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(Topic ID: 186644)

Mr. Tantrum's Guide to PinSound


By Mr_Tantrum

3 years ago



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  • Latest reply 3 days ago by Jakusu
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    Topic index (key posts)

    10 key posts have been marked in this topic

    Display key post list sorted by: Post date | Keypost summary | User name

    Post #1 Overview of Pinsound and what is needed to install and set up. Posted by Mr_Tantrum (3 years ago)

    Post #137 Examples of event and the instrumental related to it. Posted by Mr_Tantrum (1 year ago)

    Post #182 Pinsound + Board showing adjustments. Posted by pinballjah (10 months ago)

    Post #246 Shaker Control Posted by Mr_Tantrum (7 months ago)

    Post #247 How to edit shaker routines. Posted by Mr_Tantrum (7 months ago)

    Post #263 Determining which Pinsound you have. Posted by Mr_Tantrum (6 months ago)

    Post #267 USB drives that are compatible. Posted by pinballinreno (6 months ago)

    Post #469 Normalizing sound files. Posted by Mr_Tantrum (5 months ago)

    Post #489 Best to convert OGG files to WAV files. Posted by Mr_Tantrum (5 months ago)


    Topic indices are generated from key posts and maintained by Pinside Editors. For more information, or to become an editor yourself read this post!

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    #1 3 years ago

    Last Update: 2017.12.28 - Added New PinSound Orchestration Videos

    So, while I don't consider myself an expert, I am a new owner of a PinSound who has created my own custom orchestration. I've had a few people ask me how it's done, so I thought I would start this topic as a tutorial for those who are thinking about purchasing a PinSound or who already have one but don't really know how to customize their sounds. Like most things, while not overly difficult there is a required set of tools, a fairly defined process, some learning required, and much trial and error to get things exactly right. So, with that stated, here we go.

    To begin with, you may see a sample of my Getaway orchestration before and after here (I have made a few tweaks since I shot this video):

    Before PinSound

    After PinSound with my first custom orchestration

    Here are my latest Getaway orchestrations (please note sound quality is not representative of real world, but best I could do with my action camera). Setup is PinSound with upgraded stereo speakers and bass.

    Standard Orchestration:

    ZZ Top Orchestration:

    ZZ Top Techno Orchestration:

    U2 Orchestration:

    Mixed Artist "I Can't Drive 55" Orchestration:

    Nirvana Orchestration:

    Techno Orchestration:

    Baby Driver Orchestration:

    John Wick Orchestration:

    Here is a instruction video on how to manually convert and install a PinSound orchestration from a ZIP file containing OGG sound files:

    Link to all my Getaway orchestrations: http://pinsound-community.org/forum/index.php?/files/category/22-getaway

    P.S. I will be fleshing out this post more in the near future, but wanted to get started even though I have more to add.

    WHAT IS PINSOUND?

    Well, my basic answer to this question is "awesome!" To elaborate a little, PinSound (www.pinsound.org) is an ingenious device that is a replacement for your sound board. In works on a variety of machines including: Data East R3, Williams System 11C, Bally/Williams WPC, Bally/Willimas WPC DCS, and Bally/Williams WPC 95. Before you purchase a PinSound, you will want to confirm that you pin is supported. You may do this by referencing the compatibility list at https://www.pinsound.org/pinballs. PinSound is true 2.1 stereo sound (back speakers + cabinet) with a CD quality sampling rate (44Khz), and you can find all the detailed specs here: https://www.pinsound.org/pinsound-board

    HOW DOES IT WORK?

    Well, I can't really answer the "how" part of the question from an engineering perspective, but basically what is occurring is that when your pins programming sends a call to the sound card whenever an event occurs. This call is encoded as a specific ID (it is digital, afterall). When PinSound receives this ID from the processor, it references its sound files, looks up the ID, then plays the sound file it has stored under that ID (more detail on this below). Thus, with this methodology you can make any sound you want occur for a specific event. You are not reprogramming the events, rather, you are simply changing the sounds that occur when events happen (e.g. theme music, ball launch, target hit, mode change, etc.)

    THE TOOLS REQUIRED

    1. A PinSound board (sorry for stating the obvious) | You can purchase your PinSound board directly from http://pinsound.com, but please realize these are produced in France where the inventors live. So, if you are impatient and don't want to wait for shipping (could be up to two weeks to US), then you can also find some distribution from resellers inside the US. I purchased mine at TPF this year as the guys do attend specific shows throughout the year.

    2. Speakers | For many the default cabinet speakers may suffice. However, you will want to consider upgrading depending upon the model of pin you have and your current speaker condition. If your speakers are original to your cabinet on an older machine they will work. However, they may sound terrible. Many pins, like my WPC 89, where not designed to handle heavy base or a broad frequency range in general. Also, if you weren't the original owner you don't know what conditions your pin has been through. You need to closely inspect your speakers for damage which will also greatly inhibit the sound quality. Personally, I upgraded my speakers with low cost aftermarket ones and they sound great. However, you can always purchase speakers directly from PinSound or go with a Flipper Fidelity kit.

    3. PinSound Accessories | If you have a mono system pin like me, you are going to want to rewire the speakers. While this is not required as the PinSound supports mono sound with your pin's default connectors, I don't think you are purchasing a PinSound to sound like your grandparents' transistor radio. Not difficult if you know what wire is and how to solder, but you can make it a little easier by purchasing the optional stereo 2.1 wiring harness. This comes with the required connector and six cables (3 pair) plenty long to reach where they need to. You will still need to solder the tips to the speaker leads or do what I did and solder on quick connects to the wire that then plug onto the speaker leads. If you want to use headphones with your PinSound then you will want to purchase the switched headphone cabinet kit. You can buy with or without headphones if you already have some (uses standard 1/8" stereo plug), and once installed you can set to turn off or leave on the speakers when headphones are plugged in. Finally, some pin models require an adapter kit and others even support a remote control. Just be sure to read everything on the site for your model, and it will tell you what you need to buy.

    4. PinSound Studio | You may download the application for free here: https://www.pinsound.org/pinsound-studio. Also, you don't have to even have a PinSound board to use this. As a matter of fact, I had my first reorchestration fully developed using all of the tools before I had ever laid my hands on a PinSound board. At first it is a little confusing what PinSound Studio does. It is not an editing system, rather, it is a simulation system. It allows you to simulate/test what a game will sound like on you computer. To this, you need two basic components: one or more orchestrations and one or more psrec files specific to your pin. A psrec file is an event recording from actual game play on a pin. While the program comes with a few psrec files, you can get both psrec and orchestrations from the PinSound Community forums (see below). Alternatively, once you have installed your PinSound then you can capture and create your own psrec files. Why do this instead of just copying the files directly to your pin for testing? Simple answer - time. Orchestrations take a ton of work and require all sorts of listening to over and over to get it right. You do not want to have to continually go back and forth to your pinball machine to test every little change you make when you can do it in seconds from your PC. So, using PinSound studio, you install your orchestration(s), select your psrec file to use, select the orchestration you want to use, the press play. The software then visually crawls through the recorded event sequence, and you hear what your orchestration will sound like in real-time game play. You can see which sound file fires for which event and for what duration, which gives you critical information when designing specific game sounds.

    5. A PinSound Community Account | You will want to register for a free http://pinsound-community.org account. Here you can download psrec files, default orchestrations for your pin, and custom orchestrations that others have posted. Just to be clear PinSound DOES NOT SHIP WITH SOUND FILES. I'm sure this is due to licensing constraints, so it is up to you to find/make your own sound files. While there is a methodology using a virtual pinball platform, I did not go that route and such is beyond the scope of this post. Also, not all pins have psrec files or orchestrations available. This is still a new product although it has been on the market for a few years. It is a combination of an enthusiasts designed, developed, and manufactured hardware solution along with a community supported sound development solution.

    6. Your Pin's Default Sound Library | For most pins you will find this under the "Downloads" tab on the PinSound Community forum. Pins are listed by category, so you simply find yours, click on the appropriate link, agree that you own the pin, and download the zip file. By default, the zip file will contain everything you need but the audio file format will be OGG. I don't really know what this is other than a highly compressed audio format, but PinSound requires WAV files to work - sort of. If you want to develop your own orchestrations then you will need to work with WAV files. This requires that you convert the OGG files using the tool listed below. However, if you just want to play what others have already developed and not do any customizations, then no conversion is required. You simply copy the ZIP file you download to the provided USB driver, insert into your PinSound Board, turn you pin on and the PinSound will extract and convert the files as needed. Be prepared to wait as this can take 30 minutes or more for the first time. After the initial sound file installation, the PinSound may take 10-20 seconds upon each reboot of the pin before it is ready to go (it provided audible feedback so you know what is going on).

    7. FRE:AC (Free Audio Converter) | If you are going to create your own customer orchestration then you will need this. You will use this tool to initially convert the entire contents of the orchestration structure that you download from OGG files to WAV files. This is crucial because this structure will contain every folder, sound file, and naming convention that is required for you to create your own orchestration. In other words, you will use the default sound structure as a template to your reorchestration. You only have to do this once per orchestration file that you download, and there is a good write-up on this process. To download click here: http://www.freac.org/index.php/en/downloads-mainmenu-33, and to see a walk-thru of the process, visit here: https://www.pinsound.org/sound-conversion.

    8. Audacity | This is a powerful free audio editing tool available at http://www.audacityteam.org. I'm not going to go into step-by-step how to use the tool (although I will give a little more detail later on), but you can use this to do everything you need with sound files for the purposes of PinSound. In my case here is everything I used the tool for: capturing audio sounds and effects I wanted from various online playing, trimming and splicing audio files for content and length purposes, converting sound files to stereo, and exporting sound files to correct WAV format. While there is some art to mixing audio, for our basic purposes most anyone can do it with a little knowledge and practice. Pleas familiarize yourself with the software by accessing the online manual and watching YouTube videos.

    9. Audacity Nyquist Effect Plug-ins | Audacity already has a ton of features and filters build in that you will use including normalization, fade outs, etc. However, it also supports plugins to achieve additional effects. The one additional plug I utilized was the Pseudo-Stereo effect. This allows you to take files that were originally mono, and create two channels with distinct waves (e.g. not just two identical mono channels). This is a free plugin that can be obtained here: http://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/Nyquist_Effect_Plug-ins

    INSTALLATION
    - Hardware & Connections
    - Speaker considerations & wiring diagram
    - Audio Adjustments & Tweaking Sound (dials & settings)
    - Firmware Update | Information on updating the PinSound firmware is located here: https://www.pinsound.org/pinsound-board-firmware

    HOW TO GET PINSOUND WORKING ON YOUR PIN

    - USB Drive | All orchestrations must be place on a USB drive in a pre-defined order and format (see below for folder structure). The USB drive serves as memory for the PinSound, so it must always remained plugged into the USB port during operation.

    - Default Orchestration | PinSound typically does not come with an orchestration, so you must download the sounds specific to your pin. The PinSound Forum has many default sound files (i.e. the original sounds of your pin) that you may download. Just navigate to the files section of the site at http://pinsound-community.org/forum/index.php?/files, select your system, select your pin, then download the original orchestration. Unfortunately, original orchestrations aren't available for every pin, which is why the PinSound community needs to share their creations with others.

    - Orchestration Installation |

    Option 1 (simple/automatic) - After download, copy the zip file to the root of the USB drive, then put the USB drive into PinSound and turn on pin. Using this default method, the PinSound board will automatically extract the zip file, perform any file format conversion, and create the required folder structure. Along the way the PinSound will provide audio feedback regarding progress. One the install is complete, you simply reboot the pin and you are ready to go. This same method can be followed if you are installing just one or multiple sound files (do one at a time).

    Option 2 (advanced/manual/custom) - Extract on your computer to perform the file conversion (default format from downloads is OGG, but you will need to convert to WAV files). Once extracted you will then need to use a tool like FRE:AC to perform batch OGG to ZIP conversion, then you will delete all of the original OGG files. Now that you have the entire file structure on your computer you are free to replace WAV files with new ones, add additional WAV files to sound folders, etc. (i.e. build a custom orchestration). When ready, you can then copy the entire parent orchestration folder under the "audio" folder on the PinSound USB. Doing this "installs" the orchestration, and it is now ready for use.

    HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN ORCHESTRATION
    - Acquiring sounds
    - Mixing sounds
    - Applying stereo effect
    - Sound duration
    - File formats
    - Folder Structure | The folder structure on your PinSound USB drive is normalized and must be followed for the PinSound to operate properly. Here is an example of what the file structure looks like on my USB drive with 5 different orchestrations (the original and four custom):

    1. Root folder with "audio" (where all mixes go in sub folders), ".mix" this is created by PinSound for the current selected mix, and "config.ini"
    1.jpg

    2. Within the audio folder, each mix has it's own folder
    2.jpg

    3. Within each mix folder you have the sub folders for the sound categories
    3.jpg

    4. Within each category you have the individual sound folders
    4.jpg

    5. Within each sound folder you have the individual WAV sound file(s) - you can have more than one and they will be played randomly for that event
    5.jpg

    - To Convert to OGG or not
    - Testing on your PC (need .psrec files)
    - Special files

    ODDS & ENDS
    - Headphones (installation, options)
    - Multiple Orchestrations Available
    - PinSound Forums
    - Config Files

    #2 3 years ago

    Wow. This is very comprehensive. I'm going to look into setting this up on some of my games. I have heard examples of what this can do but never used it firsthand. Thank you for taking time to post the links and detailed instructions.

    #3 3 years ago

    Wow! Thanks - I was an early supporter of PinSound and even I_ didn't realise you needed to find additional psrec files. I was off to the races with my TZ and have just been using the original DCS sounds , but recently added another one and have been getting into creating custom sound schemes for my DW

    Another phenomenal edit suite is called "Reaper" and is only $50. It's as full-featured as Adobe Audition/CoolEditPro but better IMO. I like the interface a tad bit more than Audacity too

    #4 3 years ago

    Great write up !!
    I'll be following
    I am now considering PinSound for my Getaway
    What speakers did you upgrade too?
    I read that stock speakers will work as well
    I'm sure there is a benefit to changing them out Right?

    #5 3 years ago
    Quoted from Mr_Tantrum:

    So, while I don't consider myself an expert, I am a new owner of a PinSound who has created my own custom orchestration. I've had a few people ask me how it's done, so I thought I would start this topic as a tutorial for those who are thinking about purchasing a PinSound or who already have one but don't really know how to customize their sounds. Like most things, while not overly difficult there is a required set of tools, a fairly defined process, some learning required, and much trial and error to get things exactly right. So, with that stated, here we go.
    P.S. I will be fleshing out this post more in the new future, but wanted to get started even though I have more to add.
    WHAT IS PINSOUND?
    Well, my basic answer to this question is "awesome!" To elaborate a little, PinSound (www.pinsound.org) is an ingenious device that is a replacement for your sound board. In works on a variety of machines including: Data East R3, Williams System 11C, Bally/Williams WPC, Bally/Willimas WPC DCS, and Bally/Williams WPC 95. Before you purchase a PinSound, you will want to confirm that you pin is supported. You may do this by referencing the compatibility list at https://www.pinsound.org/pinballs. PinSound is true 2.1 stereo sound (back speakers + cabinet) with a CD quality sampling rate (44Khz), and you can find all the detailed specs here: https://www.pinsound.org/pinsound-board
    HOW DOES IT WORK?
    Well, I can't really answer the "how" part of the question from an engineering perspective, but basically what is occurring is that when your pins programming sends a call to the sound card whenever an event occurs. This call is encoded as a specific ID (it is digital, afterall). When PinSound receives this ID from the processor, it references its sound files, looks up the ID, then plays the sound file it has stored under that ID (more detail on this below). Thus, with this methodology you can make any sound you want occur for a specific event. You are not reprogramming the events, rather, you are simply changing the sounds that occur when events happen (e.g. theme music, ball launch, target hit, mode change, etc.)
    THE TOOLS REQUIRED
    1. A PinSound board (sorry for stating the obvious) | You can purchase your PinSound board directly from http://pinsound.com, but please realize these are produced in France where the inventors live. So, if you are impatient and don't want to wait for shipping (could be up to two weeks to US), then you can also find some distribution from resellers inside the US. I purchased mine at TPF this year as the guys do attend specific shows throughout the year.
    2. Speakers | For many the default cabinet speakers may suffice. However, you will want to consider upgrading depending upon the model of pin you have and your current speaker condition. If your speakers are original to your cabinet on an older machine they will work. However, they may sound terrible. Many pins, like my WPC 89, where not designed to handle heavy base or a broad frequency range in general. Also, if you weren't the original owner you don't know what conditions your pin has been through. You need to closely inspect your speakers for damage which will also greatly inhibit the sound quality. Personally, I upgraded my speakers with low cost aftermarket ones and they sound great. However, you can always purchase speakers directly from PinSound or go with a Flipper Fidelity kit.
    3. PinSound Accessories | If you have a mono system pin like me, you are going to want to rewire the speakers. While this is not required as the PinSound supports mono sound with your pin's default connectors, I don't think you are purchasing a PinSound to sound like your grandparents' transistor radio. Not difficult if you know what wire is and how to solder, but you can make it a little easier by purchasing the optional stereo 2.1 wiring harness. This comes with the required connector and six cables (3 pair) plenty long to reach where they need to. You will still need to solder the tips to the speaker leads or do what I did and solder on quick connects to the wire that then plug onto the speaker leads. If you want to use headphones with your PinSound then you will want to purchase the switched headphone cabinet kit. You can buy with or without headphones if you already have some (uses standard 1/8" stereo plug), and once installed you can set to turn off or leave on the speakers when headphones are plugged in. Finally, some pin models require an adapter kit and others even support a remote control. Just be sure to read everything on the site for your model, and it will tell you what you need to buy.
    4. PinSound Studio | You may download the application for free here: https://www.pinsound.org/pinsound-studio. Also, you don't have to even have a PinSound board to use this. As a matter of fact, I had my first reorchestration fully developed using all of the tools before I had ever laid my hands on a PinSound board. At first it is a little confusing what PinSound Studio does. It is not an editing system, rather, it is a simulation system. It allows you to simulate/test what a game will sound like on you computer. To this, you need two basic components: one or more orchestrations and one or more psrec files specific to your pin. A psrec file is an event recording from actual game play on a pin. While the program comes with a few psrec files, you can get both psrec and orchestrations from the PinSound Community forums (see below). Alternatively, once you have installed your PinSound then you can capture and create your own psrec files. Why do this instead of just copying the files directly to your pin for testing? Simple answer - time. Orchestrations take a ton of work and require all sorts of listening to over and over to get it right. You do not want to have to continually go back and forth to your pinball machine to test every little change you make when you can do it in seconds from your PC. So, using PinSound studio, you install your orchestration(s), select your psrec file to use, select the orchestration you want to use, the press play. The software then visually crawls through the recorded event sequence, and you hear what your orchestration will sound like in real-time game play. You can see which sound file fires for which event and for what duration, which gives you critical information when designing specific game sounds.
    5. A PinSound Community Account | You will want to register for a free http://pinsound-community.org account. Here you can download psrec files, default orchestrations for your pin, and custom orchestrations that others have posted. Just to be clear PinSound DOES NOT SHIP WITH SOUND FILES. I'm sure this is due to licensing constraints, so it is up to you to find/make your own sound files. While there is a methodology using a virtual pinball platform, I did not go that route and such is beyond the scope of this post. Also, not all pins have psrec files or orchestrations available. This is still a new product although it has been on the market for a few years. It is a combination of an enthusiasts designed, developed, and manufactured hardware solution along with a community supported sound development solution.
    6. Your Pin's Default Sound Library | For most pins you will find this under the "Downloads" tab on the PinSound Community forum. Pins are listed by category, so you simply find yours, click on the appropriate link, agree that you own the pin, and download the zip file. By default, the zip file will contain everything you need but the audio file format will be OGG. I don't really know what this is other than a highly compressed audio format, but PinSound requires WAV files to work - sort of. If you want to develop your own orchestrations then you will need to work with WAV files. This requires that you convert the OGG files using the tool listed below. However, if you just want to play what others have already developed and not do any customizations, then no conversion is required. You simply copy the ZIP file you download to the provided USB driver, insert into your PinSound Board, turn you pin on and the PinSound will extract and convert the files as needed. Be prepared to wait as this can take 30 minutes or more for the first time. After the initial sound file installation, the PinSound may take 10-20 seconds upon each reboot of the pin before it is ready to go (it provided audible feedback so you know what is going on).
    7. FRE:AC (Free Audio Converter) | If you are going to create your own customer orchestration then you will need this. You will use this tool to initially convert the entire contents of the orchestration structure that you download from OGG files to WAV files. This is crucial because this structure will contain every folder, sound file, and naming convention that is required for you to create your own orchestration. In other words, you will use the default sound structure as a template to your reorchestration. You only have to do this once per orchestration file that you download, and there is a good write-up on this process. To download click here: http://www.freac.org/index.php/en/downloads-mainmenu-33, and to see a walk-thru of the process, visit here: https://www.pinsound.org/sound-conversion.
    8. Audacity | This is a powerful free audio editing tool available at http://www.audacityteam.org. I'm not going to go into step-by-step how to use the tool (although I will give a little more detail later on), but you can use this to do everything you need with sound files for the purposes of PinSound. In my case here is everything I used the tool for: capturing audio sounds and effects I wanted from various online playing, trimming and splicing audio files for content and length purposes, converting sound files to stereo, and exporting sound files to correct WAV format. While there is some art to mixing audio, for our basic purposes most anyone can do it with a little knowledge and practice. Pleas familiarize yourself with the software by accessing the online manual and watching YouTube videos.
    9. Audacity Nyquist Effect Plug-ins | Audacity already has a ton of features and filters build in that you will use including normalization, fade outs, etc. However, it also supports plugins to achieve additional effects. The one additional plug I utilized was the Pseudo-Stereo effect. This allows you to take files that were originally mono, and create two channels with distinct waves (e.g. not just two identical mono channels). This is a free plugin that can be obtained here: http://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/Nyquist_Effect_Plug-ins
    INSTALLATION
    - Hardware & Connections
    - Speaker considerations & wiring diagram
    - Audio Adjustments & Tweaking Sound (dials & settings)
    HOW TO GET PINSOUND WORKING ON YOUR PIN
    - USB Drive
    - Default Orchestration
    - Patience
    HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN ORCHESTRATION
    - Acquiring sounds
    - Mixing sounds
    - Applying stereo effect
    - Sound duration
    - File formats
    - Folder Structure
    - To Convert to OGG or not
    - Testing on your PC (need .psrec files)
    ODDS & ENDS
    - Headphones (installation, options)
    - Multiple Orchestrations Available
    - PinSound Forums
    - Config Files

    Nice but waaaaaay to complicated for me.

    #6 3 years ago
    Quoted from MustangPaul:

    Nice but waaaaaay to complicated for me.

    Installing the board is dead easy - this is more like the "how do I get maximum benefit" guide.

    Benefits of the board in general are better separation of cab and backbox speakers, the opportunity for stereo sound and bass/treble management. Even with the crappy factory speakers there's a big improvement.

    I love this board. And I keep posting this every chance I get. And the brothers have YET to send me a free one. The nerve!!

    #7 3 years ago

    Thanks for starting this thread. It's hard to find comprehensive information about PinSound, especially for people new to it.

    #8 3 years ago
    Quoted from MustangPaul:

    Nice but waaaaaay to complicated for me.

    Doesn't have to be. Four screws, a couple of cables, download my mix (or any other you like) and you are ready to go. Well, also run the speaker harness, but that is easy.

    #9 3 years ago
    Quoted from pinwillie:

    Great write up !!
    I'll be following
    I am now considering PinSound for my Getaway
    What speakers did you upgrade too?
    I read that stock speakers will work as well
    I'm sure there is a benefit to changing them out Right?

    I need to lookup what I bought, but was based upon a very early post in the Getaway thread. Stock speakers will work, but for very little you can get better range and bass. Mine were trashed, so it was a no brained. Also, I will be replacing my right speaker with same size/type as left that will require a little modding in my case since current right speaker is smaller.

    #10 3 years ago
    Quoted from Rdoyle1978:

    Wow! Thanks - I was an early supporter of PinSound and even I_ didn't realise you needed to find additional psrec files. I was off to the races with my TZ and have just been using the original DCS sounds , but recently added another one and have been getting into creating custom sound schemes for my DW
    Another phenomenal edit suite is called "Reaper" and is only $50. It's as full-featured as Adobe Audition/CoolEditPro but better IMO. I like the interface a tad bit more than Audacity too

    Great post. My intent here is not to be the sole authority, but to give a comprehensive overview from by experience. Other options, ideas, and opinions are always welcome.

    Doubt that I can spend more time today, but hopefully in the next week or so I can fill in the outline.

    #11 3 years ago
    Quoted from pinwillie:

    Great write up !!
    I'll be following
    I am now considering PinSound for my Getaway
    What speakers did you upgrade too?
    I read that stock speakers will work as well
    I'm sure there is a benefit to changing them out Right?

    Here is what I got from http://partsexpress.com

    #295-306- Dayton DC160S0-8 6.5" woofer (cabinet)
    #267-080 - Pyle PL53BL Blue Label 5-1/4" Triaxial Speaker Pair (left side)
    #267-770 - Pyle Wave PLX32 3-1/2" Coaxial Speaker Pair (right side)

    When I bought these, the cost including shipping totaled $63. I actually have an extra new woofer that I would sell you, but with shipping may be close Parts Express price.

    You must buy the speakers in pairs, and the 3-1/2" is limted so I'm going to use my other 5-1/4" to replace it.

    2 weeks later
    #12 3 years ago

    Where can you find detailed information about firmware updates? I notice there is a recent one, but would like more information:

    Version 0090 – 21 Apr. 2017

    New: support new enhanced sound package
    New: secondary output support
    Improved: shaker support
    Improved: Whitestar startup audio engine
    Improved: older Data East audio engine compatibility
    Improved: Gottlieb volume
    New: Gottlieb Sys80 / Sys80A / Sys80B audio engine
    New: enhanced sound package configuration
    Improved: Whitestar volume
    New: CPU engine auto-detection override
    Fixed: Whitestar auto-detection
    Improved: custom rules
    Improved: Data-East volume
    Improved: System-11 volume
    Improved: sound packages unzipping / installation
    New: SEGA / STERN Whitestar audio engine
    Improved: link with Visual Pinball audio engine

    Like what is secondary output support? enhanced sound package?

    #13 3 years ago

    Well, I don't have a good answer for that. It seems that the 2 bros don't always take the time to document in detail. I know they have full time jobs in addition to this project, and seems like doing is more of a priority than documenting.

    #14 3 years ago

    Tantrum - do you know how to raise/lower volume on an entire set of sounds? e.g. 'voice' or 'jingle'? I know you can do it in PS Studio but I can't figure out where those settings get saved so I can inspect it.

    #15 3 years ago

    Well, I normalized all of my original files in Audacity so haven't had to mess with this.

    However, I assume that you would utilize gain files to achieve what you want. Not sure if you can use one in the root of a folder or if you need one in every single sound file folder. Seems hard to find info on gain format and values

    Try created a "gain.txt" file and put it in the root folder of the sound type you wish to adjust (e.g. "voice" or "jingle"). Inside the file, from what I can infer you just type a numeric value between 1-20 (e.g. "10", "15", "20", etc.) I assume the higher the number, the higher the gain (e.g. sound amplitude). I also read somewhere that 10 is the standard setting, so maybe sub 10 lowers the gain? It is my impression that if you make these adjustments in PinSoound studio that it creates this file for you, but I've only read and not confirmed that.

    I also found another note on an "undocumented" feature called ducking that you may want to try where you impact how everything relates volume wise to the music (don't know if this still works or not). Here is the link to that: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/pinsound-tz#post-2378741

    #16 3 years ago
    Quoted from Mr_Tantrum:

    Well, I normalized all of my original files in Audacity so haven't had to mess with this.
    However, I assume that you would utilize gain files to achieve what you want. Not sure if you can use one in the root of a folder or if you need one in every single sound file folder. Seems hard to find info on gain format and values
    Try created a "gain.txt" file and put it in the root folder of the sound type you wish to adjust (e.g. "voice" or "jingle"). Inside the file, from what I can infer you just type a numeric value between 1-20 (e.g. "10", "15", "20", etc.) I assume the higher the number, the higher the gain (e.g. sound amplitude). I also read somewhere that 10 is the standard setting, so maybe sub 10 lowers the gain? It is my impression that if you make these adjustments in PinSoound studio that it creates this file for you, but I've only read and not confirmed that.
    I also found another note on an "undocumented" feature called ducking that you may want to try where you impact how everything relates volume wise to the music (don't know if this still works or not). Here is the link to that: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/pinsound-tz#post-2378741

    Yep thanks, I had found the posts about ducking so have tried that (not sure if I'm doing it wrong or if it's not working yet but it did not have an effect)

    I'll try putting the gain file in each folder, there is no way I'm doing it for each .wav

    I normalized my files as well but I'm trying audio from different sources and may have to add some compression to get everything tweaked, but for now - even the original speech files are way too low in the mix, you really can't hear most of what is being said so i need a global fix. I'm trying to update the callouts to include all 12 doctors (eventually); right now I just have 9, 10 and 11 in there

    3 months later
    #17 3 years ago

    Added a few updates to the guide. Still have much to flesh out, just been really busy and on other projects. I'm happy to integrate info from other contributors.

    #18 3 years ago

    Thanks for posting this great guide.

    2 weeks later
    #19 3 years ago

    Mr_Tantrum thanks for the information. I have a Getaway machine and after listening to some of the orchestrations you have created, they pushed me over the edge and I have now purchased the Pinsound card. Just waiting on shipping.

    I have read the guide and I am ready to go

    #20 3 years ago

    Glad to hear. You are going to love it! Are you upgrading speakers and wiring for stereo?

    #21 3 years ago

    Anyone attempt adding PinSound to Whitestar yet? How was the experience? Definitely looks like a more complicated installation.

    #22 3 years ago
    Quoted from FlippyD:

    Anyone attempt adding PinSound to Whitestar yet? How was the experience? Definitely looks like a more complicated installation.

    I've seen several posts asking about it, but I don't think I've seen anyone giving their experience of doing it. Not to say its not out there, but info is slow coming.

    #23 3 years ago

    I'll be putting it in my LOTR, which also has an LED OCD in it. It's a tight fit but I've seen a picture of it so definitely possible. Will shime in when I get around to it.

    2 weeks later
    #24 3 years ago

    It's nice to see a support thread for Pinsound. While the sound board is a good product, support is GREATLY lacking.

    I've posted this else where on Pinside, but it just gets lost in the shuffle.

    I've almost finished my ultimate mix for STTNG. But, the game over music never stops. It fades out, but then goes to full volume after the fade and plays until the silence timer kicks in. Kind of annoying. I've tested it with other people's mixes for STTNG and the same thing.

    I never had any trouble like this with all the Doctor Who mixes I created. Is this a DCS issue or something?

    #25 3 years ago

    Personally, I've only done mixes for my Getaway (Williams), albeit several of them. Also, I've used another custom mix from a member for Jurassic Park (Data East). Neither of these have what I think you are describing. Does the same thing happen if you record a normal game and then simulate with your orchestration in Pinsound Studio?

    #26 3 years ago
    Quoted from pinballshark:

    It's nice to see a support thread for Pinsound. While the sound board is a good product, support is GREATLY lacking.
    I've posted this else where on Pinside, but it just gets lost in the shuffle.
    I've almost finished my ultimate mix for STTNG. But, the game over music never stops. It fades out, but then goes to full volume after the fade and plays until the silence timer kicks in. Kind of annoying. I've tested it with other people's mixes for STTNG and the same thing.
    I never had any trouble like this with all the Doctor Who mixes I created. Is this a DCS issue or something?

    There are fewer DCS mixes than data east or WPC89 games - this may be some kind of weird bug, but given that WPc-S games
    Do not exhibit the same bug, im inclined to think maybe there's something else going on.

    #27 3 years ago

    I've installed these boards on LAH, JP, and IJ for clients without issue. I'll record a game and run it through Pinsound Studio and see if I can notice anything. Thanks for the tip.

    #28 3 years ago

    I fixed it. There was a missing sound file that was used to mute the sound at end game (basically). The sound bug is actually in the legacy sound mix for STTNG. I posted on Pinsound's site about it.

    Here's a link:
    http://pinsound-community.org/forum/index.php?/topic/175-sttng-game-over-music-wont-stop-looping/

    #29 3 years ago
    Quoted from pinballshark:

    I fixed it. There was a missing sound file that was used to mute the sound at end game (basically). The sound bug is actually in the legacy sound mix for STTNG. I posted on Pinsound's site about it.
    Here's a link:
    http://pinsound-community.org/forum/index.php?/topic/175-sttng-game-over-music-wont-stop-looping/

    Since you posted this, I started going over my TZ remix again, and found a .wav under "single" that sounded remarkably like what you posted. So you're saying it plays the game over music repeatedly, but the original sound board would play another sound that would cut it off intentionally?

    #30 3 years ago

    That's how it appears. I'm not actually sure what the DCS board is doing with this event, but it solved the issue.

    I tested the silence.wav file in the music, sfx, single and voice directories and got the same result in the game. If I made it a Jingle, it would interrupt what was playing and caused silence where there shouldn't be.

    In STTNG, it (sound 220) was also used immediately after every mode jingle as a pause of some kind and was also triggered during it. It was clear an additional sound wasn't meant to be played at that time. As I watch it in Pinsound Studio, it only seems useful at the very end to stop the end game music after the fade out.

    #31 3 years ago

    Great detective work. Thanks for sharing your resolution.

    1 week later
    #32 3 years ago

    I guess I've been looking in the wrong spot for Pinsound tech support. While the Pinsound Community site is a little quiet, there is more activity here:

    https://qa.pinsound.org/

    #33 3 years ago

    Thanks for the link. I've not seen this before.

    #35 3 years ago

    That I like!

    2 months later
    #36 2 years ago

    FYI, just updated initial post with videos of my various Getaway PinSound mixes.

    1 week later
    #37 2 years ago

    These are awesome Chris!

    #38 2 years ago

    Glad you like them, and I hope they help people realize the potential of PinSound. Just wish my mic was better to do it real justice.

    #39 2 years ago

    I see Mr_Tantrum you've got 5 mixes. How does Pinsound determine which mix is the primary/default?
    I'd like to control which mix it boots to initially.

    #40 2 years ago
    Quoted from Reznnate:

    I see Mr_Tantrum you've got 5 mixes. How does Pinsound determine which mix is the primary/default?
    I'd like to control which mix it boots to initially.

    It will remember your selection after you change it. I believe the one with the first alphabetical folder name will be chosen if there is no previous selection

    #41 2 years ago
    Quoted from Reznnate:

    I see Mr_Tantrum you've got 5 mixes. How does Pinsound determine which mix is the primary/default?
    I'd like to control which mix it boots to initially.

    By default it will take the folders in order (see my initial post for folder examples). From there, it always remembers your last mix selected, even after power off.

    #42 2 years ago

    We just installed one of these in LOTR and all I can say is wow it was amazing with the latest remix done by a pinsider. I never really liked LOTR but that mix made me feel more immersed in the game. We wired the speakers in 2.1 and it sounds amazing. I have one in my World Cup Soccer but the custom remix on the pinsound site is not exactly seemless. I will be working on customizing my own thanks to this guide. I want to buy one for my BSD and Funhouse. I also want to get a getaway now so I can add one of these boards to it.

    #43 2 years ago
    Quoted from cyroute:

    We just installed one of these in LOTR and all I can say is wow it was amazing with the latest remix done by a pinsider. I never really liked LOTR but that mix made me feel more immersed in the game. We wired the speakers in 2.1 and it sounds amazing. I have one in my World Cup Soccer but the custom remix on the pinsound site is not exactly seemless. I will be working on customizing my own thanks to this guide. I want to buy one for my BSD and Funhouse. I also want to get a getaway now so I can add one of these boards to it.

    I’ve never done drugs, but can’t imagine they are half as addicting as PinSound!

    2 weeks later
    #44 2 years ago

    Just added my 8th custom Pinsound orchestration for the Getaway. Posted on Pinsound forum (approval TBD), and put a video on YouTube of game play (see initial post).

    #45 2 years ago

    Hi!
    Working om my Frankenstein these days. Now, some of the sounds from the game is simply not present on the legacy mix I downloaded from pinsound.org.

    In pinsound studio, I can see it trigger sounds that are reported as missing files. Do you know how to make a folder belonging to the missing files? The code after missing files don't seem to resemble the normal folder codes... ,

    #46 2 years ago
    Quoted from Hazzard:

    Hi!
    Working om my Frankenstein these days. Now, some of the sounds from the game is simply not present on the legacy mix I downloaded from pinsound.org.
    In pinsound studio, I can see it trigger sounds that are reported as missing files. Do you know how to make a folder belonging to the missing files? The code after missing files don't seem to resemble the normal folder codes... ,

    That is a good question as I know Pinsound studio matches a psrec file to an orchestration you already have. I think what you have to do is to somehow extract/download the original sound ROM of the pin. A quick search led me to this (I've not tried this myself): https://www.pinsound.org/sounds-rom-file-extraction.

    You can get the ROM you are looking from here (I think this is what you want): http://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=947. Download the 2 MB zip file titled ROMs under the ROMs section. Unzip and there is a text file that tells you what each ROM file is. From there it looks like you can use the other tools listed to see the identity of all the sound events. After that, you just need to create an appropriately named folder and filename.

    Sounds like some work and discovery, so please let us know how it goes for you. Sorry I am not much help since I've never done it, but intriguing process.

    #47 2 years ago
    Quoted from Mr_Tantrum:

    Just added my 8th custom Pinsound orchestration for the Getaway. Posted on Pinsound forum (approval TBD), and put a video on YouTube of game play (see initial post).

    Awesome! Though if you're going to go grunge, Offspring seems appropriate.

    #48 2 years ago
    Quoted from Mr_Tantrum:

    That is a good question as I know Pinsound studio matches a psrec file to an orchestration you already have. I think what you have to do is to somehow extract/download the original sound ROM of the pin. A quick search led me to this (I've not tried this myself): https://www.pinsound.org/sounds-rom-file-extraction.
    You can get the ROM you are looking from here (I think this is what you want): http://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=947. Download the 2 MB zip file titled ROMs under the ROMs section. Unzip and there is a text file that tells you what each ROM file is. From there it looks like you can use the other tools listed to see the identity of all the sound events. After that, you just need to create an appropriately named folder and filename.
    Sounds like some work and discovery, so please let us know how it goes for you. Sorry I am not much help since I've never done it, but intriguing process.

    Thanks a lot for the direction :-) Will do some research and post here if Im successful.

    #49 2 years ago

    I just installed a PinSound board on CFTBL, and it's a game changer...literally!

    I realize that I do need to upgrade from the factory speakers ASAP!
    Can I just get a speaker kit or do I need a harness to rewire it for 2.1 as well?

    I'd like to go pick something up from Pinball Life today(Flipper Fidelity) if they have what I need in stock.

    #50 2 years ago
    Quoted from Mtg381:

    Can I just get a speaker kit or do I need a harness to rewire it for 2.1 as well?

    The speaker kit that Pinsound sells directly includes the harness. Aftermarket speakers like FF probably wouldn't. It would be easy/straightforward to put together a harness with a little wire and a .156" connector w/ trifurcon crimp terminals you could get from PBL.

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