(Topic ID: 221301)

Thinking about stenciling your pin?? Read this.....it might help


By timab2000

1 year ago



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#1 1 year ago

Hey everybody,

I wanted to take a couple of minutes to share my re-stenciling experience that I did on my Evel Knievel. I make no claims about being an expert on painting cabinets, this is the 3rd one I have done, and I think this one and the others have turned out pretty nice, but if you are thinking about doing it here are some tips to help you.

First, before you start spraying make sure you have everything you need close by. Stopping in the middle to find something is only going to make the paint dry more and make it harder to deal with pulling the stencil off. The problem with the paint drying and getting tacky is, as you pull the stencil off, the vinyl will start to stretch, which it is going to do anyway, but the paint will adhere and start to stretch as well. So as you pull the paint stretches and the breaks off of stencil causing it to fall back onto the cabinet and usually not where you want it. (see pictures)

You have to remember that the stencil is "one big sheet" of vinyl, not just a bunch of little easy to remove tape pieces. So as you pull the stencil off you have to deal with this large piece of vinyl as you are pulling. I have talked with Jeff at "Pinball Pimp" who make the stencils to get tips and he has been a big help. His stencil are some of the best and easiest to work with and I would highly recommend going thru him if you are thinking about doing this.

Ok so 1st picture is when I did my Star Trek. This is me pulling the protective film off to reveal the actual stencil that you would be spraying over. The trick is as you are pulling...do not pull part of the stencil off with the film. I have done this and it sucks!! It causes the vinyl to stretch or tear which in turn screws up the layout. Go slow.20180410_093529 (resized).jpg

Once the stencil is down then tape off anywhere that you do not want the paint to go and start spraying. I used Rustoleum 2X on my Star Trek and Evel Knievel but used regular Rustoleum on my Flash Gordon. (I talk about that later.)

Once the paint is down, it's time to start removing the stencil. (have a sweat towel ready, you need it. You don't want to drip sweat into your fresh paint)
I start from the back and go forward. In the 2nd picture, you can see the lines are pretty crisp and clean. That's because the paint is still wet, so it peels cleanly, but as you work further forward the paint starts to set up and gets tacky. This is not something you can do in 5 minutes.20180717_091101 (resized).jpg

As you work toward the front and you are pulling the vinyl you will see the paint starting to stretch with the stencil. As the paint breaks off from the vinyl it will fall back on to the cabinet, sometimes back into the painted area, but usually back on the the cabinet where you do not want it. (see pictures 3,4,5,) I am not sure how to avoid this from happening20180717_091129 (resized).jpg20180717_091146 (resized).jpg20180717_091251 (resized).jpg Looks bad, but I will get all the cleaned up so you won't even notice, just takes a lot of time.

If someone knows a way to avoid this I would like to know. Basically what I do to fix this is... after the paint is dried, I just go back and touch everything up. The Rustoleum 2X paint dries fairly fast, which is part of the problem. On my Flash Gordon, I used the regular Rustoleum. The reason for this was I could not get the right color in the 2X stuff. The problem with the regular is, it dries slower which is good for peeling the stencil, but it seems to be more prone to runs than the 2X. I had to re-sand my Flash cabinet 2 times due to runs in the base coat of red. So for me, I would rather do a little touch up than have to re-sand a cabinet.

Another thing that comes up as you are removing the stencil is...some of the stencil will tear as you are pulling due to the fine detail in the artwork. Again that will want to fall back into the paint and mess things up as well. So what I have learned is as I pull and start getting a large piece of vinyl in my hand is, I take a exacto knife and cut the large piece free, so I do not have so much material to deal with. But cut it down low so a long piece does not drop back into the paint.

Remember too that your hands are going to be covered in paint. I wear latex gloves. But those will be covered in paint as well so you have to be careful not to touch anything or that will make a mess too. I wish I could have taken pictures as I went along but it was just me doing this. May if I do another one I'll get someone to shot pictures as I go.

Last picture of cabinet after I was done.20180717_091156_001 (resized).jpg

Now I know someone is going to say, "Where is the speckles?" I chose not to add those. Didn't like the look. I hope this help someone out there that might be thinking about doing a repaint. I'll post pictures after I the touch up all the messy areas.

#2 1 year ago

Great post. If you do not mind, I'd like to add a couple of recipes since I just finished the repaint of a Mata Hari cabinet, using Pimball Pimp stencils.

1) Go slowly when removing the backing paper holding the stencils. As Timab very justly indicated, it is easy to forget a small detail and ruin the stencils, later on trying to fix it. I remove the backing paper very slowly, a couple of inches at a time, checking continually for pieces of stencils that could have been left stuck to the backing.

2) Paint a very light coat around your stencils. Paint horizontally as much as possible. Most of the second and third colors on classic pinballs, are dark colors and do not need a thick coat to show up. Original cabinets were painted with just a haze of spraying on less than airtight metallic stencils. The lighter the coat, the easier it will be to remove the stencils. Do not wait for the paint to dry before removing the stencils.

3) Have cutter (X-acto), scissors in your pockets, ready to be grabbed and trash-can near by. I also use a fine pliers to pick up pieces of stencils where my fingers could not fit or risk making a mess. After removing partially the stencils, make a ball with them and keep them in the palm of your hand. When panicking, just cut the stencils, and trash the piece that has been removed. Breathe and go back with your pliers, fishing for more stencils to remove.

4) When a line is not perfect or a piece of paint falls back on the edge, I use a cotton swab with Naphta. Place it very carefully near the blob. The cotton fibers will gently suck away the extra paint, leaving a perfect delineation. I saved my Mata Hari cabinet many times with that little trick, especially around the hair and face.

Pimball Pimp stencils are first class but require a lot of care to be used with success.

Yves

#3 1 year ago

Hey Arcane thanks for the added info. I'll have to try the Naptha trick when I do the back box. I use a pair of medical hemostats for carefully picking the edges that might lift off. They do tend to get gummed up with paint so I make sure they are good and clean before I start.

I like the comment on panicking. that certainly happens while trying to do do something like this. Would like to see some of your pictures.

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#4 1 year ago

Thanks for the tips

#6 1 year ago

I am puzzled as to why you guys are taking the stencils off while the paint is wet/setting? I have made my own vinyl stencils for the three cabinets I have done and I have found that keeping the paint application as light as possible and letting it fully dry before removing the stencil gave me the best results. When removing my stencils I lift a corner slowly and as parallel to the surface as practical until I reach an opening. I then slice the stencil so I can work pulling along only one edge at a time. I can see how if the paint was heavy, it would tear an edge this way so a light paint application becomes SUPER important with this technique. Maybe the vinyl Jeff uses forms more of a paint bridge, thereby necessitating wet removal? Or maybe there's some other reason (like figuring that too many customers would apply too a heavy coat of paint to allow dry removal)?

#7 1 year ago
Quoted from pinheadpierre:

I am puzzled as to why you guys are taking the stencils off while the paint is wet/setting? I have made my own vinyl stencils for the three cabinets I have done and I have found that keeping the paint application as light as possible and letting it fully dry before removing the stencil gave me the best results. When removing my stencils I lift a corner slowly and as parallel to the surface as practical until I reach an opening. I then slice the stencil so I can work pulling along only one edge at a time. I can see how if the paint was heavy, it would tear an edge this way so a light paint application becomes SUPER important with this technique. Maybe the vinyl Jeff uses forms more of a paint bridge, thereby necessitating wet removal? Or maybe there's some other reason (like figuring that too many customers would apply too a heavy coat of paint to allow dry removal)?

It's pulling up because they are putting down way too much paint

#8 1 year ago
Quoted from Marvin:

It's pulling up because they are putting down way too much paint

If you read "Pinball Pimps" instruction page he suggests not letting the paint the paint dry.

http://pinballpimpstencils.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/PINBALL%20PIMP%20Cabinet%20Stencil%20Instructions%20v2018.pdf

Just following the instructions.

#9 1 year ago

Cool thread.

I’d agree with pinheadpierre, maybe the paint is a little too thickly applied. Try doing it a little thinner and you shouldn’t get those bad edges.

Also, if the stress levels are too high, you could cut the larger stencils (ie the sides) into smaller sections, and mask off the rest of the cab.

For example, on the EK you could do the bike first, then the stripes. You just need to be precise with your layout.

It’d take longer, but it’d reduce the stress ...

rd

#10 1 year ago
Quoted from timab2000:

If you read "Pinball Pimps" instruction page he suggests not letting the paint the paint dry.
http://pinballpimpstencils.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/PINBALL%20PIMP%20Cabinet%20Stencil%20Instructions%20v2018.pdf
Just following the instructions.

I didn't say anything about letting the paint dry. If you're going to say you're following the instructions, follow the ones for the paint also. Film thickness is important. The paint instructions are higher priority than the stencil makers instructions

#11 1 year ago

I have done a lot of stencil work and paint thickness is the problem causing the stretching- that’s pretty much a guarantee.

Another trick that can stop bleed is to very lightly pre spray the edge of the stencils with a clear base coat. It seals the edges and any seepage is just clear base coat so you never see it. Then very light color. Ever look closely at an original cabinet on these era games... the color is so light is transparent. That’s actually hard to do well with a rattle can.

Looking good. The learning process never stops, I pick up tips and try them and stick with what’s for me, sounds like your doing the same! Good luck!!!

#12 1 year ago

I usually seal the stencil in with a light coat of whatever the base color is, so your bleeds are the same color as what they are bleeding into.

#13 1 year ago

jodyg Can you clarify? Are you saying lay down the first stencil and then apply a coat a the base color before adding color #1?

Thanks!

#14 1 year ago

Yes, if you have a white cabinet, put your stencil on, then spray a fine white coat before the actual color.

#15 1 year ago
Quoted from Marvin:

It's pulling up because they are putting down way too much paint

Quoted from Marvin:

I didn't say anything about letting the paint dry. If you're going to say you're following the instructions, follow the ones for the paint also. Film thickness is important. The paint instructions are higher priority than the stencil makers instructions

While I, and everyone else appreciates your input, I was actually trying to respond to the comment about letting the paint dry. I understand that you should follow that paint can instructions, however a can of paint only costs $4.00 and a set of stencils are $140. I'll do what the stencil instruction say.

As far as putting down to much paint...yeah I probably do. I like to make sure I have a nice glossy coat. I think that putting down light coats may give and uneven glossy appearance in some areas, where in some other areas may look like more of a satin finish. I never said I was an expert at this. I only posted this to get some other less experienced people an idea of what they can except. Not trying to start an argument.

#16 1 year ago
Quoted from timab2000:

I was actually trying to respond to the comment about letting the paint dry.

however a can of paint only costs $4.00 and a set of stencils are $140. I'll do what the stencil instruction say.

Then you should quote that person not me.

This will lead to bad results every time. I'm pretty sure the stencil maker is not a paint expert. You're going to look at the paint for good, not the stencils. You have to use the paint appropriately.

Don't tell "inexperienced people" blatantly poor advice. I'm not the only one who is said too much paint is the problem. You'll also get horrible ridges with over thick paint application.

Practice spraying those cheap paint cans on appropriately prepared scrap wood to learn how to use them and get good results. Get some similar vinyl to the stencils, apply that to the scrap, spray it in different ways, thick and thin coats, pull up the vinyl at different times, see what works. You'll also find out light coats will give excellent results and will look like the original art.

Doing it wrong since paint is cheaper than stencils means you'll screw up the paint job, still be out the stencils, out the paint, and have a poorly done cabinet.

#17 1 year ago

Hey Marvin sorry I quoted you and not the other person.

I am not trying to give bad advice I am just telling them of my experience. Nowhere did I say, "do it just like I did and you come out great".

If you are so much better at this let see some of your work. Put your money where your mouth is

#18 1 year ago
Quoted from timab2000:

Hey Marvin sorry I quoted you and not the other person.
I am not trying to give advice bad I am just telling them of my experience. Nowhere did I say, "do it just like I did and you come out great".
If you are so much better at this let see some of your work.

#19 1 year ago

Here are some the pictures of the same messy areas cleaned up. Still need some work but getting better

20180718_135222 (resized).jpg20180718_135312 (resized).jpg20180718_135619 (resized).jpg

#20 1 year ago

Here are two of the other games I have done.........

20180718_143012 (resized).jpg20180718_143033 (resized).jpg
#21 1 year ago
Quoted from pinheadpierre:

I am puzzled as to why you guys are taking the stencils off while the paint is wet/setting? I have made my own vinyl stencils for the three cabinets I have done and I have found that keeping the paint application as light as possible and letting it fully dry before removing the stencil gave me the best results. When removing my stencils I lift a corner slowly and as parallel to the surface as practical until I reach an opening. I then slice the stencil so I can work pulling along only one edge at a time. I can see how if the paint was heavy, it would tear an edge this way so a light paint application becomes SUPER important with this technique. Maybe the vinyl Jeff uses forms more of a paint bridge, thereby necessitating wet removal? Or maybe there's some other reason (like figuring that too many customers would apply too a heavy coat of paint to allow dry removal)?

I do agree with a lot of what you have said. I just have not found much info on this site, or any other as to the correct way, if there is one, on how to do a complete repaint. Vid has a section on cabinet repair and I looked thru a lot of that, but the I never saw anything on stenciling or cabinet painting. I think he got too busy answering all the questions it created and just did not finish.

So I am just putting it out there as to what I did, and what happened to me while doing it. If someone gets anything out of it...Great! If not, and they think I am a complete idiot, then that's fine too. As I stated... I probably do laid down to heavy of a coat and that tends to lead to a lot of touch up, which I do not mind doing. At least I'm trying.

#22 1 year ago
Quoted from timab2000:

I do agree with a lot of what you have said. I just have not found much info on this site, or any other as to the correct way, if there is one, on how to do a complete repaint. Vid has a section on cabinet repair and I looked thru a lot of that, but the I never saw anything on stenciling or cabinet painting. I think he got too busy answering all the questions it created and just did not finish.
So I am just putting it out there as to what I did, and what happened to me while doing it. If someone gets anything out of it...Great! If not, and they think I am a complete idiot, then that's fine too. As I stated... I probably do laid down to heavy of a coat and that tends to lead to a lot of touch up, which I do not mind doing. At least I'm trying.

No one called you an idiot. you did try, but look at the EK overlap areas, you have the paint so thick that you can see essentially cliffs of paint. It shoudn't look like that and it didn't out of the factory. thinner coverage will cure better, and not peel or wick under the stencils. If some does wick it will be very minimal. If you are going that thick just because you want gloss, put the paint down correctly then clear it with whatever gloss level you prefer.

#23 1 year ago
Quoted from Marvin:

No one called you an idiot. you did try, but look at the EK overlap areas, you have the paint so thick that you can see essentially cliffs of paint. It shoudn't look like that and it didn't out of the factory. thinner coverage will cure better, and not peel or wick under the stencils. If some does wick it will be very minimal. If you are going that thick just because you want gloss, put the paint down correctly then clear it with whatever gloss level you prefer.

As I stated before...let see some of your work.

#24 1 year ago

I just did my right side stencil yesterday and it’s under this sub forum called Lectronamo rebuild. I used the same rattle can paint you did and a thick abs stencil that was just laid to the cabinet. I did 4 light coats while it was horizontal and let it dry for about 15 min between coats and had no issues. Some of the edges have that original slight ghosting that made it look 100% original.

18FF2E26-FBDD-44D3-AB7A-B38E464D1526 (resized).jpeg
#25 1 year ago
Quoted from wolffcub:

I just did my right side stencil yesterday and it’s under this sub forum called Lectronamo rebuild. I used the same rattle can paint you did and a thick abs stencil that was just laid to the cabinet. I did 4 light coats while it was horizontal and let it dry for about 15 min between coats and had no issues. Some of the edges have that original slight ghosting that made it look 100% original.

This looks well done. No huge steps of paint layered on each other. nice job.

#26 1 year ago
Quoted from Marvin:

This looks well done. No huge steps of paint layered on each other. nice job.

OK considering he is standing 4-5 feet away. Lets see close up

#27 1 year ago

Ok Now I'm about the same distance away as he is. The close ups I took were about 3-4 inches away. When you stand 4-5 ft away you can't tell the difference.

And as I stated before Marvin lets see your work if your such an expert.
20180718_153237 (resized).jpg

If I would have just taken pictures of everything I did from 4-5 ft away everyone would have said looks great well done.

-1
#28 1 year ago
Quoted from timab2000:

OK considering he is standing 4-5 feet away. Lets see close up

Why are you throwing wolffcub under the bus, he did what appears to be nice work. kind of diskish behavior.

#29 1 year ago
Quoted from Marvin:

Why are you throwing wolffcub under the bus, he did what appears to be nice work. kind of diskish behavior.

I am not throwing anyone under the bus. You have done nothing but criticized the work I have done, yet when I ask to see up close pictures of his work I get nothing and when I ask you to post your re-paints of work you have done, I get nothing. All paint jobs look good far away

#30 1 year ago
Quoted from wolffcub:

I just did my right side stencil yesterday and it’s under this sub forum called Lectronamo rebuild. I used the same rattle can paint you did and a thick abs stencil that was just laid to the cabinet. I did 4 light coats while it was horizontal and let it dry for about 15 min between coats and had no issues. Some of the edges have that original slight ghosting that made it look 100% original.

I think the paint job you did looks great. Not throwing you under any bus.

#31 1 year ago

Nice job Timab2000.

I have painted a bunch of cabs using my own made stencils, auto paints which are thin, matt and need a clear afterwards. Plenty of write ups in my restoration posts. The results are good but the paint is getting way too expensive ($250-$300) per cab.

Your examples are very good and the first I have seen in this detail using these stencils and the box store spray paints. Marvin is being frank and correct in his paint thickness observations and this makes this a better thread than most actually to me.

I believe Pinhead 52 and Boilerman use the paints you use or similar with their own stencils mostly and produce excellent work. Yours with the necessary touch ups (we all have to do touch up some) looks great. We all get better at this and I appreciate your thread and ability.

Steve J.

#32 1 year ago

I am guessing that ABS stencils do not stick like vinyl? You just lift them right off??

#33 1 year ago

Thank you Stevein Texas.

#34 1 year ago

My lines are not perfectly sharp but I was just not trying to get that look anyways. its still not bad for a non stick down stencil. I paint models all the time with tape and stencils and too much paint per layer can cause bleeding, glosses seem to cause more of an issue. You cab still looks great and like you said a bit of clean up and it will be perfect.

IMG_9756 (resized).JPG
#35 1 year ago

FWIW, Gang, I have stenciled several cabinets and each one is a learning experience. I appreciate to OP's willingness to share and the those who have chimed in with additional feedback.

I always stencil with a HVLP and know that too much paint is my worst enemy...it's just so hard to know when to "stop" as I want that nice full coverage. All that said, wolffcub 's star above is right on. I wish I could get that original look of slight overspray mastered, but I fear it's almost impossible with a tacky (adhesive) stencil.

OP, There definitely is a void of material on stencil related experience - thanks for opening up the dialogue!

#36 1 year ago
Quoted from SteveinTexas:

Your examples are very good and the first I have seen in this detail using these stencils and the box store spray paints. Marvin is being frank and correct in his paint thickness observations and this makes this a better thread than most actually to me.

I appreciate Marvins frankness, and I have admitted to going to heavy on the paint, but to say I am giving blatantly poor advice is uncalled for. I not trying to give advice, only sharing my experience. If you don't like my experience... Marvin can keep his "DICKISH" comments to yourself.

Quoted from Marvin:

Don't tell "inexperienced people" blatantly poor advice. I'm not the only one who is said too much paint is the problem. You'll also get horrible ridges with over thick paint application.

#37 1 year ago
Quoted from wolffcub:

My lines are not perfectly sharp but I was just not trying to get that look anyways. its still not bad for a non stick down stencil. I paint models all the time with tape and stencils and too much paint per layer can cause bleeding, glosses seem to cause more of an issue. You cab still looks great and like you said a bit of clean up and it will be perfect.

This is also the look from the originals that used loose metal stencils. With the up close pic it looks even better. Great job.

#38 1 year ago
Quoted from wolffcub:

My lines are not perfectly sharp but I was just not trying to get that look anyways. its still not bad for a non stick down stencil. I paint models all the time with tape and stencils and too much paint per layer can cause bleeding, glosses seem to cause more of an issue. You cab still looks great and like you said a bit of clean up and it will be perfect.

Yeah that looks great. Thanks for posting that. I wasn't trying to say your job would look bad close up, I would like for my stars to look like that. But I am not sure if I can get that kind of result. I'll keep trying though..........

#39 1 year ago

Picture of back box stars. Very similar to woffclub. I do not know if you can get that look from vinyl stencils or not.

20180718_160007 (resized).jpg

#40 1 year ago

Really tight and small contact points with vinyl stencils can cause a capillary action to occur and pull back the paint. This is even worse if the surface is not glass smooth. I pefer to actually use loose stencils so that does not happen. Going off topic with non pinball pics lol.

3E424F1D-B153-4F96-BAC1-C7DF6D93CD1D (resized).jpeg7AF893D1-41D6-4F12-B6C6-FA864EFE84F4 (resized).jpeg
#41 1 year ago

You have a small airbrush timab? A little masking and a few thin coats of white primer over the bleeds and some thin coats of white would take care of it.

#42 1 year ago
Quoted from wolffcub:

You have a small airbrush timab? A little masking and a few thin coats of white primer over the bleeds and some thin coats of white would take care of it.

No I do not have an airbrush. But I am working on figuring it out. Way too heavy on the coats of paint and not being patient enough on letting it dry somewhat, before peeling.

Practice make perfect I guess. Hopefully I'll do better on the next pin I find.

#43 1 year ago

in the little bit of stenciling I've done i have figured out that flat/matte paints take a lot less thickness of coats to cover than do gloss paints and don't have near the issues peeling with the stencil nor ridges at the edges. of course the selection isn't there in the rattle-cans for matte paints nearly as much as gloss.

#44 1 year ago

Gloss is awkward as it will take longer to dry and it’s tendecy to take on your fingerprints until it cured for at least 48 hours. The hardest part it laying that first thin first coat and walk away, trying to leave when the first coat is almost not covering anything is a big mental chalange lol. Once the third coat gets applied you start to get rewarded.

#45 1 year ago
Quoted from timab2000:

No I do not have an airbrush. But I am working on figuring it out. Way too heavy on the coats of paint and not being patient enough on letting it dry somewhat, before peeling.
Practice make perfect I guess. Hopefully I'll do better on the next pin I find.

Just spray some white into a cup and use a hobby tip brush no one will ever see.

#46 1 year ago
Quoted from timab2000:

No I do not have an airbrush. But I am working on figuring it out. Way too heavy on the coats of paint and not being patient enough on letting it dry somewhat, before peeling.
Practice make perfect I guess. Hopefully I'll do better on the next pin I find.

Practice makes perfect and all that jazz. I don'r know what you know and what you don't know so I will speak as if you know very little or nothing at all.

Painting is all with the wrist. The is a right way to swing a gun/can and a wrong way to swing.

The wrong way is to grab your gun or can and lock your wrist into a hard position. Then you fan the gun like it is on a string and you get uneven coats of paint because as you swing the gun away from your front and over to the side you wind up with heavy paint in front of your body where the gun is closest to your work. As you fan from side to side the paint will have lighter coats of paint because the gun alternates from being close to your work to being far from your work.

The correct way to swing a gun is to unlock your wrist and let it flex as you move from side to side with your body. You always need to think in terms of keeping your gun parallel to your work as you move from side to side. If you are holding your gun six inches away from work, flex your wrist as you move from one side of your work to the other, keeping that six inch (or 8 inch or whatever) distance all the way from end to end.

Fanning your gun is the easiest mistake to make. Flex your wrist and work for parallel action.

May be you already know this. Maybe you don't.

Pretend you are working for the man where you have to be fast and you have to be good. Paint is expensive so you do not want to use too much and the boss will only tolerate occasional touch ups.

Some of you talk about working on the horizontal. I understand that. But if you can find some cheap paint to waste, try painting a scrap vertical surface so you can get the feel of how much paint to lay down before you starting having problems with runs, sags, and curtains. Go for the gusto and try to make it run or sag. It will be the best teacher that you will ever have. There is no feeling of "aw, shit" like when you make that last pass and all you can do is stand there as your paint starts moving for the floor.

#47 1 year ago

I just did pinbot with pimp stencils. You certainly need to hustle lifting the stencils and sometimes you need three hands when pulling up the pieces. I too put down too much paint, ended up with paint spider lines to clean up. BEST ADVICE, let it dry before attempting touch up.

All in all it came out fairly nice. Of course Im probably pushing 50 repaints. Gottlieb Wedgeheads are so mush easier.

When I want the fussy edge effect I'll use home made oil board stencils. Diamond Jack is one I did with oil board

I got to work on my webbing...

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#48 1 year ago

Man I should get into the business of laser cutting cabinet stencils from the 1/16” abs I used. Worked great because of their weight.

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#49 1 year ago
Quoted from wolffcub:

Man I should get into the business of laser cutting cabinet stencils from the 1/16” abs I used. Worked great because of their weight.

If I could get results like this and be able to use them again I would be your first customer .

#50 1 year ago
Quoted from wolffcub:

Man I should get into the business of laser cutting cabinet stencils from the 1/16” abs I used. Worked great because of their weight.

Great idea but...how many times can you continue to paint the same machine?

I think this is where the vinyl stencil has the advantage. (business wise) You only get to use it once. It can't be re-sold to someone else You get one shot and that's it. Forcing the next person who has the same machine to go out and buy one for themselves. I hope that made sense.

But yeah the results you are getting are nice! Well done!

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