(Topic ID: 133238)

System 80 question

By jhanley

6 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 9 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 6 years ago by blownfuse
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

You

Linked Games

#1 6 years ago

Someone I know has a Haunted House that has been sitting for 20 years without turning it on.What would you have to do to start it up?Just turn it on and see what happens?

#2 6 years ago

If you are buying it, nope. Point out the battery leakage, the old yellow cab cap and pay dirt for it.

If you plan on keeping it, look to see if it still has the black NiCad mounted on it (it probably does) and look around said battery for alkaline damage. If it is a mess, don't bother turning it on until its been repaired. If it looks clean, go for it, turn it on.

Then plan on doing ALL the mods (ground, VUK kicker, new yellow cap, etc,,,) to make to bulletproof.

#3 6 years ago

If it has alkaline damage then what? What would it cost for a new board?Are there any others things that could be wrong?How much would the machine be worth if he sold it the way it is?

#4 6 years ago

All in one type replacement board is 350ish, but cheaper non-all in one replacements are available. If the game was very very nice other than the boards I'd say up to 2k - but it likely has some playfield and cab wear here an there which would move it down to $1000 +/-depending on condition of glass, plastics, etc.

#5 6 years ago

And if the damage is minimal, Great Plains Electronics sells a repair kit that contains a few of the normally affected components, if you know how to properly run a soldering iron.

#6 6 years ago

You also might get lucky--I've obtained a few machines were the NiCad's had not yet started to leak.

I wouldn't even try turning it on until thoroughly going through the electrical system first, checking the wiring for damage or missing insulation, and making sure all the fuses are the correct values, and checking the bridge rectifiers. Then, I would disconnect all the boards and check voltages. Then the power supply. Then the MPU with just the coin door switches and displays. Then the driver board (without connecting the playfield connectors). Then the sound boards. Then the switches, lamps, and solenoids separately. Make sure to turn off the power each time when you are plugging/unplugging stuff.

Quoted from btw75:

All in one type replacement board is 350ish, but cheaper non-all in one replacements are available. If the game was very very nice other than the boards I'd say up to 2k - but it likely has some playfield and cab wear here an there which would move it down to $1000 +/-depending on condition of glass, plastics, etc.

I would probably go up to $500-$800 for an untested BH game that looks decent. Or, maybe $900-$1200 for a mostly working one, but unshopped. I probably wouldn't hesitate to grab it if the seller was asking $200-$400.

#7 6 years ago

Thanks for the information.System 80 pins sound a little bit like a nightmare.I don't know if I would want to mess with this.

#8 6 years ago

Once all the mods are done to it, they will run for a long long time. A few hundred dollars and a bit of soldering and you could enjoy it for years besides cleaning and rubbers

#9 6 years ago

They really aren't that different "problem wise" from any other game from that era. Each manufacturer has it's own issues and there is documentation to bullet proof all of them. Gottlieb's main issue is connector related, once you get past that and have it running, keeping it running is a piece of cake as long as you don't do something dumb like work on it with the power on.

Steve
System 80, not just a job, it's an adventure

Quoted from jhanley:

Thanks for the information.System 80 pins sound a little bit like a nightmare.I don't know if I would want to mess with this.

Hey there! Got a moment?

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside