(Topic ID: 155812)

Technology from the 80s


By rai

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 52 posts
  • 28 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by Richthofen
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 39 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    image (resized).jpeg
    tv front (resized).jpg
    vcr (resized).jpg
    8192282876_79cf2b6d11 (resized).jpg
    2016-06-13_14.46.07_(resized).jpg
    8629759687_30305be7ef_(resized).jpg
    1e17063ab7e0d82b47274d493370bb55_(resized).jpg
    032d1d40f06200689c4fa57159902fab_(resized).jpg
    big30_(resized).JPG
    SeenSay_(resized).jpg
    CustomPunchcard.jpg
    Media.jpg
    PunchCard.jpg
    Terminator.jpg
    ReelTape.jpg
    OpticalCassette2.jpg

    There are 52 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    #1 3 years ago

    I graduated HS in 1983 so I lived through all this.

    I still marvel at the early DOS computers I owned back well before Pentium (286 or something like that), recall phone modems of the 90s. But looking farther back to the 80s is even more astonishing what we thought was high tech.

    I wonder what technology will be like 30-40 years from now?

    http://money.cnn.com/gallery/technology/2016/03/25/80s-tech/index.html?iid=hp-stack-dom

    image_(resized).png

    #2 3 years ago

    I also graduated in 83. In 81 my high school offered it's first computer class. We had to work in groups because we didn't have enough computers to go around. I think the model was TRS-80 3. Computers were still new at that time and our teacher struggled with the new technology. I kind of remember using a mailbox program to send messages to other workstations in the classroom. To be honest I got bored of technology about 5 years and that's when I rediscovered the simplicity of pinball again.

    #3 3 years ago

    In 1981 our HS modified a larger class room to create a computer room/lab inside. 5 computer stations were set up. Think that the room even had AC. Plenty of money spent, don't recall what computers were purchased.

    #4 3 years ago

    I was a little kid in the 80s, but my family did get the original IBM PC, with dual floppy drives (no hard drive). I still have it, packed up in its original box. It may even still work. I want to set it up some day and find out -- boot up the good ol' DOS 1.0 and see if I can get King's Quest or Hitchhiker's Guide running.

    When I was about 7 years old, I began teaching myself programming by copying the programs out of the back of BYTE Magazine, and then modifying the code. Our elementary school had a very good computer program as well, where we learned LOGO, a simple programming language for drawing shapes procedurally.

    #5 3 years ago

    In 1981 I was in a customers home, he had a computer on his dinning room table. It was the size of a A/V Receiver, it had a few rows of LED 's on the front panel. He said he had to enter lines of code into it, the book he had was almost as big. He had a small monitor hooked up to it. Looking at photos on line, it must of been an Altair.

    #6 3 years ago
    Quoted from pezpunk:

    Our elementary school had a very good computer program as well, where we learned LOGO, a simple programming language for drawing shapes procedurally.

    I remember hating computers as a result of my school's computer program. Thank you gym coach, er I mean computing teacher. Got back into it in the early 90's. Thank you 486SX25 trying to run Star Wars: X-Wing.

    #7 3 years ago
    Quoted from Darcy:

    In 1981 I was in a customers home, he had a computer on his dinning room table. It was the size of a A/V Receiver, it had a few rows of LED 's on the front panel. He said he had to enter lines of code into it, the book he had was almost as big. He had a small monitor hooked up to it. Looking at photos on line, it must of been an Altair.

    could have been an Imsai 8080.

    #8 3 years ago

    Lest I forget, big shout out to QEMM. Those were the good old days.....

    qemm_(resized).JPG

    #9 3 years ago
    Quoted from mcluvin:

    Lest I forget, big shout out to QEMM. Those were the good old days.....

    qemm_(resized).JPG

    Crap why the heck do I need to partition my memory?

    good thing about standardization, I guess back then it was like the Wild West.

    One of the best games came out before Doom was called Ultima Undreworld. It was a first person RPG and had mouse look, seemed to be the test bed for a lot of games that came after. Doom might get a lot of the credit but Ultima Underworld was first.

    Might not look so hot today but 1992 this was the shit.

    image_(resized).jpeg
    image_(resized).png
    image_(resized).png

    #10 3 years ago

    I never played that, but did any of you play Myth? I don't play games anymore, but that was a good one.

    myth_(resized).JPG

    #11 3 years ago
    Quoted from mcluvin:

    I never played that, but did any of you play Myth? I don't play games anymore, but that was a good one.

    myth_(resized).JPG

    That was a good one, a RTS game iirc but I was more of a Warcraft guy.

    #12 3 years ago

    When I wasn't working on my custom C-64 BBS software I was playing Elite... circa 1986 (or thereabouts)

    c128b_(resized).jpg

    images_(resized).jpeg

    #13 3 years ago

    image_(resized).jpegimage_(resized).jpgimage_(resized).jpgimage_(resized).jpg

    #14 3 years ago

    I had a Vic-20 when I was in High School. Had a cassette TAPE drive... ooh baby!

    It had 2K.... Kilobytes of memory. At some point I bought a 4K upgrade... for $150 (That was a serious upgrade).

    When I went into college, I upgraded to a C-64 (man I miss that Ghostbusters game). I wrote so much software on that thing as well as papers... got me through college. Oh, yea... that one had a 300 baud modem....AND I LOVED IT!!! Everyone else had to use a horrid text editor (one step better than punch cards). I actually wrote one of my mainframe assembler projects using punchcards .. a few weeks before they pulled out all the punchcard equipment. That was a real end-of-the-80's moments.

    faz

    #15 3 years ago
    Quoted from pinball_faz:

    a few weeks before they pulled out all the punchcard equipment.

    That's too funny. My 1st field service job was repairing punch card equipt.

    #16 3 years ago

    I have a few punch cards as part of my "media" collection at work. The kids coming out of college are floored by it all.

    I have a four platter disk drive (one of the top mounts off a Series 1). It's 18" across 3+" high and holds only 80MB

    Most have seen a 3.5 hard floppy, but fewer have seen the 4" floppy and very few have seen the 8" floppy.
    I also have a terminator from a wired bus and tag system... before ficon.

    faz

    #17 3 years ago

    I took computer science in high school in 1973.The computer was the size of a large office desk and was programmed with long tape that you fed into it and we had to make the programs to tell the computer what to do.

    #18 3 years ago

    I was a freshman in college in 1976. I remember the keypunch cards and using an electric typewriter for English compositions. It sucked making a mistake (no spell check) and having to retype a page when you did make an error.

    Eighties technology for me was getting a Walkman and an Atari 2600. It was amazing playing Asteroids, or something similar to the arcade Asteroids, at home.

    One of the "youngsters" at work doesn't recall ever having dial up service. I didn't bother trying to explain the rotary phones we used growing up.

    #19 3 years ago

    My first real system was a System 36 back in high school. IBM Basic and Fortran.... that was 1982.

    Fall of 83 I started at NIU running on an Amdahl mainframe.

    Mid 80's I worked on an internship at the school newspaper. I ran their computer system a 286 POS that could not get out of it's own way fast enough. I purchased a new XT computer that got everyone's attention oooooh shinny. Ran the billing jobs in 1/4 the time.

    The network at the time was IBM Token ring.... oh the nightmares I had trying to configure that thing.

    The other fun thing was a Dbase-3 project created by my predecessor. Nice software at the time... but surely not in use any more.

    True story.... I started on a data project harvesting info from the US Census ... to this day they STILL publish data in DBase-3 format.... I had to giggle. I mean it works for sure, but really... DBase-3?!?!?
    faz

    #20 3 years ago

    Welltris!

    welltris_(resized).jpg

    #21 3 years ago
    Quoted from pinball_faz:

    ...but fewer have seen the 4" floppy...

    For shame.... it's a 5 1/4" floppy

    I still can vividly recall the sound of reading a floppy disk.

    #22 3 years ago

    Loved my Vic 20, came with standard 5Kb of which 1.5 Kb was used by video. The Tape drive was nearly the same price as the Vic 20, without it, the Vic 20 was not much fun. When the C64 came out, we could not see why you would need so much memory, how wrong were we….
    How about magnet core memory, this type of memory was used by NASA into the 1980’s. I read somewhere that was able to withstand impact, therefor recoverable after incidents. That’s why it was used for so long. Cool stuff, tell the kids of today and they wouldn’t believe you.

    Core_memory_plane_closer_(resized).jpg
    Core_memory_closeup_(resized).jpg

    #23 3 years ago

    I was in grade school in the 90s but we still used Macintosh IIs in computer lab in our rural Indiana school. I remember playing Oregon Trail, Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?, and a platform/board game involving Alice In Wonderland. There was also a game where you were a pizza delivery man in a top down mode. It was very fun to try and get the top score in computer class. I remember the sounds of the various sized floppys and the dot matrix printers with a big box of paper on the floor.

    By the time I was graduating High School in '02 we had Windows PCs and could surf the internet and play games like pool on Yahoo.com. The connection was still dial-up though and we still used floppys to save papers we were writing for class.

    It was a big deal when the library got a couple of iMacs around the time they came out.

    #24 3 years ago
    Quoted from Chrisbee:

    Cool stuff, tell the kids of today and they wouldn’t believe you

    If one of the Kardashians said it they might

    #25 3 years ago

    Had a Vic-20 at home also. With the tape drive and several text adventure games on cartridge. Pirate's Cove or The Count anyone?

    Also, my brother and I were such nerds that we jointly taught a summer class for junior high students on the High School's TRS-80's. Yes, our High School had Radio Shack computers. Classy.

    #26 3 years ago

    And today I play with my Arduino Mega, similar technology as the Vic 20....
    8bit processor, a bit faster and better coms, but otherwise!

    #27 3 years ago
    Quoted from Purpledrilmonkey:

    For shame.... it's a 5 1/4" floppy

    You are so correct; It's been a while since I even held one in my hand... let alone cut the slot out on the other side to get double sided storage. I was out of my office until this morning.... and wanted to include some extra fun.

    The standard is "pics or it did not happen... so". I included a marker in the shots to give some scale.

    8", 5 1/4" and a 3.5" Floppy
    FloppiesX3.jpg

    PunchCard
    PunchCard.jpg

    6150 Cassette Tape
    6150Cassette.jpg

    Bernoulli Cartridge - VERY 80's tech. This was cutting edge at the time. "Infinite Storage"
    Bernoulli_Cassette.jpg

    Mainframe B&T Terminator
    Terminator.jpg

    Standard Reel-Reel tape
    ReelTape.jpg

    After reels, the 3490E was the standard
    3490E.jpg

    This little bad-boy is an 3850 Mass Storage cartridge. Stored in a hard plastic shell, it sits in a honeycomb of cells. Once the robot gets the request, the cell is addressed, the shell is removed and the robot mounts the tape. Early 90's but still fun.
    MasstoreCassette.jpg

    MasstoreCassette2.jpg

    Boring DLT Tape
    DLTcassette.jpg

    This is my favorite. Definitely 90's tech, but it needs to go in the mix.
    This is a 7GB optical platter. That huge floppy disk design has real glass inside. We burned these onsite for long term storage. I pulled it open so you can see the platter.... it's just like a huge floppy. Heavy too.

    OpticalCassette.jpg
    OpticalCassette2.jpg

    Getting the S1 Drive out is a PITA.. but you can see it on the bottom of my media collection
    Media.jpg

    faz

    #28 3 years ago

    That's cool Faz. I have a registration gauge for that 80 col. card. I'll have to take pics. Ever hear of a 96 col. card? I have a gauge for that too!!

    #29 3 years ago

    I used to have stacks that I used as note cards. As I finally worked through them all (like 20 years worked through), I kept only 6 cards. Three 80 column and three of this custom card. I remember there were a bunch of different formats.. some even completely blank (which is freaky to see punched).

    I don't know the story behind it. They stopped using this card years before I joined Spiegel as a programmer. It looks like it was computer generated for humans to read... then feed into a sorter.

    CustomPunchcard.jpg

    faz

    #30 3 years ago

    Funny, I read this old (1950's) Sci-Fi story by Alfred Bester ('The Demolished Man').

    It is set in the far future. Flying cars and phone implanted in your head.

    Anyway the cops were doing a library search and had to do it with a punch card computer.

    #31 3 years ago

    I still marvel at some of this older technology.

    SeenSay_(resized).jpg

    #32 3 years ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    I still marvel at some of this older technology.

    The Dragon goes BAO!
    faz

    #33 3 years ago

    I didn't get to see my first computer until I was in my junior year in college and it was considered state of the art with a whopping 56K!

    #34 3 years ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    I still marvel at some of this older technology.

    SeenSay_(resized).jpg

    And the sheep says "Barrr", think we still have one somewhere.

    #35 3 years ago

    I remember thinking my Apple IIe was the shit because it had an 80 column card and 128k of RAM.

    #36 3 years ago
    Quoted from pinball_faz:

    You are so correct; It's been a while since I even held one in my hand... let alone cut the slot out on the other side to get double sided storage. I was out of my office until this morning.... and wanted to include some extra fun.
    The standard is "pics or it did not happen... so". I included a marker in the shots to give some scale.
    8", 5 1/4" and a 3.5" Floppy
    FloppiesX3.jpg
    PunchCard
    PunchCard.jpg
    6150 Cassette Tape
    6150Cassette.jpg
    Bernoulli Cartridge - VERY 80's tech. This was cutting edge at the time. "Infinite Storage"
    Bernoulli_Cassette.jpg
    Mainframe B&T Terminator
    Terminator.jpg
    Standard Reel-Reel tape
    ReelTape.jpg
    After reels, the 3490E was the standard
    3490E.jpg
    This little bad-boy is an 3850 Mass Storage cartridge. Stored in a hard plastic shell, it sits in a honeycomb of cells. Once the robot gets the request, the cell is addressed, the shell is removed and the robot mounts the tape. Early 90's but still fun.
    MasstoreCassette.jpg
    MasstoreCassette2.jpg
    Boring DLT Tape
    DLTcassette.jpg
    This is my favorite. Definitely 90's tech, but it needs to go in the mix.
    This is a 7GB optical platter. That huge floppy disk design has real glass inside. We burned these onsite for long term storage. I pulled it open so you can see the platter.... it's just like a huge floppy. Heavy too.
    OpticalCassette.jpg
    OpticalCassette2.jpg
    Getting the S1 Drive out is a PITA.. but you can see it on the bottom of my media collection
    Media.jpg
    faz

    Splunk is overpriced. Just set up an elastic / logstash / Kibana stack for free instead.

    #37 3 years ago

    big30_(resized).JPG

    #38 3 years ago
    Quoted from pezpunk:

    Splunk is overpriced. Just set up an elastic / logstash / Kibana stack for free instead.

    Wow! Out of all that, you pick up on Splunk?!?!

    #39 3 years ago
    Quoted from pinball_faz:

    This is my favorite. Definitely 90's tech, but it needs to go in the mix.
    This is a 7GB optical platter. That huge floppy disk design has real glass inside. We burned these onsite for long term storage. I pulled it open so you can see the platter.... it's just like a huge floppy. Heavy too.

    I have never heard of these - that is very cool. Is this basically a digital equivalent of laserdisc tech (which is analog storage)?
    What sorts of write/read speeds would one expect with that behemoth?

    #40 3 years ago

    My parents gave me an 8-track player for my car for my 16th birthday (1980). So I had to get this Sparkomatic adapter to play all my cassette tapes.

    032d1d40f06200689c4fa57159902fab_(resized).jpg

    #41 3 years ago
    Quoted from swampfire:

    My parents gave me an 8-track player for my car for my 16th birthday (1980). So I had to get this Sparkomatic adapter to play all my cassette tapes.

    I had one of those!

    But get this.... I had a pull out of an 8-track player (got it from a junk car in a landfill). I wired up in my room with a 12v transformer. In this, I played 8-track tapes that my brother gave me... and I bought one of these converters, to be able to play cassettes too.

    For an 10 year old kid I had the best you could buy...... for $20
    faz

    #42 3 years ago

    Def remember this little number...is this the one with the optional cassette deck to play games?

    1e17063ab7e0d82b47274d493370bb55_(resized).jpg

    #43 3 years ago
    Quoted from Purpledrilmonkey:

    What sorts of write/read speeds would one expect with that behemoth?

    No clue on the specs but you can still find these cartridges for sale.

    I remember that it was fast to read but slow as sin to request data. The platters needed to be mounted on demand. I had to talk the developer to create an asynchronous request/response api.

    Make request...go get a cup of coffee... come back and get your data.

    For the use case (high latency requests for OLD (super old) data it was perfect).

    A request could take 20 seconds to complete. Almost all of that was clearing out an unused drive, putting away the old cart, finding the new cart, loading it and spinning up the drive.

    All done by robot, but still these things don't go too fast.

    Although I will say, that I had an inside look at a Storage-Tek 3490 robot (forget the number). Had a bizzillion cells in it with a central spindle that had an arm moving up/down to grab a tape from the cell... shove it into the drive. While walking around the drive (probably 10' interior space), the tech said, that if someone closes the door, the arm will lower to the ground and sweep all around the bottom. He said, if that happens ... RUN INTO THE ARM AS SOON AS POSSIBLE to signal fact that you are inside the device. If the arm does not sense a human, it moves at robot speeds. He said, at that point the drive turns into the worlds largest food processor. A human body will not even slow it down.

    faz

    2 months later
    #44 3 years ago
    Quoted from swampfire:

    My parents gave me an 8-track player for my car for my 16th birthday (1980). So I had to get this Sparkomatic adapter to play all my cassette tapes.

    A few years ago I sold a 1978 Cadillac Eldorado to a friend of mine. It had a factory 8 track player. It had an 8 track to cassette adapter. He put one of the cassette to 1/8" headphone plug adapters into that and played his ipod through the factory 8 track player. I laughed when he told me he did that. I was blown away that it worked.

    #45 3 years ago

    8629759687_30305be7ef_(resized).jpg

    #46 3 years ago

    Isn't that your current technology?

    #47 3 years ago

    Here is some 80s technology that is amazing. A HP-15C from 1985 that I've used since I bought it brand new and still use everyday. Made in the USA and the batteries last about 12 years on average. Probably still considered one of the best designed, best built and more sought after calculators ever made. Who doesn't love RPN entry!

    2016-06-13_14.46.07_(resized).jpg

    2 months later
    #48 3 years ago

    I still used a modified C64 until a couple years ago. The sound chips in those are used all over modern electronic music and highly sought after.

    8192282876_79cf2b6d11 (resized).jpg

    #49 3 years ago
    Quoted from schudel5:

    Here is some 80s technology that is amazing. A HP-15C from 1985 that I've used since I bought it brand new and still use everyday. Made in the USA and the batteries last about 12 years on average. Probably still considered one of the best designed, best built and more sought after calculators ever made. Who doesn't love RPN entry!

    Missed this when first posted. I have a HP 15C on my desk at work right now that I originally bought while I was a freshman in college. I use it daily. I also have a 12C at home that gets used a few times a month. RPN rules!

    #50 3 years ago

    If you had one of these

    vcr (resized).jpg
    And one of these
    tv front (resized).jpg

    You were really in hog heaven. You had your library of VCR tapes and there was a huge business with stores renting them.

    Now I have a 60" plasma hanging on the wall and a little server that has an entire library of hundreds of movies and thousands of TV shows that I can watch at the click of a button. We would have fainted over dead in 1984 if we saw that setup.

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    From: $ 99.99
    $ 209.99
    $ 7,995.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    € 339.00
    Displays
    GermanGamingSupplies.com
    $ 76.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 90.00
    Lighting - Under Cabinet
    Rock Custom Pinball
    $ 86.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 27.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 99.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 19.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    From: $ 19.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    From: $ 175.00
    Gameroom - Decorations
    Pinball Photos
    $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Little Shop Of Games
    $ 49.00
    $ 9.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 320.00
    $ 90.00
    Gameroom - Decorations
    The Pinball Vault
    $ 11.95
    $ 229.99
    Lighting - Led
    PinballBulbs
    $ 66.99
    Lighting - Led
    Lee's Parts
    $ 399.95
    $ 6,995.00
    Pinball Machine
    Flip N Out Pinball
    $ 149.00
    Flipper Parts
    Mircoplayfields
    $ 7,499.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    There are 52 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside