for about a year now. So you lasted 10 years with severe OA and bone on bone? What made you get the surgery after waiting for so long? Did you have gel shots along the way? Did you get a total knee replacement?

Yep, bone on bone, no gel shots and I kept up an active lifestyle until recently which made me motivated to get the TKR to return to being active.

#59 6 months ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:Did you have one done?

A few months before the pandemic, I drove a friend from church to be admitted for surgery.

He's a plumber, and in his 40s. Because he is young, they did both knees at once, and made him an inch taller (not kidding).

The paperwork he got from the hospital said that there was a 10% chance of needing a second replacement, if he lived another 20 years.

The data was all from replacements done way back in the 90s, so obviously the current knees are better made than those antiques.

-

So with the new technology of current knees, probably less than a 10% chance of needing another replacement seems like great odds to be pain free.

Even if it was 20%, I'd take those odds, lol

#60 6 months ago
Quoted from vid1900:

I drove a friend from church to be admitted for surgery.

Quoted from vid1900:

Because he is young, they did both knees at once, and made him an inch taller (not kidding)

I think the more surprising piece of information is that The Tall Man goes to church.

#61 6 months ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:

I’ve been told by several Doctors that “I’m too young at 42”

I would say get it done (as soon as the pandemic is over, because... hospital). The downsides are that you may need another surgery in 15 years, but in 15 years they will be even better at it. Life is too short to live in pain, and the pain of not walking or having problems walking isn't worth it. Everyone I know that does something like this is always saying "I wish I hadn't waited that long".

And as someone else said above, do your PT with every fiber of your being. PT is hard work, but it can absolutely improve your outcome. Knees are difficult to force yourself to get your full range of motion, but seriously it is better than living with the pain. And be happy you live in a time where they can fix this kind of thing.

#62 6 months ago
Quoted from jayhawkai:

I think the more surprising piece of information is that The Tall Man goes to church.

If the man upstairs can forgive me for all the monstrous things I've done, he'll forgive ANYBODY....

#63 6 months ago

I experienced clots because of an aggressive PT person two weeks after surgery. Still ended up being a great decision.

#64 6 months ago

My Dr told me that at night when to get up to to piss , and you question yourself if it’s worth the pain to walk to the bathroom,
you need surgery.

#65 6 months ago

No I would never get another knee replaced. Had one at 58 and retired at 58. I am never over the pain. The pain for two days after surgery is unbelievable. Stayed in hospital over night and went home in the morning. Wait until you are older. Just my two cents. Had a great surgeon and stryker knee replacement. Not everyone has a great outcome just a heads up.

#66 6 months ago
Quoted from vid1900:

A few months before the pandemic, I drove a friend from church to be admitted for surgery.
He's a plumber, and in his 40s. Because he is young, they did both knees at once, and made him an inch taller (not kidding).
The paperwork he got from the hospital said that there was a 10% chance of needing a second replacement, if he lived another 20 years.
The data was all from replacements done way back in the 90s, so obviously the current knees are better made than those antiques.
-
So with the new technology of current knees, probably less than a 10% chance of needing another replacement seems like great odds to be pain free.
Even if it was 20%, I'd take those odds, lol

Glad to hear that! Did he regain his full range of motion?

#67 6 months ago
Quoted from DaveH:

I would say get it done (as soon as the pandemic is over, because... hospital). The downsides are that you may need another surgery in 15 years, but in 15 years they will be even better at it. Life is too short to live in pain, and the pain of not walking or having problems walking isn't worth it. Everyone I know that does something like this is always saying "I wish I hadn't waited that long".
And as someone else said above, do your PT with every fiber of your being. PT is hard work, but it can absolutely improve your outcome. Knees are difficult to force yourself to get your full range of motion, but seriously it is better than living with the pain. And be happy you live in a time where they can fix this kind of thing.

I happen to agree with you. It’s just hard to take the plunge when you have a family to support still just because of the possibility that the surgery could go sideways. Will have to do it sooner or later though. Thanks!

#68 6 months ago
Quoted from Banker:

My Dr told me that at night when to get up to to piss , and you question yourself if it’s worth the pain to walk to the bathroom,
you need surgery.

Pretty much what most Doctors have told me. Glad the surgery went well for you!

#69 6 months ago
Quoted from rickeve:

No I would never get another knee replaced. Had one at 58 and retired at 58. I am never over the pain. The pain for two days after surgery is unbelievable. Stayed in hospital over night and went home in the morning. Wait until you are older. Just my two cents. Had a great surgeon and stryker knee replacement. Not everyone has a great outcome just a heads up.

So the knee replacement put you out of work? Damn that sucks! You have pain still?

#70 6 months ago

I have given the anesthesia for many, many total knee arthroplasties. The age spectrum goes from forty to ninety. The younger patients tend to be individuals with prior knee injuries and subsequent surgeris that have led to severe osteoarthritis. The key question to ask yourself is are you at the point were the pain is totally impeding your lifestyle? If you are unable to perform your ADAs (activities of daily living) it may be time to consider a TKA.

Your surgeons telling you to wait as long as you can are giving you good information. They do have a finite lifespan and a TKA revision is not an easy procedure that has a whole list of problems.

Consider the "easy" stuff: lose as much weight as you can (it is amazing how this can work), get yourself on a bicycle (stationary or moving) and build up those quads as much as you can, maximize your medical therapy (non-steroidals, tylenol, the occasional narcotic if it helps). I mention cycling as it provides an excellent exercise that does not involve knee weight bearing.

At some point you will know when it is time for the surgery. Yes, it is not risk free and no doubt you are aware of the complications. That said, it is one of the most rewarding orthopedic procedures for patient satisfaction. These days it should not be hard to find an excellent lower extremity/total joint orthopod. It is it's own sub-specialty.

Expect a year of your life will be given over to rehab. Rehab (early, continuous and often) is the best determinant of success.

If you do decide for the operation make sure that they perform a spinal anesthetic. It lowers blood loss, decreases the incidence of a blood clot and often leads to less post-operative pain. I would also suggest that you look into an aggressive multimodal pain therapy approach. Your surgeon may or may not be a fan of peripheral nerve blocks. In the right hands they will certainly diminish the very acute postop pain. Knees and shoulders are the worst for pain.

Good luck and keep us posted.

#71 6 months ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:

Glad to hear that! Did he regain his full range of motion?

I've been on the other side of the world, but last time we zoomed, he said he was doing great

I'll ask for specifics next time

#72 6 months ago
Quoted from reynolds531:

I have given the anesthesia for many, many total knee arthroplasties. The age spectrum goes from forty to ninety. The younger patients tend to be individuals with prior knee injuries and subsequent surgeris that have led to severe osteoarthritis. The key question to ask yourself is are you at the point were the pain is totally impeding your lifestyle? If you are unable to perform your ADAs (activities of daily living) it may be time to consider a TKA.
Your surgeons telling you to wait as long as you can are giving you good information. They do have a finite lifespan and a TKA revision is not an easy procedure that has a whole list of problems.
Consider the "easy" stuff: lose as much weight as you can (it is amazing how this can work), get yourself on a bicycle (stationary or moving) and build up those quads as much as you can, maximize your medical therapy (non-steroidals, tylenol, the occasional narcotic if it helps). I mention cycling as it provides an excellent exercise that does not involve knee weight bearing.
At some point you will know when it is time for the surgery. Yes, it is not risk free and no doubt you are aware of the complications. That said, it is one of the most rewarding orthopedic procedures for patient satisfaction. These days it should not be hard to find an excellent lower extremity/total joint orthopod. It is it's own sub-specialty.
Expect a year of your life will be given over to rehab. Rehab (early, continuous and often) is the best determinant of success.
If you do decide for the operation make sure that they perform a spinal anesthetic. It lowers blood loss, decreases the incidence of a blood clot and often leads to less post-operative pain. I would also suggest that you look into an aggressive multimodal pain therapy approach. Your surgeon may or may not be a fan of peripheral nerve blocks. In the right hands they will certainly diminish the very acute postop pain. Knees and shoulders are the worst for pain.
Good luck and keep us posted.

Thank you VERY much for this information brother!

Yes, I’m bone on bone. Yes, I’ve had 3 prior surgeries to repair all my torn ligaments, meniscus and shattered tibia (12 huge screws) The second surgery was a “clean-up” and the third was to remove the screws that held my tibia together.

Fast-forward 16 years and here we are. I saw MANY doctors (X-rays, MRI’s) during those 16 years to see if anything could be done to get better range of motion and they all said no way. But neither of them gave me or suggested a gel shot or anything to help “prolong”, if you will, the life of my knee.

Now I wonder: Had I gotten some gel shots, or perhaps some PRP done during those 16 years would I be better off today? Perhaps with a less aggressive OA? Just to think that I could have had some of these treatments makes me really angry at those Doctors.

I’m no stranger to aggressive therapy. I did 1 year of therapy non-stop during those 3 surgeries. Was out of work for a whole year too!

I just started to eat a bit less in an effort to lose 20 pounds or so. I’m not fat at 6’ 3” and 220 but losing some weight would help a lot no doubt. I work out on a regular basis and use the stationary bike and do leg raises and squats on the machine. This makes me feel a lot better.

I’m currently able to walk with some moderate pain. I use a brace that helps a lot. It supports my knee tremendously! One real issue I have is when I sit and bend my knee past a certain point. It lock into positions and the only way for me to get up is to first “unlock it” by using my other leg to push it and get it straight. Once I do that I’m OK if I limit my walking to some degree.

Thanks so much for the spinal anesthetic pointer. I’ll ask the Doc about that. Thanks!

#73 6 months ago
Quoted from vid1900:

I've been on the other side of the world, but last time we zoomed, he said he was doing great
I'll ask for specifics next time

Sounds great!

#74 6 months ago

left knee is bone on bone, got gel shots 14 months ago and still feels good most the time. I am very active including crossfit 5 days a week with heavy squats, lunges, etc... I will do the gel until it stops working.

#75 6 months ago
Quoted from woody76:

left knee is bone on bone, got gel shots 14 months ago and still feels good most the time. I am very active including crossfit 5 days a week with heavy squats, lunges, etc... I will do the gel until it stops working.

Good to hear that! Do you have advanced OA as well?

#76 6 months ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:

Good to hear that! Do you have advanced OA as well?

yes sir, I am 44.

#77 6 months ago
Quoted from woody76:

yes sir, I am 44.

We are pretty much on the same boat. I’m 42

There are 77 posts in this topic. You are on page 2 of 2.

Hey there! Got a moment?

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside