Tahiti TILT issue

(Topic ID: 212665)

Tahiti TILT issue


By slawnski

5 months ago



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  • 27 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 months ago by slawnski
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#1 5 months ago

Just picked up a very nice example of Tahiti- worked at the old owners place just fine- got it to my office and set it up. the machine is tilted and will not start a game. tilt mechanism is free and floating fine.

tilt light is on- I add a quarter, it racks up 4 credits. Hit the start button and the tray under cabinet slides-(maybe this happened when I added the credits not so sure now) tilt light still on and one credit is deducted- no ball is fed to the shooting lane. TILT light is still on. I'm a bit befuddled. Any suggestions?

All plugs look to be seated correctly-

#2 5 months ago

I'll assume the tilt plumb bob is not stuck making contact.

Open it up, get a ball out and manually feed it to the shooter lane after "starting" a game. If that does not clear it, look for a ball or three stuck on the ball tray below the playfield.

#3 5 months ago

One (additional now, I think) issue I will need to contend with is the clear plastic switch spacer on the tilt relay- the end is broken off- I'll try some CA for a quick fix till I can source another one-

apart from the tilt bob- what are the other anti-cheat features/ where are they located? manually opening the tilt relay gets a ball to lift- but there is still something triggering the tilt relay. I'm done for the night- headed home. Since the machine is at my office I'm done tinkering for the evening- Thanks in advance for any help you guys can lend- and if anybody has a spare clear spacer for the relay that they would like to sell- please let me know!

#4 5 months ago
Quoted from MrBally:

I'll assume the tilt plumb bob is not stuck making contact.
Open it up, get a ball out and manually feed it to the shooter lane after "starting" a game. If that does not clear it, look for a ball or three stuck on the ball tray below the playfield.

"stuck" as in not in line and in the middle of the tray? I'll have a looksee

#5 5 months ago

all balls in the tray-

#6 5 months ago

Tilt plumb bob is not making contact...

#7 5 months ago

Fix that Tilt relay spacer. Temporary fix: put paper/business card, 3x5 card stock etc. between each contact that is staying closed due to the broken plastic.

If this doesn't work, crack out the game wiring diagram (buy one if you don't have it) and figure out what is holding the Tilt relay in. My Tahiti is not accessible right now.

Tilt switches are on the coin door, in the head and, IIRC, on the main cabinet floor.

Also be sure the coin switches are not stuck and are fully at rest. Confirm with continuity tester and door unplugged.

#8 5 months ago

The tilt relay spacer broke at the last slot. It still functions but I like the idea of the Card stock to get the switch stack to act Un-tripped. I’ll try that in the morning. The coin door switch has been spaced open so it no longer functions. The bob has been disabled. What is IIRC? I don’t see anything in the head, or on the main cabinet floor but will look again tomorrow. What will the tilt sensor in the head look like? I sort of know my way around EM’s and I have schematics. Didn’t see anything that looked like it was placed there to stop the game from functioning if doors are opened, or if the game even has such things in place.

#9 5 months ago

IIRC
If I Recall Correctly.

They are slam switches. A set of contacts with a weight on the longer blade.

#10 5 months ago

Thank you. I’ll look for these tomorrow.

#11 5 months ago

All tilt switches are ok / not tripped/ open. I repaired the plastic stack spacer on the tilt relay- going to run through the schematics when I have some time to see if I can trace why the game is calling to tilt. Any advice is appreciated. As I was looking for and testing tilt mechanisms I did find quite the pile of contacts and assorted nick-nacks in the cabinet. Mostly new some used. I could have a loose contact that landed in a switch stack somewhere. May have happened when we moved the game and or got it set up again.

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#12 5 months ago

I tested the tilt switches on the cabinet, in the head, and the tilt bob with a meter- All are showing continuity on either side of their switched- physically opened switches- (did that make sense?) Physically the switch is open but I'm still getting continuity.

Digging into the schematics now- I am not so great at this part of the journey (reading schematics) yet....

#13 5 months ago

Check inside the cabinet at the come back key mech. I am thinking that IIRC there is a connection.

#14 5 months ago

There are three (3) paths that energize the TILT relay that I see.
Try to isolate one path at a time by inserting an insolating spacer. ( thin cardboard/paper).
It seems like something was jarred when you moved it.
Maybe its that ' Key switch'....... what ever that is, as stated above.
See attachments.

ScreenHunter_77 Mar. 22 07.14 (resized).jpg

ScreenHunter_76 Mar. 22 07.07 (resized).jpg

#15 5 months ago

Key switch is located on the left side of the cabinet, in the front 1/3.

Alignment of each of these switches is critical.

#16 5 months ago
Quoted from bingopodcast:

Key switch is located on the left side of the cabinet, in the front 1/3.
Alignment of each of these switches is critical.

When were they installed on Bingos ?
now that you OWN IT, I would say You don't need it anymore!

#17 5 months ago

It's kind of a relay - they were installed in the mid-60s starting around the time the 20 holers came into being. They are used for quickly adding credits back onto the machine.

Player hits big, but the bar owner doesn't have the cash to pay them. In that case, they could 'come back' (it's called the kumbackey) and present their IOU to get the credits back on the machine. Pretty neat idea, along with the separate cash box/diverter.

Unfortunately, the keys are almost always missing, and many of the games I work on have those switches out of alignment from multiple moves. One switch basically releases the replay cams index and another shuts off power to the rest of the game.

The cam itself provides pressure on the switches in the default position, and it needs to be tight.

#18 5 months ago

So it would be a good idea to DISABLE it ???
Is this it ?

ScreenHunter_78 Mar. 22 13.08 (resized).jpg

#19 5 months ago

I don't - I just make sure they are adjusted properly. But I like keeping things original where possible. You can always replace the lock itself if you wanted to, and didn't have the key.

Edit: yes, that's the kumbackey mech.

#20 5 months ago

I do have that assembly and the key- the assembly is "loose" as in the tab on the lock is able to flop side to side a bit making contact with the assembly that is on the head side of the cabinet. In the locked/play mode should the lock tab be in contact with the switch assembly on either side (head or player switches) ?

#21 5 months ago

There should be a plastic 'ladder' that the switches fall into. The lock tab hits that. There should be pressure applied to the ladder during normal operation. The switches themselves should change state if the lock tab were to swivel. Make sure that they change state completely if the key is turned and removed in the lock position.

#22 5 months ago

ok- I have that exact state re: lock tab- pressure is applied to the ladder during it's at rest.

I disconnected the coil wire for the tilt circuit. I can now start a game.... the cowards way out, but trouble for another time.

One quarter gives me 4 credits. I cannot add credits to the counter with additional coins unless I run that counter down to 0- this is normal? I would have thought adding multiple coins would add to the counter up until whatever is determined to be the most credits allowed is reached. Maybe that is 4 here?

I will need to re-lamp the head - just to be sure that I'm aware of features as I dump more quarters / credits in. I appreciate all the help and I am a bit letdown that I took the measure that I did to get a game started....

now I just need to learn how to play it....

#23 5 months ago

Yep! That keeps you from sticking in money when you have money already. Kind of a nice feature that many operators cut out - but there is a coil called the coin lockout behind the coin mech that will auto-return coins to you if there are credits on the meter.

Quoted from slawnski:

I appreciate all the help and I am a bit letdown that I took the measure that I did to get a game started....

We are here for you when you are ready to connect it back and troubleshoot.

Quoted from slawnski:

now I just need to learn how to play it....

Playing comes in phases -
1) Coin phase or betting phase - insert coin / play red button to start a new game. Balls dump to trough. First ball lifts to shooter lane.
Continue playing red button until you have the odds/features lit that you wish.
2) Playing phase - shoot the balls to try to get 3/4/5 in a single colored section. The 20 hole games have something called 'star zones'. These numbers don't count as part of the greater colored section until you have the other 4 lit in that section. They are used independently for the star zone scoring features. In order to assist the player, a feature called Mystic Lines exists on Tahiti. By pressing A/B/C (if lit and before the game locks you out of the feature [4th or 5th ball]), you can physically shift the bingo card numbers around on the backglass! Very neat. Tahiti also has a Ball Return feature. This will allow you to return one whole set of balls back to you to replay with no penalty, in case you didn't make the 'hit' that you wanted.
3) Scoring phase - finished shooting and nudging and panting trying to get that 5 in a section? Assuming you have 3 or more in a section (not counting star zones) or a set of star zones lit with the feature, you can press the R button to collect your winnings. These are applied to the replay register directly. Wait for the credits to rack and then you can press the red button to start a new game (see #1).

#24 5 months ago

Thank you! Played a bunch this morning- not exactly easy to get a win....

#25 5 months ago
Quoted from slawnski:

ok- I have that exact state re: lock tab- pressure is applied to the ladder during it's at rest.
I disconnected the coil wire for the tilt circuit. I can now start a game.... the cowards way out, but trouble for another time.
One quarter gives me 4 credits. I cannot add credits to the counter with additional coins unless I run that counter down to 0- this is normal? I would have thought adding multiple coins would add to the counter up until whatever is determined to be the most credits allowed is reached. Maybe that is 4 here?
I will need to re-lamp the head - just to be sure that I'm aware of features as I dump more quarters / credits in. I appreciate all the help and I am a bit letdown that I took the measure that I did to get a game started....
now I just need to learn how to play it....

How to play a bingo pinball machine and make numbered holes for in line payouts.

Well, how can you describe in words how to make a numbered hole on a bingo pinball playfield to connect for in line wins especially the "bally hole" number 16. The 16 is one of the harder numbers to make, but there are also many other tough numbers to make like the 4, 15, or 17 to name a few which to me are just as hard to make as the 16.

First of all there is no secret or magic trick to making the numbered holes you need. The best thing any player can do is play a bingo pinball machine everyday or as much as you can to give yourself a chance to get a feel for the way the ball rolls around through that "maze like field" of numbered holes on a bingo playfield. The foundation of a "stance and style" is important too. I hold the cabinet with my two hands tightly gripping the wood or metal side rails
starting at the top of the playfield after shooting a ball from the ball shooter lane. Then quickly when needed sliding my hands downwards when the ball moves downwards on the playfield, but always keeping my hands even with the ball as it travels downwards.

Example: If I am trying to make the number 23 my hands will end up at the bottom of the playfield after being on the top and middle of the playfield as the ball travels down i find that i have more control of the ball when my are hands "horizontally" even with the location of the ball on the playfield, making it easier to try to make the ball go where i want it to go. I also have my left thigh wedged under the front of the cabinet below the coin door at all times while the ball is in play too. This helps me a great deal for balance and comfort as part of my stance and style and i can nudge the machine with my thigh. I always crouch down some until I am comfortable, plus I am bent over forward leaning down towards the playfield leaving only 8" from my eyes to the playfield glass for that feeling of becoming part of the machine and always concentrating very hard with every move the ball makes. You know the old saying practice makes perfect and you will need plenty of time in on a bingo pinball to make some of the numbers! you need for a in line wins or hits. Hit is a term use by bingo players for collecting wins or replays for in line or numbered lights in a row on a backglass bingo card.

Being a serious bingo player/gambler on these magnificent games of luck and skill for about 40+ years growing up trying to make a living off of them as a kid and playing mostly everyday I am no expert, but the 16 can be made several ways if the playfield is correctly shopped out. Before I explain how to make the 16 or any other numbered hole the first tip and most important I can give in playing a bingo pinball is to only and I mean only, shake the machine when you need to move the ball in your favor towards a numbered hole or away from a number you do not need. Nudging is the key to learning how to make a numbered hole and becoming a great player. It's like any other game that is new to you.

To understand when to shake and when not to shake requires the person to learn this by themselves from getting a feel for playing a bingo on their own. The way I play is I only shake when I need to, carefully watching the ball at all times and always ready to shake in a split second if needed. When playing a bingo pinball you must be very focused and you need strong concentration while the ball is in the playfield heading for a numbered hole. Sometime you need to make the ball take it's natural path only shaking it away from all numbered holes except the numbers you need to make in order to get a hit. This will come when a new or novice player has dedicated some time each day to play and study the natural path of how the silver ball rolls. Once you have reached a "fair" to "good" level for playing a bingo you are now ready to look for the common rolls for making the 16 or any numbered hole on the playfield.

Here we go. First always shoot the ball on the correct side of the playfield! The correct side will be the side which you have a better chance of making the numbered hole you need for a in line win, you do this by following your blockers. Blockers are the balls already shot out that are now sitting in a numbered hole. By controlling the ball in play and making the ball in play hit another dead ball that is already in a numbered hole you give yourself a better chance to make it to the 16 or any other number you need before dropping in a unwanted hole. Blockers are a important part in making the numbers you need. Getting the ball near the numbered 16 hole is the first thing on the list to do. Using your blockers and being on the correct side of the playfield will give you a chance at making the 16 or any other numbered hole you may need.

Lets identify and label the 5 bumper posts that are just above the third row of numbers 14,15,16,17,18. We will label the 5 posts from left to right A,B,C,D,E. One of the most common ways the ball goes in the numbered 16 hole is by getting the ball between the B & C post or C & D post. Once the ball is there you can watch it closely and not choose to shake or and take your chances of the ball going into the 16 on it's own or when the ball is there you can shake the ball side to side gently between post B & C or C & D which ever two post you have the ball at and then watching it closely just as the ball is hitting post B or C for the last time is when you stop shaking side to side and try to allow the ball to drop into the 16 hole.

A lot really depends on if the bingo machine playfield is shopped correctly in the players favor for making the numbered holes you need for winning. Having good rubbers on the posts is a must for starters. Most operators would have dead rubbers throughout the playfield posts and the tilt set very sensitive so the player wouldn't be able to control the ball at all therefore taking away a players skill for making his numbers needed to win. This condition of the playfield could not give the player the best opportunity to make numbers for pay outs which allows the operators to make a fortune in cash from players losing all the time.

I used to put a empty soda can behind the machine in the center top section of the backbox and have a friend or partner I was playing with push the machine forward so I could wedge the soda can in between the wall and the backbox. By doing this it would give the machine some stiffness and wouldn't allow the tilt bob to move/swing as much when trying to shake the machine to make a number, therefore giving back some advantage to the player for winning. This helped me a great deal, but some bingo players hated it and would pull the machine backwards towards them allowing the soda can to drop down to the floor. I knew this because I would find the soda can on the floor under the machine and have seen them do it after I got off the machine. If I wanted to play again I would have to set back up the soda can trick, which always wasn't easy to do with the owner of the of the place watching you as much of the time as he did. There are other things players used to do to rig the games in their favor but operators and store owners didn't like it, but it was always all right for them to rig the machines against the players all the time.

#26 5 months ago
Quoted from slawnski:

Played a bunch this morning- not exactly easy to get a win....

As Vic mentions in his excellent writeup, you have to get a feel for the machine. I find on the 20 holers that I can typically get a good hit in the green section.

Blue is also pretty good if I mess up the green.

#27 5 months ago

Holy crap! This can really be addicting- maybe I shouldn't have set this up at work.... Thanks for the post Vic! time to work on my technique

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