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(Topic ID: 279547)

Total knee replacement advise


By KornFreak28

5 days ago



Topic Stats

  • 47 posts
  • 25 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 day ago by KornFreak28
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

You

#1 5 days ago

Hello!

I’m looking at the very real possibility of having a total knee replacement in the near future. I had an accident 16 years ago and I have advanced osteoarthritis.

I’ve seen several doctors and the answers range from “You are too young to get a total knee replacement, come back when you are 55 (I’m 41)” to “We should start discussing getting your knee replaced in the next year or two”

My doctor has been injecting my knee with steroids and hyaluronic acid, which is basically a gel that lubricates your knee and provides support. I must admit the injections do provide pain relief.

This is a very difficult decision to say the least: Do I tough it out for another 5 years or so and then get the surgery if the injections aren’t helping me anymore? Will waiting too long cause irreversible damage that even a total knee replacement can’t fix?

This really scares the shit out of me. One doctor wants me to wait and the other one doesn’t want me to wait. I’ve had surgeries in the past but a total knee replacement is nothing to sneeze at since you depend on that doctor to do a good job so you can keep working and live a normal life.

I was hoping to get some sound advise here on Pinside about what to do. Perhaps someone out there has had a total knee replacement and could possibly provide some good advise?

Am I really “too young” to have it done? The general consensus is that it’s best to have your first total knee replacement after the age of 50 since total knee replacements last anywhere from 5 to 10 years (depending on activity level) before you need a second “revision” surgery. Can you live a normal life after a total knee replacement (ie running, kneeling, cycling, working out)?

Any help/advise is much appreciated. Thanks!

#2 5 days ago

Hi Korn, I am 66 years old and just starting to have trouble with my left knee. No trouble with the right knee yet. I am hoping to hold out until I am 70 for the surgery but I am coming close to falling way to often. This only happens within 5 minutes getting out of a chair or bed. The rest of the time I am fine as lone as I don't move to fast. The pain also goes away in about the same amount of time. I can move pinballs, mow the lawn, and preform other activities as long as I am careful. My problem are also a result of a accident. I plan on waiting. My brother in law played lots of racket ball for many years. As a result he needed to have surgery on both knee's. His racket ball day's are over but he is able to do most project around the house with no trouble or pain. He's glad he did what he did. He was 64 when he had his surgery. Good luck and God bless whichever way you go.

#3 5 days ago

I don't know.

I do hope the best for you going forward no matter what you decide.

LTG : )

#4 5 days ago

the doctor that is currently giving the injection, you trust him? what does he say?

my step-father (70yo) had his knee replaced two years ago, out of hospital in only a couple of days and had no complications
my brother (50yo) had a hip replacement and had 6 months of complications

22
#5 5 days ago

All I know is you've come to the right place for medical advice.

#7 5 days ago

One thing to consider is that recovery from surgery in general would be easier at 40 compared to 60.

Good luck!

#8 5 days ago

Can't you just send the old one in and get a rebuilt unit thus saving the core charge?

#9 5 days ago

Here's my advice... Listen to your body. I am 44 and have had knee surgeries on both knees because of advanced arthritis. I have had to have the back of my kneecap shaved on both knees, a lateral release to reposition the kneecap, and have a large part of my ACL missing from both knees from the damage of arthritis. I have zero material left in the knee joint where the cap meets the upper joint.

When I stand up both knees pop like rice krispies no less than 15 times. CBD and my hot tub have become my best friends.

I am holding out as long as I can. My doctor said if I didn't need two new knees by 50, he would be surprised. The pain is manageable right now. I am still able to get around and don't push it too hard.

Good luck with whatever you choose, but it is your choice that you will know based on your pain tolerance.

I have had co-workers that have had knee replacements, and they said it was the best thing for them after they got done with all of the PT.

#10 5 days ago

Have a near retirement close personal friend who had the VA replace both his knees about a year apart.
He's not sorry and its actually the first time in recent memory that I haven't seen him walking on a cane. I lovingly refer to him as "RoboKnees" now...

If you can afford it; I'd say do it if you can get a trust worthy Dr to give you real advice.
Sounds like the pain is a 10/10 or close ... so even a 1/2 reduction in the pain is worth while.

#11 5 days ago

Simple questions.

What level are you functional at?

Can you do everything you want?

What is you level of pain?

Can you sleep at night?

Are you on hardcore narcotics?

Things you really need to ask are related to the level of inhibition you are experiencing now. If you are doing all the things you want to do; why have surgery? If you are not, what level of inability are you willing to accept?

#12 5 days ago

My opinion
Its always a risk to gamble....but You heal better from surgery when your young.
Go for it

#13 5 days ago

As a surgeon (eyes not joints), something most people don’t realize is that surgeons when choosing for their own health will almost always take the option that doesn’t involve surgery wherever possible. Why ? Complications. Do enough surgery and eventually you will forget the 99% who did fantastic and just remember the 1% who didn’t do so well. What I tell my patients is that surgery is for when they are experiencing enough impairment in their lives that whatever risks there are are worth it. My standard line when consenting is that if I was consenting them for crossing the street I would let them know when they step off the curb they can get hit by a car and die. Is that likely to happen ? No. Could it happen ? Happens everyday somewhere. You need to be informed fully of the risks of the surgery and then you yourself, not your doctor, gets to weigh them against the benefits you hope to gain.

#14 5 days ago

Hurts like hell the first week....after that it is tolerable ....rehab physical therapy hurts like hell for about three weeks.....took me a year to fully recover...still cant run...but I can walk pretty fast......i completed 25 marathons in the last 15 years....no more the doc says....had it done last year at age 67

#15 5 days ago

I had to do my own eye surgery last week. Really thought I could use an expert in the field at the time. Turned out great and won't be suing anyone.

#16 5 days ago
Quoted from hansonrod:

Hurts like hell the first week....after that it is tolerable ....rehab physical therapy hurts like hell for about three weeks.....took me a year to fully recover...still cant run...but I can walk pretty fast......i completed 25 marathons in the last 15 years....no more the doc says....had it done last year at age 67

Thank you for your feedback! Aside from running can you do most other normal, every day activities?

#17 5 days ago
Quoted from titanpenguin:

Simple questions.
What level are you functional at?
Can you do everything you want?
What is you level of pain?
Can you sleep at night?
Are you on hardcore narcotics?
Things you really need to ask are related to the level of inhibition you are experiencing now. If you are doing all the things you want to do; why have surgery? If you are not, what level of inability are you willing to accept?

I’m starting to have trouble sitting and getting up from a chair. I’m putting all my weight on my good knee and I know that isn’t any good

#18 5 days ago
Quoted from pookycade:

As a surgeon (eyes not joints), something most people don’t realize is that surgeons when choosing for their own health will almost always take the option that doesn’t involve surgery wherever possible. Why ? Complications. Do enough surgery and eventually you will forget the 99% who did fantastic and just remember the 1% who didn’t do so well. What I tell my patients is that surgery is for when they are experiencing enough impairment in their lives that whatever risks there are are worth it. My standard line when consenting is that if I was consenting them for crossing the street I would let them know when they step off the curb they can get hit by a car and die. Is that likely to happen ? No. Could it happen ? Happens everyday somewhere. You need to be informed fully of the risks of the surgery and then you yourself, not your doctor, gets to weigh them against the benefits you hope to gain.

Very true about the 1% comment. Thank you

#19 5 days ago

I'm 41 also had my 1st ACL reconstruction at 17 on my right knee. Had my 2nd ACL reconstruction at 19 along with a couple tacks put into my meniscus on my left knee also to fix a tear. About a year later had to have that same left knee scoped. So I know all about knee pain I've dealt with it more than half my life now.

Have you ever done any kind of knee therapy? They are a lot of things I still do from I went to therapy back then. Bicycles are your friend good exercise for you knee. Also not sure what it's called when you lean against the wall like a chair, that is fantastic I do it all the time.

I've tried to go back a couple times in the last few years because of swelling. A liquid like swelling in the knee, years ago they would have drained it and you would be fine for a couple years now it's just that same thing "we got this liquid we can put in your knee that makes it feel great" or "we need to start talking about knee replacement "or the other one" you should buy our custom orthotics " in my opinion they don't know Shit!

Be careful with that stuff they put in your knee. After my second surgery they gave my Vioxx and that stuff was amazing but it seemed to good. After the one bottle and never took it again I don't like being on medication. Guess what years later there was a huge law suit because it was giving people cancer and other stuff not good. It was taken off the market.

They are doctors like every other doctor is now it seems like just trying to get the most money out of patients for as long as they can. I'm done going back for now it will take a lot of pain and loss of mobility before I go back. Luckily I still have good mobility and strength.

Don't get it wrong I had to ice my knee today not even sure what I did but it was pretty tender and sore. No biggie a little ice tonight I'll do some bike riding tomorrow morning and hopefully it's all good. I've done very well over the years being mentally strong with my knee issues, stop and rest when you have to. Stretches and exercise are key. I my mid 20's to early 30's I was even huge into bike riding and running. Did several 50-65 mile bike rides, countless 5k's up to half marathon with a few duo and triathlons in there.

I would suggest starting with a good therapy center get into a regime of things that make your knee feel better like the bike, ice, heat. Don't be scared of it there are good doctors out there you have to find one you trust.

#20 5 days ago
Quoted from Zitt:

Have a near retirement close personal friend who had the VA replace both his knees about a year apart.
He's not sorry and its actually the first time in recent memory that I haven't seen him walking on a cane. I lovingly refer to him as "RoboKnees" now...
If you can afford it; I'd say do it if you can get a trust worthy Dr to give you real advice.
Sounds like the pain is a 10/10 or close ... so even a 1/2 reduction in the pain is worth while.

Pain is about 8/10 right now. I can manage it well when I’m walking and moving around. Surprisingly it’s when I’m resting that really starts to hurt

#21 5 days ago
Quoted from BertoDRINK1:

I'm 41 also had my 1st ACL reconstruction at 17 on my right knee. Had my 2nd ACL reconstruction at 19 along with a couple tacks put into my meniscus on my left knee also to fix a tear. About a year later had to have that same left knee scoped. So I know all about knee pain I've dealt with it more than half my life now.
Have you ever done any kind of knee therapy? They are a lot of things I still do from I went to therapy back then. Bicycles are your friend good exercise for you knee. Also not sure what it's called when you lean against the wall like a chair, that is fantastic I do it all the time.
I've tried to go back a couple times in the last few years because of swelling. A liquid like swelling in the knee, years ago they would have drained it and you would be fine for a couple years now it's just that same thing "we got this liquid we can put in your knee that makes it feel great" or "we need to start talking about knee replacement "or the other one" you should buy our custom orthotics " in my opinion they don't know Shit!
Be careful with that stuff they put in your knee. After my second surgery they gave my Vioxx and that stuff was amazing but it seemed to good. After the one bottle and never took it again I don't like being on medication. Guess what years later there was a huge law suit because it was giving people cancer and other stuff not good. It was taken off the market.
They are doctors like every other doctor is now it seems like just trying to get the most money out of patients for as long as they can. I'm done going back for now it will take a lot of pain and loss of mobility before I go back. Luckily I still have good mobility and strength.
Don't get it wrong I had to ice my knee today not even sure what I did but it was pretty tender and sore. No biggie a little ice tonight I'll do some bike riding tomorrow morning and hopefully it's all good. I've done very well over the years being mentally strong with my knee issues, stop and rest when you have to. Stretches and exercise are key. I my mid 20's to early 30's I was even huge into bike riding and running. Did several 50-65 mile bike rides, countless 5k's up to half marathon with a few duo and triathlons in there.
I would suggest starting with a good therapy center get into a regime of things that make your knee feel better like the bike, ice, heat. Don't be scared of it there are good doctors out there you have to find one you trust.

That’s very sound advise and it’s been my intention for a few months now. With the pandemic, the local gyms shut down and the ones that are open only do so during the day. Problem is I’m stuck helping my daughters with online class during the day. Guess I better start thinking about buying a bicycle

#22 5 days ago
Quoted from fingersport:

Hi Korn, I am 66 years old and just starting to have trouble with my left knee. No trouble with the right knee yet. I am hoping to hold out until I am 70 for the surgery but I am coming close to falling way to often. This only happens within 5 minutes getting out of a chair or bed. The rest of the time I am fine as lone as I don't move to fast. The pain also goes away in about the same amount of time. I can move pinballs, mow the lawn, and preform other activities as long as I am careful. My problem are also a result of a accident. I plan on waiting. My brother in law played lots of racket ball for many years. As a result he needed to have surgery on both knee's. His racket ball day's are over but he is able to do most project around the house with no trouble or pain. He's glad he did what he did. He was 64 when he had his surgery. Good luck and God bless whichever way you go.

Sounds a lot like my situation only a few years younger. Thank you!

#23 5 days ago
Quoted from ralphwiggum:

Here's my advice... Listen to your body. I am 44 and have had knee surgeries on both knees because of advanced arthritis. I have had to have the back of my kneecap shaved on both knees, a lateral release to reposition the kneecap, and have a large part of my ACL missing from both knees from the damage of arthritis. I have zero material left in the knee joint where the cap meets the upper joint.
When I stand up both knees pop like rice krispies no less than 15 times. CBD and my hot tub have become my best friends.
I am holding out as long as I can. My doctor said if I didn't need two new knees by 50, he would be surprised. The pain is manageable right now. I am still able to get around and don't push it too hard.
Good luck with whatever you choose, but it is your choice that you will know based on your pain tolerance.
I have had co-workers that have had knee replacements, and they said it was the best thing for them after they got done with all of the PT.

My knee pops just the same! Thank you for the write up. Great help!

#24 5 days ago
Quoted from jayhawkai:

All I know is you've come to the right place for medical advice.

Hahaha a little humor never hurt anyone

#25 5 days ago

I once got hit in the knee by a Durango while riding my bike. Just like an NFL linebacker out for blood. Sent me flying I was given the option of $1000 cash to settle and they would never hear from me again. I have to admit, there were a few times I second guessed taking the money. I mean, how the long is this really going to take to heal on it's own?

But now, 20 years later, my knee only goes funny every once in a while.

#26 5 days ago
Quoted from o-din:

I once got hit in the knee by a Durango while riding my bike. Just like an NFL linebacker out for blood. Sent me flying I was given the option of $1000 cash to settle and they would never hear from me again. I have to admit, there were a few times I second guessed taking the money. I mean, how the long is this really going to take to heal on it's own?
But now, 20 years later, my knee only goes funny every once in a while.

20 years ago 1K was a lot tho....

#27 5 days ago

Loose weight and start the PT now .If operation required will be easier .If the resulting health benefits make life livable without the operation all the better .
Yes I should follow my advise , easier said than done .
Shane

#28 4 days ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:

20 years ago 1K was a lot tho....

Yes it was. Just didn't like the idea of going under the knife with the chance it might heal on it's own. Bumper hit the side of the knee hard and caused something inside to tear or stretch. It took a while to realize it was worse than it seemed and the check was already cashed. The sideways stability of the knee was real bad for a couple years, but slowly it got better. I can run or ride a bike or whatever.

I'm now in my late 50s and reality is it's been so far out of mind and pretty much trouble free that it took this thread to remind me of it. Now it's my shoulder that got jacked somehow about a month ago. These things do take a while to heal.

#29 4 days ago

Get a second opinion regarding the surgery. A close friend was told to put off knee replacement as long as possible, as the replacement has a ‘limited life’. The surgeon would prefer to only do a replacement once in your lifetime.

#30 4 days ago

Wow, lots to consider. I've had 3 back surgeries, 2 shoulder, 7 hand, and last year both knees replaced, one in September and the 2nd in December. 1st rehab was 3 months, 2nd was only 2 months. Best decision I ever made. I was 66 and both knees were a mess with lots of pain.

I'm at 12 months and 9 months post surgery and I have no inside the knee pain, some numbness around both knees. I'm still unable to kneel on them, but getting better. It does take 12+ months to fully feel back to normal. I can run, but would rather not. I do have some swelling around both knees, but compared to what I had pre surgery, I'm so much better off. I should have done it sooner.

As for being too young, I know people who are getting their 2nd knees after 15-20 years. My surgeon said mine should be good for 20 years. Best of luck in your decisions.

#31 4 days ago
Quoted from dwilt99:

Wow, lots to consider. I've had 3 back surgeries, 2 shoulder, 7 hand, and last year both knees replaced, one in September and the 2nd in December. 1st rehab was 3 months, 2nd was only 2 months. Best decision I ever made. I was 66 and both knees were a mess with lots of pain.
I'm at 12 months and 9 months post surgery and I have no inside the knee pain, some numbness around both knees. I'm still unable to kneel on them, but getting better. It does take 12+ months to fully feel back to normal. I can run, but would rather not. I do have some swelling around both knees, but compared to what I had pre surgery, I'm so much better off. I should have done it sooner.
As for being too young, I know people who are getting their 2nd knees after 15-20 years. My surgeon said mine should be good for 20 years. Best of luck in your decisions.

Wow! That’s a lot of surgeries! That’s probably the reason why doctor’s want People to wait until after 50. They figure that you would need a second surgery when you are in your 70’s or so

#32 4 days ago

I got a shot of Zilretta yesterday. It’s a powerful steroid for swelling and pain. On the drive back home my fingers where cramping really bad! I couldn’t control them! Turns out cramps is one of the side effects. The cramps went away after a couple of hours. Zilretta is doing a good job so far

#33 2 days ago
Quoted from KornFreak28:

Thank you for your feedback! Aside from running can you do most other normal, every day activities?

yes......virtually all activities ...still a little tender on top of knee while crawling around or other activities involving being on the knees :>

#34 2 days ago

KornFreak28, allow me to reply from my vast experience on this subject:

I was born with two clubfeet, and placed in casts when I was 1 hour old.
A few years later, I ended-up with a condition known as knock-knee. I then had steel leg braces between the ages of 4 and 6.
(Unbeknown to me until my surgeon passed away about 10 years ago, I was a "Shriner's Kid," and my orthopaedic dr. had been sent to my small town three years before I was born, to open a clinic for "crippled children"). That was a different time in America for treating pediatric ortopaedic problems.

I had my first corrective knee surgery at the ripe age of 10 - the knock-knees caused bilateral LOCKING dislocation in both kneecaps - always happening unexpectedly even when just walking down the street. My early teens were pure hell, being suddenly slammed to the ground and having to prey (one or both) kneecaps back into place so I can stand up again and tenderly find my way home. I had my FOURTH major knee rebuild at age 20 while in college, when this again cropped up in one knee.

In 2008 at the age of 41, I had a total knee replacement - I had the knee of a 98 year-old woman in a wheelchair. It was the right knee (the worst knee at the time, with 0 cartilage and full bone-on-bone osteroarthritis). My post-surgical recovery time was 8 hours long, due to the fact they had to go thru 2 sets of previous deep scar tissue inside, remove some old surgical pins, and they couldn't raise my BP up from 80/60.

My PT lasted SIX months. I was on 3,600 mg of Oxy every day for five months (WTF) just to get through the pain (again, this was 2008 protocol).

Having gone through all that it was the best decision my wife ever talked me into (afterall, I had seen this play too many times, Mrs. Lincoln). I was a much younger patient in '08 than they prefer for a TKR with many issues facing my surgeons, and afterwards my half-year in PT totally sucked too.

But I feel so much better since that replacement.
Don't deny yourself the newfound joys of living without that deep pain, and the new mobility and enjoyment in life you will find with a "new" knee.

I am sure my 2008 part will again need some upkeep in just a few years, and I fear my original left knee will sometime in the near future require its own replacement with the Hell it's been through.

However, if I can find the mental determination to go through it, you can too. And hopefully you will find a great outcome as well! Good luck and all the best. Follow the docs advice, DO the PT regimes and enjoy the pain-free days ahead.

-3
#35 2 days ago

I don’t get total knee replacement often, but when I do, I get medical advice from strangers on pinball forums. That’s how I make life changing decisions.

#36 2 days ago
Quoted from phalcon_2600:

I don’t get total knee replacement often, but when I do, I get medical advice from strangers on pinball forums. That’s how I make life changing decisions.

Thanks a**hole

#37 2 days ago
Quoted from twoplays25c:

KornFreak28, allow me to reply from my vast experience on this subject:
I was born with two clubfeet, and placed in casts when I was 1 hour old.
A few years later, I ended-up with a condition known as knock-knee. I then had steel leg braces between the ages of 4 and 6.
(Unbeknown to me until my surgeon passed away about 10 years ago, I was a "Shriner's Kid," and my orthopaedic dr. had been sent to my small town three years before I was born, to open a clinic for "crippled children"). That was a different time in America for treating pediatric ortopaedic problems.
I had my first corrective knee surgery at the ripe age of 10 - the knock-knees caused bilateral LOCKING dislocation in both kneecaps - always happening unexpectedly even when just walking down the street. My early teens were pure hell, being suddenly slammed to the ground and having to prey (one or both) kneecaps back into place so I can stand up again and tenderly find my way home. I had my FOURTH major knee rebuild at age 20 while in college, when this again cropped up in one knee.
In 2008 at the age of 41, I had a total knee replacement - I had the knee of a 98 year-old woman in a wheelchair. It was the right knee (the worst knee at the time, with 0 cartilage and full bone-on-bone osteroarthritis). My post-surgical recovery time was 8 hours long, due to the fact they had to go thru 2 sets of previous deep scar tissue inside, remove some old surgical pins, and they couldn't raise my BP up from 80/60.
My PT lasted SIX months. I was on 3,600 mg of Oxy every day for five months (WTF) just to get through the pain (again, this was 2008 protocol).
Having gone through all that it was the best decision my wife ever talked me into (afterall, I had seen this play too many times, Mrs. Lincoln). I was a much younger patient in '08 than they prefer for a TKR with many issues facing my surgeons, and afterwards my half-year in PT totally sucked too.
But I feel so much better since that replacement.
Don't deny yourself the newfound joys of living without that deep pain, and the new mobility and enjoyment in life you will find with a "new" knee.
I am sure my 2008 part will again need some upkeep in just a few years, and I fear my original left knee will sometime in the near future require its own replacement with the Hell it's been through.
However, if I can find the mental determination to go through it, you can too. And hopefully you will find a great outcome as well! Good luck and all the best. Follow the docs advice, DO the PT regimes and enjoy the pain-free days ahead.

Thanks so much for the valuable information! Sounds very much like the situation I’m in. Glad to hear you are doing better after your TKR! Much appreciated!

#38 2 days ago

I think it is important to discuss this in a pinball forum, we as players stand for hours in front of these pinball games and I for one want to be comfortable and pain free and enjoy the game and play it as well as I can. There are older players on here. I don't want to have to sit on a chair and play either.

I was taking Vioxx and it was great for my knee pain, could dance and all while taking it. Vioxx was discontinued because evidence showed it was strongly linked to causing strokes and heart attacks. Supply was stopped and the drug banned real quick, there was another similar drug pill joint treatment also discontinued over this.
Its seems like, as soon as a good drug happens, the government stops it.

I have a similar osteoarthritic knee problem I need to have sorted eventually, in respect to getting my knee joint repaired. Its almost too far gone. I am told I am too young for the replacement because it would need to be redone in 15-20 years, the other issue is over time, treatments get better and having the original knee bone in place still is preferred to get such treatments. Likely too that metal type replacements wear time could be extended by better engineering and build. We can send men to the moon...as they say.

I think getting the replacement younger would mean the body to could adjust to it easier, as some bone around the metal parts still grows and repairs, the older you get the slower the bones repair and things take.
Usually because we put uneven pressure on the 'good knee' we then put our uneven wear on our hips as well.

The promising osteoarthritic treatment is using adult stem cells and biopsy tissue cultured to grow knee cartilage in the lab on a matrix of protein shaped like your own knee joint, genetically keyed to you, then implanted (or glued in place) on to knee bone.
I am sorting of holding on for this kind of treatment to mature.

What I need to do now is loose weight by eating better foods and less crap, no carbonated fizzy drinks and exercising in water and on a push bike regularly, low impact.
Other than that and wanting to play pinball, maybe design in a chair or some support, built into the game.

#39 2 days ago

Total right knee replacement 3 years ago. Constant pain before, now , it’s great. Total recovery 9-12 months.

#40 2 days ago

I have bad knees from playing lots of competition squash in my earlier years. A surgeon some years ago suggested-put off surgery for as long as possible until the balance between function and pain becomes unbearable. Good advice I accepted and now very conscious of not overdoing anything that overloads the knees eg strenuous exercise; walking on sand. On the other hand a colleague in his 50s had both knees replaced last year and could not be happier with results. The calibre of the surgeon and their advice is critical.

#41 2 days ago

For medicinal purposes ...Somewhere within this thread that The_Dude_Abides created will likely help you :

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/cannabis-club

#42 2 days ago

I'd put it off as long as possible. But when you do decide to do it do a lot
of research on the surgeon! My dad had double knee replacement surgery
at 70. He chose a young doctor that was a neighbor who botched it.
My dad was in constant pain for the last 24 years of his life because of it
and could barely walk.

Its a common procedure these days but not every doc has the experience
to do it right. My $.02.

#43 1 day ago
Quoted from pintuck:

The promising osteoarthritic treatment is using adult stem cells and biopsy tissue cultured to grow knee cartilage in the lab on a matrix of protein shaped like your own knee joint, genetically keyed to you, then implanted (or glued in place) on to knee bone.
I am sorting of holding on for this kind of treatment to mature.

Interesting! That would be neat!

#44 1 day ago
Quoted from Banker:

Total right knee replacement 3 years ago. Constant pain before, now , it’s great. Total recovery 9-12 months.

Glad your surgery and recovery went well! What is considered 'total' recovery though? You mean like running or playing sports or just being able to do normal stuff?

#45 1 day ago

I am 671/2, I ride a stationary bike 30 min. and a stair master 10 min. use nautilus workout Equipment 4 days / week .

#46 1 day ago

Kudos to you for seeking input and doing research PRIOR to surgery. Despite a couple of no-nothing Troll comments, Pinside members fit the demographics for TKR candidates so asking for input is smart.

My approach has common threads from many of the earlier comments:

*Defer surgery as long as practical. My approach is to tough it out to the point that the pain/functionality significantly affects quality of life. At that point even if surgery results are not ideal you won't regret it because you persevered as long as practical. This is usually a difficult decision for most people.

*TKR materials have improved over time but general consensus is that knee replacement is good 15-20 years. Many dependent variables - individual activity level, weight management, genetics ,etc.

*Get recommendations for the best doctors in your area. Talk with friends and you will be able to get lots of feedback from prior patients. All doctors are NOT equal - just with any other profession there is a wide spectrum of capability and experience. There are no guarantees but you will improve your odds of a good outcome with prudent Dr research

*TKR is a very common procedure with high positive outcomes but ALL surgeries have risk and there will always be outliers that experience more difficulty than typical. Good Dr selection will improve your chances

*Before surgery lose weight, start stretching and start exercising - outdoor biking, recumbent exercise bike and ellipticals have been good for my knees with smooth motion and low impact. Remember - a strong arthritic joint is better than a weak arthritic joint

*The internet is a tool - use it to your advantage for research and good recovery techniques and pain management ideas - you have a LOT a company with knee problems.

Good Luck

#47 1 day ago
Quoted from Oscope:

Kudos to you for seeking input and doing research PRIOR to surgery. Despite a couple of no-nothing Troll comments, Pinside members fit the demographics for TKR candidates so asking for input is smart.
My approach has common threads from many of the earlier comments:
*Defer surgery as long as practical. My approach is to tough it out to the point that the pain/functionality significantly affects quality of life. At that point even if surgery results are not ideal you won't regret it because you persevered as long as practical. This is usually a difficult decision for most people.
*TKR materials have improved over time but general consensus is that knee replacement is good 15-20 years. Many dependent variables - individual activity level, weight management, genetics ,etc.
*Get recommendations for the best doctors in your area. Talk with friends and you will be able to get lots of feedback from prior patients. All doctors are NOT equal - just with any other profession there is a wide spectrum of capability and experience. There are no guarantees but you will improve your odds of a good outcome with prudent Dr research
*TKR is a very common procedure with high positive outcomes but ALL surgeries have risk and there will always be outliers that experience more difficulty than typical. Good Dr selection will improve your chances
*Before surgery lose weight, start stretching and start exercising - outdoor biking, recumbent exercise bike and ellipticals have been good for my knees with smooth motion and low impact. Remember - a strong arthritic joint is better than a weak arthritic joint
*The internet is a tool - use it to your advantage for research and good recovery techniques and pain management ideas - you have a LOT a company with knee problems.
Good Luck

100% agree with everything you said. Thanks!

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