(Topic ID: 299115)

Tips on Slapping the Machine and Saving Wrists?

By aFineMoose

61 days ago


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  • 13 posts
  • 11 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 56 days ago by DaveH
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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    #1 61 days ago

    I want to get better and win a tournament or two, and I know that I’m going to have to do some slapping of the machine to make it happen. Both my wrists are not 100%. Any tips on how I can slap the machine or alternatives that ensure (or as close as possible) I will not end up screwing my future self?

    Thanks!

    #3 61 days ago

    My experience wrist issues better to avoid whenever possible. Slow to heal . Low level pain . Easy to aggravate once impacted .
    Maybe check with a doctor or physical therapist for some type exercise regimen.

    Shane

    #4 61 days ago

    Forward nudging is more forgiving, try playing with a thigh or knee against the machine or a leg, and push your weight into it that way instead of transferring through your arms and wrists

    #5 61 days ago

    If you can do something to strengthen your wrists before you get in a slapping situation, do so; maybe those squeeze balls might help? Best to do as much as you can on the preventive front before going down that road.

    If you have vulnerability, avoid slapping as much as possible; I can vouch for the slow to heal part. Wear both padded bicycle gloves (which I always do) and for wrists specifically, wear elastic athletic tape. Limit the amount of time you play in slapping situations, too - - give your body a few days to recover in between. If you're in a tournament, don't practice between competitive games on any machine where you'll be slapping at all.

    And at the FIRST sign of trouble, STOP. The trouble will compound quickly once begun.

    If your wrists would still be at risk, just learn play the best you can without the slaps; winning a pinball trophy isn't worth screwing up your body long term.

    #6 61 days ago

    If you have wrist issues, just accept that you won't be able to do a slap save with the same oomf as someone without wrist issues. Make up for it by being a more tactical shooter that plays in control and doesn't let the ball get out of their control.

    They would cut down the potential damage to your wrists, but unfortunately are awful to play in. I tried that myself once, but I could never get a good feeling for the game because of the angle of your wrist ends up being straight.

    #7 61 days ago

    I slap pins while competing or at home.

    A lot.

    Know your limit on where it doesn’t hurt long-term and you’ll be fine.

    #8 61 days ago

    A slap save is nothing but a tiny slide save so I would try and do a slap save without taking your hands off the game. Just move the game a hair with a quick flip.

    #9 60 days ago

    I've tried slapping, just doesn't do it for me even with no pain. Oh, were talking pinball. LOL

    Actually, while maybe it would make me a better player, just haven't had slapping work for me. I nudge forward and use small slide save movements sideways which seem to work better for me. And are quieter and don't hurt.

    #10 60 days ago
    Quoted from bepositive:

    My experience wrist issues better to avoid whenever possible. Slow to heal . Low level pain . Easy to aggravate once impacted .
    Maybe check with a doctor or physical therapist for some type exercise regimen.
    Shane

    Quoted from bobmathuse:

    If you can do something to strengthen your wrists before you get in a slapping situation, do so; maybe those squeeze balls might help? Best to do as much as you can on the preventive front before going down that road.
    If you have vulnerability, avoid slapping as much as possible; I can vouch for the slow to heal part. Wear both padded bicycle gloves (which I always do) and for wrists specifically, wear elastic athletic tape. Limit the amount of time you play in slapping situations, too - - give your body a few days to recover in between. If you're in a tournament, don't practice between competitive games on any machine where you'll be slapping at all.
    And at the FIRST sign of trouble, STOP. The trouble will compound quickly once begun.
    If your wrists would still be at risk, just learn play the best you can without the slaps; winning a pinball trophy isn't worth screwing up your body long term.

    Listen to these folks.

    Shattered my wrist in a bike accident ~20 years ago, pins inserted, physical therapy, the whole 9 yards, but once a wrist is injured it just never comes back 100%. Despite never being a big nudger/shaker/slapper, it definitley reduced my participation in this hobby for years.

    I still feel it every time I play now, won't go anywhere near a slap save and constantly have other players tell me I'm too gentle. I still have to be careful not to overwork it. I'll never compete scorewise with people who go full rodeo on machines so I focus on competing with myself. I've developed a serious appreciation for machines with obnoxiously high tilt settings that really force the issue of relying on precision over percussion.

    #11 60 days ago
    Quoted from craif:

    I've developed a serious appreciation for machines with obnoxiously high tilt settings that really force the issue of relying on precision over percussion.

    ^^^ This, more than anything else, will make you a better player. I used to have my tilts 'homeowner style' (i.e. really loose or not installed at all) and thought I was King Shit at playing.... someone hosted a tournament at my house and warned me to tighten them up, which I took to mean "install the tilt bob". (haha)

    The ball times were seriously long for those better players and it helped me not at all. That was my first tournament playing experience. Since then all the tilts are ridiculously tight, and you learn to play within those parameters and get better a lot faster. I won't say I rarely tilt now, but most of them end up being rage tilts.

    Also learn the games and do not shoot things that will tend to vector towards the drains, and learn ball control with the flippers.

    Slapping the side of the machine is mostly "safe" because it's not going to move the tilt bob much if at all and will still affect the ball the way you want - but you have to have the timing of that move PERFECT. I don't think that's the skill to focus on to get better... flipper ball control would be the highest skill there, and then of course aiming.... if you can stop the ball on the flipper but can't make the shot, eh.

    Also, don't lean on your hands if you can avoid if to keep the wrist pain down.

    #12 56 days ago
    Quoted from slochar:

    ^^^ This, more than anything else, will make you a better player. I used to have my tilts 'homeowner style' (i.e. really loose or not installed at all) and thought I was King Shit at playing.... someone hosted a tournament at my house and warned me to tighten them up, which I took to mean "install the tilt bob". (haha)
    The ball times were seriously long for those better players and it helped me not at all. That was my first tournament playing experience. Since then all the tilts are ridiculously tight, and you learn to play within those parameters and get better a lot faster. I won't say I rarely tilt now, but most of them end up being rage tilts.
    Also learn the games and do not shoot things that will tend to vector towards the drains, and learn ball control with the flippers.
    Slapping the side of the machine is mostly "safe" because it's not going to move the tilt bob much if at all and will still affect the ball the way you want - but you have to have the timing of that move PERFECT. I don't think that's the skill to focus on to get better... flipper ball control would be the highest skill there, and then of course aiming.... if you can stop the ball on the flipper but can't make the shot, eh.
    Also, don't lean on your hands if you can avoid if to keep the wrist pain down.

    I am a very average player, and Slochar has it exactly right. When I watch the really good players in league where tilts are usually very tight - they hit what they aim at far more than I do. And many of my drains are off of shots that are misses of a ramp or target that bounce back down the middle or to one side and out. Have been working on flipper control and aiming and it has helped. And they do one thing I am very bad at - they study and learn rule sets so they know what to aim at, when.

    #13 56 days ago
    Quoted from slochar:

    Since then all the tilts are ridiculously tight, and you learn to play within those parameters and get better a lot faster.

    I’ve ended up on the other side of this. For years, the games in my house were setup ridiculously hard. If you weren’t on full alert, you were going to have a bad game. And even if you were, odds are you would have a bad game. Every pinball game played was at tournament level hard. Players would complain about House balls and unfair games. League nights went pretty quick, because the games were vicious.

    And then a good friend said people in league didn’t like playing my games because of it. So I relented and set up a couple games much more normal. Not full “homeowner” style, but more normal location style instead of tournament. And what I found was that I found them more fun and relaxing.

    95% of my pinball playing is not in a tournament or league. I’ll now happily sacrifice a bit of skill to have more fun most of the time.

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