(Topic ID: 38423)

Stripped screw holes under playfield, wood putty?


By Kingoftron

6 years ago



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  • 45 posts
  • 31 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by Deckmanmark
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

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#1 6 years ago

One of the fixtures under my TZ fell off last night and after trying to screw it back on, the holes are totally stripped. What's the best way to fix this kind of issue? Wood putty? Toothpicks? Just got this thing working properly, so of course the holes are now the issue.

#2 6 years ago

I use wood glue and toothpicks. Just dip the toothpick in the glue, stick it in the hole and break it off - works great!

#3 6 years ago

I use toothpicks works great.

#4 6 years ago

I use tooth picks and wood glue. Apply glue to tooth picks cram as many as you can get to go in or whiddle wood to size and glue in, wait a day or two then screw in.

#5 6 years ago

Yeah I would use toothpicks and glue, or use 1/8" dowels cut to length and glue. Use a sharp chisel and some sand paper to flatten the area after the glue dries. You need something for the threads to bite into. Wood putty will just crumble when you go to insert the screw.

#6 6 years ago

Put a little wood glue in the hole. Put a couple small pieces of toothpick or slivers of wood in and your good to go.
Alex

#7 6 years ago

Bamboo skewers here. I prefer the results over tooth picks but they both work.

Definitely NOT wood putty.

#8 6 years ago

A heard that blue stuff, loctite is good. Anyone use that?

#9 6 years ago

The skewers are your best bet. Add some titebond wood glue and you're golden.

If the hole is too small for a skewer, then a toothpick is adequate. Skewers are better! More fibrous, so the screw has something more solid to bite into.

I would recommend not using wood putty.

#10 6 years ago

I use epoxy to fill right to the top of the hole. If the hole goes through, I put a piece of painters tape on the bottom to keep the epoxy from dripping out.

Then I drill the proper starter hole and put the post/screw back in.

Toothpicks and wood glue work just fine, just a matter of preference.

I should add, I use West Systems epoxy, and have several different hardeners depending on desired pot life. I mix by weight, and use TAP plastics resin dyes if I ever need to. Micro balloons as an additive if weight is a concern.

#11 6 years ago
Quoted from johnwartjr:

Skewers are better! More fibrous

WOW, Great idea & logic, learning something new! Bill

#12 6 years ago

These work great. Cheap fast fix. I just fixed some holes last week and was impressed.

amazon.com link »

#13 6 years ago
Quoted from Kingoftron:

A heard that blue stuff, loctite is good. Anyone use that?

Loctite is for securing metal to metal connections (ie a screw into threads). You need to replace the wood material that is stripped out in the hole, loctite won't do that. It will probably just soak into the wood and leave a stain.

#14 6 years ago

I keep around some take out chopsticks. I sharpen the end in a pencil sharpener and glue using Titebond 3 glue.

#15 6 years ago

I'll definitely try the toothpicks first, my only concern is the the screw has to go through a hole in the metal fixture and I'm not sure if there's enough space in the fixture for both the screw and the toothpick. Thanks for the tips guys!

#16 6 years ago
Quoted from Kingoftron:

I'll definitely try the toothpicks first, my only concern is the the screw has to go through a hole in the metal fixture and I'm not sure if there's enough space in the fixture for both the screw and the toothpick. Thanks for the tips guys!

This is why you fill the hole, let it fix, then drill a starter hole. The toothpick(s) just give the screw something to bite into.

#17 6 years ago

JB Weld Kwik Wood Putty. Place in, use fine point to make small hole for screw to bite on (pencil). Let dry. Good as new. Has different colors.

amazon.com link »

#18 6 years ago
Quoted from bbaker2824:

These work great. Cheap fast fix. I just fixed some holes last week and was impressed.

amazon.com link »

I've used this product on my pins and around the house for other stuff. it does indeed work as advertised.

#19 6 years ago

http://www.actionpinball.com/hardware.htm#screws_hex

I've used the oversized hex screws on a number of stripped holes (link above). If it's bad enough, then bamboo skewers from the grocery store.

#20 6 years ago
Quoted from Av8:

JB Weld Kwik Wood Putty. Place in, use fine point to make small hole for screw to bite on (pencil). Let dry. Good as new. Has different colors.
amazon.com link »

I almost said me too, but I use Quikwood. Everything else you said is me too.

http://www.pinballlife.com/index.php?p=product&id=1561

#21 6 years ago

two part wood putty is the shizzle

#22 6 years ago
Quoted from Jam_Burglar:

I'll definitely try the toothpicks first, my only concern is the the screw has to go through a hole in the metal fixture and I'm not sure if there's enough space in the fixture for both the screw and the toothpick. Thanks for the tips guys!

You put the glued toothpicks in first, stuff the hole with as many as you can. Once dry you cut off the excess flush with the playfield, or metal fixture, but if at all possible take the fixture off as you could have hidden goodies under the metal your not cleaning out or securing.

Once the fix is dry, THEN you drill a pilot hole and re-screw.

Its a pretty common fix. Especially on late 70 early 80 pins when we had the playfield technology left over from EM's. Lots of single posts with a small a grommet called a 'ring' on it. And newer technology flippers that could launch a ball through them.

Today, stuff has gotten pretty durable on the topside. My toothpicks are not running out as much.

Post edited by Patofnaud : quoted wrong post

1 year later
#23 5 years ago

Will wood filler produce the same or similar results?

#24 5 years ago

yup to toothpicks, I go about it a little differently is all. crazy-glue gel one side of 2 flat toothpicks to the hole and one dry toothpick between em to wedge clamp the two in till dry, leaves the center of the hole closer to where it oughtta be. if not tight enough then repeat at 90 degrees. same effect, just lots quicker dry time. kinda an |-| arrangement with em hadnt done it with a pinball machine yet but done plenty similar screw holes.

#25 5 years ago

I agree, toothpicks don't seem to give the same grip as other things, such as the bamboo. They work, but you done get that tight feeling sometimes.

#26 5 years ago

I use bamboo sticks or toothpicks and titebond wood glue buy dipping in glue, placing in the hole, allow to dry 24 hours and then cut the ends off after glue has dried using some old diagonal or side cutters. I Use a wood awl to reset center of the hole and to start the hole. To strengthen top of play field holes, I will use super thin (instant) super glue by wicking a drop or two into the holes to harden them up. Allow to cure for 24 hours or longer before putting screws back in.

#27 5 years ago

I don't have the patience to wait for glue - there, I said it... ahhh

#28 5 years ago

Patience my boy, as my daddy always said....

#29 5 years ago

I cut the point off one end of the toothpick, shoot some wood glue in the hole and put in the toothpick. Let it set and then run the screw in. The glue gets all over the screw and actually helps the bond.

#30 5 years ago

I've tried toothpicks and skewers which both work fine. What I have been using lately are Q-tip handles. Cut the fuzzy ends off and cut the white handle part into about 1/8" long pieces. They are slightly larger in diameter than toothpicks and stay in without glue.

#31 5 years ago
Quoted from schudel5:

I've tried toothpicks and skewers which both work fine. What I have been using lately are Q-tip handles. Cut the fuzzy ends off and cut the white handle part into about 1/8" long pieces. They are slightly larger in diameter than toothpicks and stay in without glue.

i had never heard that one before, and i am definitely going to try it... thanks for posting that tip...

#32 5 years ago

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Well, here goes nothing...

#33 5 years ago

Worked like a charm! (Of course, the screw had a pointy end but that's why it was dug out to begin with.) Tight bond II wood glue and toothpicks.

#34 5 years ago

These craft picks (I call them hillbilly toothpicks) and wood glue work well. Better than a round toothpick in my experience. Just snap off a 1/4" -5/16" piece dip it in the glue, insert and install the screw. They are not as smooth and have more surface area for the glue to adhere to than a round toothpick.100_7568.jpg

#35 5 years ago

Why not just fill the hole with epoxy instead of sticking a toothpick or q-tip stick in it?

#36 5 years ago
Quoted from Deckmanmark:

Well, here goes nothing...

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I was thinking playboy used a T Nut and bolt in that position.

#37 5 years ago
Quoted from Wolfmarsh:

Why not just fill the hole with epoxy instead of sticking a toothpick or q-tip stick in it?

More work, No need to wait for drying, no drilling required, not as good of an overall repair. A good wood glue joint IS stronger than the wood itself. Epoxy may spin loose, crack, fall out when a screw is inserted.

#38 5 years ago
Quoted from pinballlizard:

I was thinking playboy used a T Nut and bolt in that position.

I've been doing this too when the post is one that gets drilled from a ball. Remove the wood screw, drill the hole bigger and all the way through, and add a T-nut. Change the screw from a wood screw to a machine screw.

#39 5 years ago
Quoted from sixpakmopar:

More work, No need to wait for drying, no drilling required, not as good of an overall repair. A good wood glue joint IS stronger than the wood itself. Epoxy may spin loose, crack, fall out when a screw is inserted.

I agree that it's a little more work, but I disagree that it's not as good of a repair. I think it's actually a way better repair.

#40 5 years ago
Quoted from schudel5:

I've been doing this too when the post is one that gets drilled from a ball. Remove the wood screw, drill the hole bigger and all the way through, and add a T-nut. Change the screw from a wood screw to a machine screw.

Yes. I have done this a lot. Sometimes I just use a flat washer and large nylon lock nut on the underside of the play field and use a slightly longer machine screw when there is room. Lazy approach. Downside, it requires you to put a nut driver on bottom to hold the nylon nut to remove the machine screw instead of just unscrewing it from the top of the play field. I do this more when I am putting in a steel post and sleeve than a Starpost though.

#41 5 years ago

If the holes are really big, I use a golf tee.

#42 5 years ago

Schudel beat me to it, but +1 to q-tips!
However, I am speaking only of actual Q-tip brand swabs, not generic or knockoff brands.
The stems are made of what seems to be hard cardboard almost, and I have had better results than any toothpick ,matchstick, drumstick, or golf tee ever. They actually allow you to tighten the screw TIGHT!
Rarely, you will need to use 2 pieces to fill really blown out holes.
And no waiting for shit to dry, and then just crumble, or be like concrete.
As far as top PF issues, I usually just drill all the way through and use a T-nut on bottom, and long machine screw.

#43 5 years ago

This might be taking it a little too far....

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#44 5 years ago

I have used zip ties also. Stick it in the hole. Screw the screw in break off the zip tie and give it a few more turns. Works great.

2 weeks later
#45 5 years ago
Quoted from Deckmanmark:

Worked like a charm! (Of course, the screw had a pointy end but that's why it was dug out to begin with.) Tight bond II wood glue and toothpicks.

I have an alibi: after a certain amount of play, I've found the post has become unstable again. Not loose, per se, but it's only a matter of time. I expect I'm going to have to investigate what the appropriate screw is and quite possibly replace the post as it's chipped on the bottom. Could be the reason for the negative development.

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