TECH—TZ Only Resets When Cold (Doesn’t Reset When Warm Despite 5V Only At 4.8V)

(Topic ID: 79650)

TECH—TZ Only Resets When Cold (Doesn’t Reset When Warm Despite 5V Only At 4.8V)


By NM

4 years ago



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-1
#1 4 years ago

(Initial Post Below Now Updated Reflecting All The Tests Performed So Far/Latest Conditions

My TZ resets the instant both flippers are pressed simultaneously (even at 0 points on the DMD with Ball 1 in the shooter lane)…this happened EVERY time without fail--but only when the game is cold (IE--10 out of 10 times.)

But after the game warms up, it doesn't reset despite the 5V rail being at only 4.80V (I thought these games most certainly reset if under the 4.92 V)?

Anyway, I started methodically trouble shooting the problem by going through all the usual steps:

1. Line voltage: 119.9 volts; with the furnace on: only drops to 118.7 V.
2. 5V TP2 on PDB: shows a pathetic 4.80 Volts.
3. 5V on the CPU on EPROM pin 32: no change, 4.80 Volts.
4. Reseated J101 on the PDB and used a pusher: same voltage on pin 32: 4.80 V.
5. Reseated J114 on the PDB and used a pusher: roughly same voltage on pin 32: 4.79 V.
6. Reseated J210 on the CPU and used a pusher: roughly same voltage on pin 32: 4.77 V.
7. Z connector was previously eliminated.
8. 18-Volt TP8 was between varying between 15.75 and 18.5V.
9. Decided to reseat all 5 connections coming out of the transformer, same voltage afterwards: 4.80 V.
10. All PDB ground screws are tight.
11. Earlier thought I might have a failing DMD or Controller Board, swapped in 2 known good parts; still resets when cold.
12. Thermistor: jumpered around it and game still resets when cold.
13. All other connectors in the power box are secure; in-line fuse holder looks fine.
14. All 8 flipper diodes present; no cold solder joints.
15. DMM reading on BR2: reading on positive leg was 9.86V.
16. C5: reads 0.286 with DMM on AC Auto.

Thanks in advance.

#2 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

Short-term answer would be I must have eliminated some resistance on a connector—but again my question is how CAN the game not be resetting with only 4.80 Volts on the 5V rail? (Played 10 games in a row with multiballs…no resets!)

Thanks in advance.

4.8 on its own isn't enough, its also the dip in voltage cause by the higher than normal impedance of the connectors spiking it even lower. Now you most likely have a nice 'clean' 4.8v.

I thought 4.8 was the low end threshold. Even at that, most problems were not from being at the threshold but by spiking below.

#3 4 years ago

Also, could be smal meter variance. And could be the machine doesn't reset once warmed up.

-1
#4 4 years ago
Quoted from markmon:

Also, could be smal meter variance. And could be the machine doesn't reset once warmed up.

UPDATE:

Wow, what a 180-degree turn:

Markmon, your instinct was 100% right--I just tried the game after it sat all night and it's back to resetting every time both flips are pressed simultaneously (with Ball 1 in the shooter lane and 0 points on the DMD)!

I'll continue going through the guide later where I left off to pinpoint the cause, but is there any typical culprit in a case like this (when a game only resets when cold & not after it's warmed up)?

Thanks.

#5 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

UPDATE:
Wow, what a 180-degree turn:
Markmon, your instinct was 100% right--I just tried the game after it sat all night and it's back to resetting every time both flips are pressed simultaneously (with Ball 1 in the shooter lane and 0 points on the DMD)!
I'll continue plotting through the guide later to pinpoint the cause, but what's the usual culprit in a case like this (when a game only resets when cold & not after it's warmed up)?
Thanks.

Maybe the Thermister?

#6 4 years ago

Don't mistake the thermistor for the thermal detonator that Boushh is holding right next to your pin.

#7 4 years ago

Hey NM,

I just went through this with my TZ like 2 days ago! Strange how these things run in cycles. Anyway before I did anything I checked the 5v to computer, with both flippers pressed it dipped down to like 4.6v and even less. It was intermittent, but happened every time once the game warmed up. I also checked the voltage out of C5 and BR2. You can do this with a meter which I highly recommend before replacing. Also I went through the transformer connections and the connections to the driver board.

Here is a good debug guide:
http://www.pinwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Williams_WPC#Game_resets

So I know my C5 was bad from my tests, I replaced that and went ahead and replaced BR2 (cost me $30.00 in parts). Problem solved.

I've now got a strange hum from the speakers (faint but you can hear it and I know I did not have that before). I'm thinking this could be the power transistor on the driver board or caps on the sound card but I'll have to tackle that on another day.

Good luck!

-1
#8 4 years ago
Quoted from burningman:

Maybe the Thermister?

Good suggestion re the cold vs. warm angle but I just ruled out the Thermister by jumpering around it (game still reset with a jumper while cold). Thanks.

And thanks for the suggestion Mantra of where your issue was, I'll check it out.

I actually have both PinWiki & Clay's guides and will get back on working through them later.

-2
#9 4 years ago

Amazon sells 5v/12v arcade power supplies for about $15. I've just installed those a few times to avoid the whole troubleshooting process. Tap it into the black and white wire that feeds the coindoor so it's switched. Then put a molex push connector on the wires and its plug and play. $20 in parts and 20 min install and 90% of the time it's solved.

#10 4 years ago

anigif_enhanced-buzz-24877-1368536475-9-973.gif

Or, just fix it right. If your car radio stopped working do you start driving with a boom box on the front seat?

#11 4 years ago

I hate it when people I know buy games and this kind of junk needs to be undone. Just went to a guy's house with a switching power supply wired into the boards. Gross stuff.

Quoted from markmon:

Amazon sells 5v/12v arcade power supplies for about $15. I've just installed those a few times to avoid the whole troubleshooting process. Tap it into the black and white wire that feeds the coindoor so it's switched. Then put a molex push connector on the wires and its plug and play. $20 in parts and 20 min install and 90% of the time it's solved.

#12 4 years ago
Quoted from Patofnaud:

Or, just fix it right. If your car radio stopped working do you start driving with a boom box on the front seat?

Reminds me of how I fixed the car radio in my Plymouth 'wonder car'. Radio, stopped working - pulled out short, wide Plymouth radio and installed tall, narrow Ford Radio. Mr hack saw helped tremendously. Yes, It was a pretty work of art - fit right in with all the fist marks and dents in the dashboard from me hitting it in a desparate effort to silence the millions of rattles, squeaks and groans.

But, yes - I agree to fix it right and be done with it. No hacking in oddball power supplies that were never intended to fit, etc.

#13 4 years ago
Quoted from Patofnaud:

Or, just fix it right. If your car radio stopped working do you start driving with a boom box on the front seat?

It's actually nothing like this poor example you've given. A boom box doesn't perform the same and takes up space in the passenger compartment. A properly wired in power supply takes up no space that's used for anything else and performs exactly like the original would. Except its not a 20 year old circuit.

Quoted from jalpert:

I hate it when people I know buy games and this kind of junk needs to be undone. Just went to a guy's house with a switching power supply wired into the boards. Gross stuff.

Actually if its done right, you don't need to undo anything. Why should you x anything that's working properly? Taking the CPU circuit power off the power board and putting it into a more beefy dedicated power supply seems like a pretty ok idea to me.

#14 4 years ago

If you wanted to get rid of a 20 year old circuit, just swap the power supply with an Xpin. HOWEVER, in the end you never troubleshot the problem so you have no idea it it will return. This could be a simple case of a dirty Z connector which is why you use the wiki and fix it right.

Slapping a switcher in as a bypass is fine if your an operator trying to hack the machine to keep it running on location and bring in money without caring about any resale value of the machine.

#15 4 years ago
Quoted from Patofnaud:

. HOWEVER, in the end you never troubleshot the problem so you have no idea it it will return. This could be a simple case of a dirty Z connector which is why you use the wiki and fix it right.
Slapping a switcher in as a bypass is fine if your an operator trying to hack the machine to keep it running on location and bring in money without caring about any resale value of the machine.

If its a dirty Z connector, then adding an external power supply wouldn't fix it because it doesn't use the Z connector or impact it at all. If the problem isn't in the bypassed circuitry, the added power supply will not fix it. But if it does fix it, it's fixed for good because all the other things are bypassed.

I have actually not bypassed for a game I own but have done it for repairs for local route ops. But I have added power supplies in my own games to run mods. If they're actually mounted properly and not just plugged into the service port but actually wired properly so the power switch works, they're a stable permanent solution. You would never have to worry about things like logic voltage dropping with flipper pulses, etc.

#16 4 years ago

For repair's I personally feel spending the extra time to fix it with the original spec'ed parts are ideal. I've found the Williams and Bally engineering in the DMD era machines are solid, and with parts still accessible it makes me feel better about the repair. I've repaired a lot of machines this way and I've not had to go back and repair it again
Hope you find your problem.

-1
#17 4 years ago

UPDATE:

I think I found the problem: the positive leg of BR2 is reading only 9.86V...this is suppose to be at 12V isn't it?

BTW, there seems to be conflicting info between the two guides on BR2 (unless my eyes are failing me):

Clay's Guide says (in the section entitled: "Testing a Bridge WPC-S and prior, Under Minor Load, In the Game"):

"Any less than 12 volts, and the bridge (or the connection to the bridge) is bad."

But PinWiki says in Section 4.8.10 (an in-game, power-on test also):

"The meter should read about 9V. This will be true whether C4/C5 are working or not. If the bridge rectifier is bad, it will read about 7V".

So which is right?

If 12V is correct, would cracked solder joints here possibly explain why the game doesn't reset when warm?

I guess it's time to now pull the Power Driver Board & examine it for cold solder joints, cracked header pins, etc.--unless there's something I missed that I should try first? (Initial post has now been updated showing all tests done to the game so far/latest conditions.)

Thanks.

#18 4 years ago

Sorry to say this, but I think the pinwiki info is correct--9 volts would be about right for a supply voltage that is being regulated down to 5 volts.

One other approach you can take is to hit suspect areas with cold spray (after the game has warmed up) and see if the problem arises.

#19 4 years ago

PinWiki is correct.

--
Rob Anthony
Pinball Classics
http://LockWhenLit.com
Quality Board Work - In Home Service
borygard at gmail dot com

-1
#20 4 years ago
Quoted from terryb:

Sorry to say this, but I think the pinwiki info is correct--9 volts would be about right for a supply voltage that is being regulated down to 5 volts.

Quoted from Borygard:

PinWiki is correct.

Thanks for the clarification.

Any ideas on what I should try next (given my updated work-through list in my initial post--other than the cold spray idea on the suspect areas on the PDB or CPU)?

Or is it now time to pull the boards--and look for cold solder joints/cracked header pins, etc.?

Is there something I missed--before I pull the boards individually/or sub-in known good boards?

Thank you.

#21 4 years ago

If you hack an external power supply into a broken game, you still have a broken game.

I would undo it because its not the proper way to repair the game. The boards are 100% fixable, hacking in power supplies is incorrect. If it's not in your ability, you can send boards off for about $100 in most cases. Just the cost of pin ownership.

#22 4 years ago

Take a look at both sides of the J101 connector.
If either side is tarnished, replace them.

Thanks for working thru the PinWiki steps!
--
Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
http://www.Team-EM.com
http://webpages.charter.net/chibler/Pinball/index.htm
http://www.PinWiki.com - The new place for pinball repair info

-1
#23 4 years ago
Quoted from ChrisHibler:

Take a look at both sides of the J101 connector.
If either side is tarnished, replace them.
Thanks for working thru the PinWiki steps!

Thank you for PinWiki!

Will do on J101 (but FWIW, observed J101 has already had the IDC replaced with Trifurcons/new housing).

#24 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

Will do on J101 (but FWIW, observed J101 has already had the IDC replaced with Trifurcons/new housing).

O. OK. I missed that in the original/edited post.
--
Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
http://www.Team-EM.com
http://webpages.charter.net/chibler/Pinball/index.htm
http://www.PinWiki.com - The new place for pinball repair info

#25 4 years ago

I know you said you re-worked J101, but if you're in the mood for trying something that probably won't hurt and don't mind possibly wasting 5 or less minutes....

This might sound odd, but try removing J101. Now, re-install it about 1/2 to 3/4 of the way on to the connector pins and do a cold start. Does the game run ok now? I found out my J101 connector was causing some resets one time by doing this; the tarnish was preventing a perfect connection only when the plug was 100 percent on, because.. well that's where you are supposed to push it on until. (edit - when I pushed it on less than all the way, the untarnished area of the pins seemed to make a better connection, and things were fine... just indicated it was time to replace that stuff)

-1
#26 4 years ago

Will do.

FWIW guys, the work on J101 was done by a PO/unknown how long ago.

Thanks.

#27 4 years ago
Quoted from jalpert:

If you hack an external power supply into a broken game, you still have a broken game.
I would undo it because its not the proper way to repair the game. The boards are 100% fixable, hacking in power supplies is incorrect. If it's not in your ability, you can send boards off for about $100 in most cases. Just the cost of pin ownership.

Ok so you are seriously saying that its preferable to pay $100 and send a board off in the mail and wait 3 months for repair vs buying about $20 in parts and installing them in a couple days? You use the same connector and simply plug it into the CPU board. There is no hacking. Honestly, this sounds like the type of decision that's purely emotional and not based on any form of logic whatsoever. A new, beefier power supply seems preferable to a 20 year old repaired one.

Also, if the 5v power section on the board doesn't work, what's the difference between replacing it internally on the board vs externally off the board? I'm looking for a technical answer other then an emotional one like "it feels like a hack". I could easily respond to that with "it feels like a working game". And if we are going to try some answer like "because that's not how it was originally designed" then I assume we think all other replacement boards like pinled that replace original components with compatible but different ones is also a hack?

#28 4 years ago

Why exaggerate? Three months for a board repair? Come on, you know it doesn't take that. 3 weeks maybe.

You want a technical answer why it's wrong? How about more parts means more parts to fail. Once you fix the boards, they should go another 20 years. Power supplies are much less reliable.

How about more heat? Inserts raise due to the light bulb softening the glue and the pressure of the wood affects them. The cab doesn't need any more heat.

Also, what about the next guy that gets the game? I see hacked BS in the cab and I immediately wonder what other hacks I will find. You are devaluing the game.

Quoted from markmon:

Ok so you are seriously saying that its preferable to pay $100 and send a board off in the mail and wait 3 months for repair vs buying about $20 in parts and installing them in a couple days? You use the same connector and simply plug it into the CPU board. There is no hacking. Honestly, this sounds like the type of decision that's purely emotional and not based on any form of logic whatsoever. A new, beefier power supply seems preferable to a 20 year old repaired one.

Also, if the 5v power section on the board doesn't work, what's the difference between replacing it internally on the board vs externally off the board? I'm looking for a technical answer other then an emotional one like "it feels like a hack". I could easily respond to that with "it feels like a working game". And if we are going to try some answer like "because that's not how it was originally designed" then I assume we think all other replacement boards like pinled that replace original components with compatible but different ones is also a hack?

#29 4 years ago
Quoted from jalpert:

Why exaggerate? Three months for a board repair? Come on, you know it doesn't take that. 3 weeks maybe.

Last time I asked, boryguard and Chris were both almost 3 months out. Luckily, I'm able to fix most problems on my boards.

#30 4 years ago
Quoted from markmon:

Last time I asked, boryguard and Chris were both almost 3 months out. Luckily, I'm able to fix most problems on my boards.

I can't speak to the other guy's queues, but I've been turning boards rapidly.
At this time, I usually quote a week to diagnose, repair, and test 100%.
If I let the queue build...there will be no catching up...
--
Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
http://www.Team-EM.com
http://webpages.charter.net/chibler/Pinball/index.htm
http://www.PinWiki.com - The Place to go for Pinball Repair Info

-1
#31 4 years ago

UPDATE: decided to pull the PDB and swap in a known good one.

Recall the previous reading on TP2 on the suspect board was 4.8V--and with the known-good board in the game that same reading has now gone up to 4.97V...and the game hasn't reset when cold as of this writing.

Visual inspection of the board revealed no cold solder joints.

BR1 and BR2 have previously been replaced--so has J120.

Remember: BR2 tested fine in the game, and the solder side looks fine.

J120, J121, and J115 appear to have been reflowed.

There are no cracked power or ground header pins or cracked solder at J101, J102, or J103.

The LM323K regulator has no fractured solder joints.

Fuse 113 also has no fractured solder joints.

However, what I did find is that on multiple connectors the plating has worn off right where the female connector mates with it--found this condition on J101, J102, J103, J114 and on many more .156 pins...could that alone account for that much of a difference between the two boards (of 4.8 to 4.97V)?

If not, it might just be time to send in this tired old board in for professional refurb.

Thanks.

#32 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

multiple connectors the plating has worn off right where the female connector mates with it--found this condition on J101, J102, J103, J114 and on many more .156 pins...could that alone account for that much of a difference between the two boards

Yes.
When the connectors have reached this stage, I replace them. If it was a coil drive connector, no big deal. But the system requires a nice clean ~5VDC, and this can impact it. What you found also means that it is likely that the female side of that connector needs to be replaced too. Similar damage occurs on both sides of the connection.

This problem is exactly what SteveP3 was aiming at, above.

Quoted from SteveP3:

This might sound odd, but try removing J101. Now, re-install it about 1/2 to 3/4 of the way on to the connector pins and do a cold start.

--
Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
http://www.Team-EM.com
http://webpages.charter.net/chibler/Pinball/index.htm
http://www.PinWiki.com - The Place to go for Pinball Repair Info

-1
#33 4 years ago
Quoted from ChrisHibler:

Yes.
When the connectors have reached this stage, I replace them. If it was a coil drive connector, no big deal. But the system requires a nice clean ~5VDC, and this can impact it. What you found also means that it is likely that the female side of that connector needs to be replaced too. Similar damage occurs on both sides of the connection.
This problem is exactly what SteveP3 was aiming at, above.

Very good.

What are the critical ones if I wanted to take a minimalist approach for now: J101, J102, J103, and J114?

Yes, I wanted to try SteveP3's excellent suggestion but just decided to proceed directly to pulling/swapping PDBs.

Thanks again.

#34 4 years ago

Can you trigger a reset by wiggling those connectors? One of my machines reset infrequently, but I discovered that wiggling J101 would trigger it.

#35 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

Very good.
What are the critical ones if I wanted to take a minimalist approach for now: J101, J102, J103, and J114?
Yes, I wanted to try SteveP3's excellent suggestion but just decided to proceed directly to pulling/swapping PDBs.
Thanks again.

J101 and J114 are the most important.
--
Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
http://www.Team-EM.com
http://webpages.charter.net/chibler/Pinball/index.htm
http://www.PinWiki.com - The new place for pinball repair info

#36 4 years ago
Quoted from markmon:

Last time I asked, boryguard and Chris were both almost 3 months out. Luckily, I'm able to fix most problems on my boards.

My board was out about 2 months...I sent it to dragster. I don't mind sending the boards out for repair cost wise, the time it takes is what gives me pause.

#37 4 years ago

Sure as $hit. That meter only has those two "useless for pinball" AC settings.
Time for a trip to the RatShack for an auto ranging meter.
--
Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
http://www.Team-EM.com
http://webpages.charter.net/chibler/Pinball/index.htm
http://www.PinWiki.com - The new place for pinball repair info

-1
#38 4 years ago
Quoted from ChrisHibler:

J101 and J114 are the most important.

OK; I'll make this repair in a week or so and report back (had to order a new adjustable-temperature soldering station).

Many thanks for all the help Chris (and again for PinWiki...it's a FANTASTIC resource!)...and thanks to all responders in the thread!

NM

2 weeks later
-1
#39 4 years ago

UPDATE--replaced the header on J101 and that wasn't the culprit.

Recap:

This game's TP2 was at 4.82V on its PDB--and the game had no drop from the PDB to the CPU at Pin 32.

Swapped in a known-good PDB and TP2 soared to 4.97V (with no more resets of course).

BR2 tested good and it's evident BR2 & BR1 have been replaced by the PO (but looks like C5 & C4 are original).

Female connector at J101 also replaced (by the PO) besides the J101 header I just replaced on the PDB.

Did all the other stuff on the check-list from A to Z (details listed in my initial post).

So what's next: go back and reflow/replace the solder at BR2, C5 & C4 before replacing parts?

Should I add BR2 jumpers to C5 while I'm there?

Anything else?

Thanks.

#40 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

...Should I add BR2 jumpers to C5 while I'm there?

If parts have been replaced unprofessionally or by someone unknown, yes, run the jumpers.

--
Rob Anthony
Pinball Classics
http://LockWhenLit.com
Quality Board Work - In Home Service
borygard at gmail dot com

#41 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

UPDATE--replaced the header on J101 and that wasn't the culprit.
Recap:
This game's TP2 was at 4.82V on its PDB--and the game had no drop from the PDB to the CPU at Pin 32.
Swapped in a known-good PDB and TP2 soared to 4.97V (with no more resets of course).
BR2 tested good and it's evident BR2 & BR1 have been replaced by the PO (but looks like C5 & C4 are original).

Thanks.

NM,

One of these might help:

ebay.com link

Rob

#42 4 years ago
Quoted from rkahr:

NM,
One of these might help:
ebay.com link
Rob

NM,
PS seems to break the link (or maybe operator error on this side) - search for item number 281270779341.

Rob

-1
#43 4 years ago
Quoted from rkahr:

NM,
PS seems to break the link (or maybe operator error on this side) - search for item number 281270779341.
Rob

Thanks Rob, very interesting--here's a working link:

ebay.com link

Noted from the YouTube it's plug n play on the CPU--guessing the design accounts for if the problem originates from the PDB?

#44 4 years ago

I have had the 3/4 connect on j101 stop this exact behavior. I don't understand why it works, but it does. Also make sure that your voltage regulator is making good connection.

-1
#45 4 years ago

PS--remember this game resets only when cold.

Did some RGP research and found that cold resets:

"Could indicate that the filter caps C5 on the Power Driver PCB ... could be dryed out. Dry caps don't filter well until they warm-up."

And I THINK my C5 is original, but not sure (sloppy work on BR2 & BR1...C5 appears untouched but who knows).

BTW, my Thermistor tests fine.

So plan is now: reflow/replace solder on BR2, BR1, C5, C4, and add jumpers from BR2 to C5.

And if that craps out, replace C5.

Sound good/anything else?

#46 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

Thanks Rob, very interesting--here's a working link:
ebay.com link
Noted from the YouTube it's plug n play on the CPU--guessing the design accounts for if the problem originates from the PDB?
» YouTube video

NM,

I struggle to answer your guess with a "yes" or "no" because my design compensates for imperfections in the PDB performance without outright replacing the linear supplies on the PDB. So, the PDB 5 volt supply still needs to drive other boards. A supply weakened by age is better able to do this with the load of the MPU removed (I measured the MPU load at 1/4 watt in my PZ). The PDB also must have a sufficiently working 12 volt supply to drive the switched 5 volt supply generated in the daughterboard. The daughterboard is very tolerant of fluctuations in the 12 volt supply - it will work from 7 volts up to about 30-35 volts.

That PZ of mine will play without the daughterboard if I unplug either the sound card or the GI, but it goes straight into resets with both plugged in. In this "unplugged" mode it is playable but still resets occasionally (maybe 45 mins of playing). Being tired of chasing that gremlin and make the linear power perfect, I lived with it for a long time until I dreamed up the daughterboard.

So, no, it doesn't eliminate the need for best practices like replacing failed capacitors, burnt connectors, failed regulators, and fixing outright shorts anywhere in the machine, but yes, it does allow for a lot more tolerance in the many aspects impacting PDB power supply performance including compensating for imperfections in work performed on the PDB power supplies.

I'm planning a more general announcement of these daughterboards in mid-March when I will have a good supply. In my view your thread (and another I replied to on RGP last week) just begged for my daughterboard so I offered the link to my daughterboard as kind of a "soft launch". If you didn't get the last one on eBay two more are available via a paypal purchase on www.kahr.us. I will have 9 more available on the 26th of Feb. After that, look for the launch in mid-March. I hope this detail doesn't hijack your thread - we should stay focused on discussing your TZ.

Rob

#47 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

Thanks Rob, very interesting--here's a working link:
ebay.com link
Noted from the YouTube it's plug n play on the CPU--guessing the design accounts for if the problem originates from the PDB?
» YouTube video

Unfortunately this solution is a band-aid to the actual problem. I suspect that because it's a very quick and easy band-aid that some will latch onto it and consider it the greatest thing ever. I also suspect it will severely tax the 12V regulated power and cause issues there.

One thing that really bothers me though, is the sales pitch blames the CPU's watchdog. The watchdog is actually very rarely the problem with WPC reset issues. It's very easy to disable the watchdog, do that and watch the resets continue.

--
Rob Anthony
Pinball Classics
http://LockWhenLit.com
Quality Board Work - In Home Service
borygard at gmail dot com

#48 4 years ago
Quoted from Borygard:

Unfortunately this solution is a band-aid to the actual problem. I suspect that because it's a very quick and easy band-aid that some will latch onto it and consider it the greatest thing ever. I also suspect it will severely tax the 12V regulated power and cause issues there.
One thing that really bothers me though, is the sales pitch blames the CPU's watchdog. The watchdog is actually very rarely the problem with WPC reset issues. It's very easy to disable the watchdog, do that and watch the resets continue.
--
Rob Anthony
Pinball Classics
http://LockWhenLit.com
Quality Board Work - In Home Service
borygard at gmail dot com

Yes, if I was looking for a quick fix I think I would have gone directly to the "Last Resort" of boosting the 5V to 5.15V with a 22 ohm 1/2 watt resistor & cutting the traces (still might have to LOL). Ridiculously cheap too: only about $1 in parts.

But I really want to find the cause of this now.

It's gotten personal...man vs. machine.

Thanks for the assistance.

#49 4 years ago

I thought everything I always read suggested replacing the capacitors when you replace the bridge rectifier. If your C5 is original, but BR2 is not, replacement seems like the obvious place to start.

#50 4 years ago
Quoted from NM:

Yes, if I was looking for a quick fix I think I would have gone directly to the "Last Resort" of boosting the 5V to 5.15V with a 22 ohm 1/2 watt resistor & cutting the traces (still might have to LOL). Ridiculously cheap too: only about $1 in parts.
But I really want to find the cause of this now.
It's gotten personal...man vs. machine.

Thanks for the assistance.

Don't cut the traces - use vinyl screws/nuts to isolate the heat sink from ground so the resistor hack can be un-done more easily. I get the man/machine logic...I'll be around if that calculus changes.

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