(Topic ID: 256264)

Storage unit question

By fattdirk

1 year ago


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  • 42 posts
  • 23 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 months ago by swampfire
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    #1 1 year ago

    I'm out of room but am a hoarder when it comes to pins. I'm considering getting a storage unit to regain use of my garage and put some long term projects in. Just curious if other's have storage units, how big and what things I should consider while shopping for one.

    24
    #2 1 year ago

    It needs to be climate controlled year round. Go for an indoor storage place. Otherwise you will be pulling out machines with rusted assemblies and planked playfields.

    No matter what, If you store them a mile or ten miles away, you wont touch them. Once you get sick of the ever increasing storage fees, you will just bring them back home again after spending $1500 a year to store them.

    #3 1 year ago

    I have more games than my house can store. I lent out 5 working games that I rotate around. Hopefully, as I get some of the projects fixed and lent out for a while, I'll be comfortable about selling a reliable game.

    #4 1 year ago
    Quoted from MrBally:

    It needs to be climate controlled year round. Go for an indoor storage place. Otherwise you will be pulling out machines with rusted assemblies and planked playfields.
    No matter what, If you store them a mile or ten miles away, you wont touch them. Once you get sick of the ever increasing storage fees, you will just bring them back home again after spending $1500 a year to store them.

    This is exactly what I worry about. We're going to be moving in the next 6 months hopefully if we find a house we like. I was considering just building a building since you can get a decent storage shed for 3k and it's yours but I don't want to do that now since we might be moving. Maybe I'll just fold up stuff in my gameroom for now and just have one machine to play at a time.

    #5 1 year ago

    I bought a sea container and dropped it on my property for my overflow. It's cheaper in the long run than storage units.

    #6 1 year ago
    Quoted from MrBally:

    It needs to be climate controlled year round.

    Keep in mind that there are two kinds of climate controlled units. Units that are actually at a consistent set temperature, and units that have a large swing range from something like 50'F-80'F. Swing temperatures are not good for pins, especially during the weather transitions between seasons.

    For any space, take advantage of as much vertical space as possible.

    I found that these racks are a good fit for backboxes: https://www.lowes.com/pd/edsal-24-in-D-x-77-in-W-x-72-in-H-3-Tier-Steel-Freestanding-Shelving-Unit/3172913

    #7 1 year ago
    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    Keep in mind that there are two kinds of climate controlled units. Units that are actually at a consistent set temperature, and units that have a large swing range from something like 50'F-80'F. Swing temperatures are not good for pins, especially during the weather transitions between seasons.
    For any space, take advantage of as much vertical space as possible.
    I found that these racks are a good fit for backboxes: https://www.lowes.com/pd/edsal-24-in-D-x-77-in-W-x-72-in-H-3-Tier-Steel-Freestanding-Shelving-Unit/3172913

    That's why I mentioned to get an indoor storage place (Like the abandoned Mills slot machine factory on Fullerton in Chicago). They are maintained at 68° in the Winter and 75° in the Summer. At least in the Northern climate.

    #8 1 year ago
    Quoted from MrBally:

    That's why I mentioned to get an indoor storage place (Like the abandoned Mills slot machine factory on Fullerton in Chicago). They are maintained at 68° in the Winter and 75° in the Summer. At least in the Northern climate.

    Around here, they play very loose with the "climate controlled" term, even with indoor units. You just really need to ask to what extent the unit is actually climate controlled.

    #9 1 year ago

    Just remember... "group" storage units are a unnecessary evil. They get you in... expect that you won't get out... and start wratching up the rent almost immediately. They are gambling you won't want to move your crap to another competitor.

    The best thing I did was buy a
    Costco plastic "car" shed; build it off the ground one spring... and put my overflow there. The car shed paid for itself in like 8mths.

    #10 1 year ago

    Friends and families houses make great storage spaces as well. I currently have several games at family members houses to keep them indoors in climate control because I don't want to sell them. Just waiting for my kids to all be out and off at college so I can fill their bedrooms with games.....

    #11 1 year ago

    Above advise about getting a unit that is; indoors, climate controlled with few temperature swings is really good. Search https://www.sparefoot.com/Johns-Creek-GA-self-storage.html to find the best rates near you. Most storage companies give you a free first month. Zitt made a good point about them slowly raising your rates.

    #12 1 year ago

    Sell a few games that you could more easily get back at a later date.
    Or
    Find a friend that can store games for you

    #13 1 year ago

    Any friends with bars or barcades?
    Might make a little money in meantime.

    #14 1 year ago

    Once you are there more than a couple years they constantly raise the rates figuring you'll just keep paying. I have been trying to make more room at home so I can empty mine. My rate has almost tripled since I first got it. Without a doubt I would have I would have been better off either selling stuff or just not buying as much considering the thousands I have spent to store stuff.

    #15 1 year ago

    you'll find most neighbors or friends would love to babysit a pinball in their basement.

    #16 1 year ago
    Quoted from ccbiggsoo7:

    you'll find most neighbors or friends would love to babysit a pinball in their basement.

    family, friends, neighbors..in that order

    #17 1 year ago

    When I was contemplating a storage unit, I realized it was time to let stuff go. You can always get stuff back. Whatever you think you can't get back easily or for what you sold it for, keep. This will eliminate your lack of space issue.

    #18 1 year ago

    I have two pins (Time warp & who dunnit) in storage right now, and hate it every month when I pay the bill. They've been in there so long, I could have bought them again with the money I've paid for storage.

    I moved everything from my basement to the storage unit to make room for pins. But we only use 3-4 boxes from the storage unit each year, which could easily be kept in a closet at the house.

    We've been planning to get everything out of the unit for 2 years now, and just never really want to deal with it. Probably time for a yard sale, and to find a friend that wants to have a couple pins at their house.

    #19 1 year ago

    Sounds like I should buy some land and invest in a storage unit

    #20 1 year ago
    Quoted from fattdirk:

    Sounds like I should buy some land and invest in a storage unit

    there was some dude on here who bought his storage unit, I looked in my area and found a similar place.
    No idea what it cost, but I'm sure it's not cheap.
    https://www.luxurywarehousestorage.com/

    #21 1 year ago

    Owns 36 pinball machines...

    Scoffs at buying a Costco shed

    #22 1 year ago
    Quoted from fattdirk:

    Sounds like I should buy some land and invest in a storage unit

    Have you ever thought of buying a second house in your neighborhood, using it as a rental, and keeping the rental house garage to use as your storage?
    I am serious.

    Looking at your neighborhood it appears $120k will buy you a reasonable 3b/1ba ranch. Appears you could add a garage to most of the homes that dont have one. Also appears that you can get 1000-1300 in rent and your neighborhood looks to probably have a nice tenant base.

    So basically, I would advise selling a few of your newer games to raise 20k in down payment capital (if you dont have it already on hand; guessing you likely do). Take that 20k, put in a little sweat equity over the winter and you have a positive cash flow investment already PLUS you get to use that rental garage as your overflow storage.

    The numbers work out pretty easy on this one.

    Why pay for storage, when you can get paid AND get free storage?

    #23 1 year ago
    Quoted from Whysnow:

    Have you ever thought of buying a second house in your neighborhood, using it as a rental, and keeping the rental house garage to use as your storage?
    I am serious.
    Looking at your neighborhood it appears $120k will buy you a reasonable 3b/1ba ranch. Appears you could add a garage to most of the homes that dont have one. Also appears that you can get 1000-1300 in rent and your neighborhood looks to probably have a nice tenant base.
    So basically, I would advise selling a few of your newer games to raise 20k in down payment capital (if you dont have it already on hand; guessing you likely do). Take that 20k, put in a little sweat equity over the winter and you have a positive cash flow investment already PLUS you get to use that rental garage as your overflow storage.
    The numbers work out pretty easy on this one.
    Why pay for storage, when you can get paid AND get free storage?

    Neat Idea, I may have to think about that.

    #24 1 year ago
    Quoted from jjoravec:

    Neat Idea, I may have to think about that.

    It works. There honestly is not much to it if you are even somewhat handy (i assume most on here are).

    The biggest issue for most people seems to be finding the motivation to just do it! Once you get started, you will be surprised how easy it is.
    Once you get the snowball rolling you will ask yourself why you did not do it years ago.

    Once you get the first house paid off (hopefully soon for me) and you see an extra 10k on your annual salary then the snowball can really pick up steam.

    My advice is to buy smart, never use a real estate agent (they eat into profits and for $600 you can hire a good real estate lawyer to handle things for you), and just buy good bones.

    After that the operational side is my least favorite but once you get a system down for finding and retaining good tenants then it gets better.

    I am looking at my 5th rental to possibly purchase later today. This one has a big enough garage that I could wall off the entire back half, add security and temperature control for a little money, and have enough storage to fit all my current overflow

    #25 1 year ago
    Quoted from Whysnow:

    Have you ever thought of buying a second house in your neighborhood, using it as a rental, and keeping the rental house garage to use as your storage?
    I am serious.
    Looking at your neighborhood it appears $120k will buy you a reasonable 3b/1ba ranch. Appears you could add a garage to most of the homes that dont have one. Also appears that you can get 1000-1300 in rent and your neighborhood looks to probably have a nice tenant base.
    So basically, I would advise selling a few of your newer games to raise 20k in down payment capital (if you dont have it already on hand; guessing you likely do). Take that 20k, put in a little sweat equity over the winter and you have a positive cash flow investment already PLUS you get to use that rental garage as your overflow storage.
    The numbers work out pretty easy on this one.
    Why pay for storage, when you can get paid AND get free storage?

    No but that's a good idea. I'm just too lazy

    1 year later
    #26 4 months ago

    I need to store some pins in a storage unit for a few months. Has anyone ever figured out how many pins folded up on end would fit in say a 10X15 storage unit?

    #27 4 months ago
    Quoted from PhillyArcade:

    I need to store some pins in a storage unit for a few months. Has anyone ever figured out how many pins folded up on end would fit in say a 10X15 storage unit?

    If you figure about a 30" x 30" footprint per folded game, that could maybe give you a maximum of 24 games. Maybe less depending on the exact sizes of the games, how much gap space you loose between games, and the exact size of the space (ie, there aren't any support poles or floor plates in the way along the walls).

    #28 4 months ago

    I know this might sound like an idea that you don't like, but if you consider how many games that you really play and work properly, perhaps there are some that don't get played as much or don't work as well as you would like. Maybe you could sell some that you like less and make more room without moving anything or renting storage. Just a thought...

    #29 4 months ago
    Quoted from Whysnow:

    It works. There honestly is not much to it if you are even somewhat handy (i assume most on here are).
    The biggest issue for most people seems to be finding the motivation to just do it! Once you get started, you will be surprised how easy it is.
    Once you get the snowball rolling you will ask yourself why you did not do it years ago.
    Once you get the first house paid off (hopefully soon for me) and you see an extra 10k on your annual salary then the snowball can really pick up steam.
    My advice is to buy smart, never use a real estate agent (they eat into profits and for $600 you can hire a good real estate lawyer to handle things for you), and just buy good bones.
    After that the operational side is my least favorite but once you get a system down for finding and retaining good tenants then it gets better.
    I am looking at my 5th rental to possibly purchase later today. This one has a big enough garage that I could wall off the entire back half, add security and temperature control for a little money, and have enough storage to fit all my current overflow

    I went down this road. While it can work. 4 times over 15 years the garage/basement was flooded by a tenant by mistake and made a mess.

    Quoted from ForceFlow:

    If you figure about a 30" x 30" footprint per folded game, that could maybe give you a maximum of 24 games. Maybe less depending on the exact sizes of the games, how much gap space you loose between games, and the exact size of the space (ie, there aren't any support poles or floor plates in the way along the walls).

    Sounds good thanks for the ballpark!! I have 14 pins plus a few arcade games I need to move into one for a few months so sounds like it will work well. I have a TZ that's the only wide body. I also might sell a few. Just curious if they would fit in the that size space since the next size space up from that is a lot more money. I looked at the unit today wide open with a big door nothing in the way. I'm also getting a 15x10 gives me some width so it's not so deep.

    #30 4 months ago
    Quoted from Dent00:

    I know this might sound like an idea that you don't like, but if you consider how many games that you really play and work properly, perhaps there are some that don't get played as much or don't work as well as you would like. Maybe you could sell some that you like less and make more room without moving anything or renting storage. Just a thought...

    I would sell in a second if I had to do long term storage for sure. I would never want to do that to pins leave them in a storage unit folded up for years. I just need to relocate them for a few months and I'm going to sell maybe one or two just for some breathing room. Drives me nuts when people have pins and arcade games jammed in a storage unit long term due to hoarding. Really makes no sense and its sad.

    #31 4 months ago

    I've had for years, 10'x15', costs $600 a year when paid a year at a time. My gameroom and work area isn't accessible in the winter when there is snow on the ground unless I lug a game thru the house and down a staircase by myself. It's very convenient in winter to have a place to drop a project pin till spring. I always pull the BG and PF to my home, so I'm basically storing cabinets. I can then prep PF's and in spring move the accumulated projects home. I can easily fit a dozen games in it with plenty of room.

    1 week later
    #32 3 months ago
    Quoted from PhillyArcade:

    I went down this road. While it can work. 4 times over 15 years the garage/basement was flooded by a tenant by mistake and made a mess.

    Sounds good thanks for the ballpark!! I have 14 pins plus a few arcade games I need to move into one for a few months so sounds like it will work well. I have a TZ that's the only wide body. I also might sell a few. Just curious if they would fit in the that size space since the next size space up from that is a lot more money. I looked at the unit today wide open with a big door nothing in the way. I'm also getting a 15x10 gives me some width so it's not so deep.

    Befriend the owner/manager of the storage unit and talk them into putting you near an outlet and then bring an extension cord.

    I use my storage unit as a 3rd gameroom for the games that need a deep clean and that I don’t want near my nice games! It’s nice to be able to work on them and play them in genuine peace and quiet! Get a unit with doors on both sides, it makes is sooooo much easier to get to what you want. At worst you only have to ever move half the stuff to get to everything! No more moving everything to get to one thing in the back.

    #33 3 months ago

    Since 1997 I have purchased seven pins NIB. I kept the large box (and all packing materials) for some in my crawl space, thinking I might reuse the box if I ever sold a pin in order to buy a different game. But I have not sold any (and probably never will).

    The popularity of Storage Wars on cable TV made me think about renting a small unit (they occasionally offer the first month free), putting all my empty pinball boxes in it (all nicely taped up to look like sealed NIB games), and not paying any further storage charges. Can you imagine people bidding on the defaulted unit after being allowed to look in but not touch anything? The winning bidder would sure be in for a surprise.

    #34 3 months ago
    Quoted from littlecammi:

    Since 1997 I have purchased seven pins NIB. I kept the large box (and all packing materials) for some in my crawl space, thinking I might reuse the box if I ever sold a pin in order to buy a different game. But I have not sold any (and probably never will).
    The popularity of Storage Wars on cable TV made me think about renting a small unit (they occasionally offer the first month free), putting all my empty pinball boxes in it (all nicely taped up to look like sealed NIB games), and not paying any further storage charges. Can you imagine people bidding on the defaulted unit after being allowed to look in but not touch anything? The winning bidder would sure be in for a surprise.

    Now that's just evil

    #35 3 months ago
    Quoted from littlecammi:

    Since 1997 I have purchased seven pins NIB. I kept the large box (and all packing materials) for some in my crawl space, thinking I might reuse the box if I ever sold a pin in order to buy a different game. But I have not sold any (and probably never will).
    The popularity of Storage Wars on cable TV made me think about renting a small unit (they occasionally offer the first month free), putting all my empty pinball boxes in it (all nicely taped up to look like sealed NIB games), and not paying any further storage charges. Can you imagine people bidding on the defaulted unit after being allowed to look in but not touch anything? The winning bidder would sure be in for a surprise.

    Saving cardboard boxes seems a little bit extreme. Might be time to visit the recycling bin with those boxes. You can always get more boxes later. Maybe save one in the attic or some other place rarely visited.

    #36 3 months ago
    Quoted from littlecammi:

    and not paying any further storage charges.

    Might effect your credit rating.

    Quoted from littlecammi:

    Can you imagine people bidding on the defaulted unit after being allowed to look in but not touch anything? The winning bidder would sure be in for a surprise.

    Many states require contents to be inventoried. Empty cardboard boxes won't lessen how much you still owe on the abandoned unit.

    LTG : )

    #37 3 months ago
    Quoted from Isochronic_Frost:

    Befriend the owner/manager of the storage unit and talk them into putting you near an outlet and then bring an extension cord.
    I use my storage unit as a 3rd gameroom for the games that need a deep clean and that I don’t want near my nice games! It’s nice to be able to work on them and play them in genuine peace and quiet! Get a unit with doors on both sides, it makes is sooooo much easier to get to what you want. At worst you only have to ever move half the stuff to get to everything! No more moving everything to get to one thing in the back.

    This storage place is brand new and not one outlet to be seen anywhere! I was shocked there is usually something in the hallway. The lights are led motion lights so no more unscrewing the light bulb and adding some outlets there. The nice part about this unit is it's 15 across by 10 so it's a big door and easy to maneuver the game around. Amazing how expensive climate controlled units have gotten. Hopefully they won't be in there too long. It is nice and quiet in there was hoping for an outlet within reach but I looked all over not one to be seen.

    #38 3 months ago
    Quoted from PhillyArcade:

    This storage place is brand new and not one outlet to be seen anywhere! I was shocked there is usually something in the hallway. The lights are led motion lights so no more unscrewing the light bulb and adding some outlets there. The nice part about this unit is it's 15 across by 10 so it's a big door and easy to maneuver the game around. Amazing how expensive climate controlled units have gotten. Hopefully they won't be in there too long. It is nice and quiet in there was hoping for an outlet within reach but I looked all over not one to be seen.

    You can try asking, just say it’s to test some things before you put them away or pull them out? Some guys try to charge you but my guy hasn’t and he said “who cares this place makes tons of money as is. I don’t need to charge a fee for using the outlet for an hour” storage units are hell of a racket.

    They usually have outlets SOMEWHERE sometimes hidden up in the ceiling to vacuum/use power tools for maintenance work.

    Mine is the 15 across by 10 as well and it’s awesome. I have my shuffle bowler setup with 6 pins and a couch lol. I also got some hooks and strung up removable LEDs. My last step is to bring in a jukebox. Or a mini fridge

    #39 3 months ago

    I’m paying about $800 a year for my climate-controlled 10x10. I can keep 2 big shelves of parts and 8 games in it. The vast majority of the pins I store are 80’s games that I’ve spent weeks or months restoring. The place didn’t raise my rate at all this year, which surprised me. You definitely have to be prepared to move every 2-3 years. One time I had my mom rent the unit next to mine, same size, for $100 less. I just moved my stuff with a hand truck, only took a few hours.

    #40 3 months ago
    Quoted from Isochronic_Frost:

    You can try asking, just say it’s to test some things before you put them away or pull them out? Some guys try to charge you but my guy hasn’t and he said “who cares this place makes tons of money as is. I don’t need to charge a fee for using the outlet for an hour” storage units are hell of a racket.
    They usually have outlets SOMEWHERE sometimes hidden up in the ceiling to vacuum/use power tools for maintenance work.
    Mine is the 15 across by 10 as well and it’s awesome. I have my shuffle bowler setup with 6 pins and a couch lol. I also got some hooks and strung up removable LEDs. My last step is to bring in a jukebox. Or a mini fridge

    This place is brand new so I think they thought of every way to keep costs down. The ceiling is about 12 foot and I've looked around not an outlet in site. I actually walked around the entire place nothing. The storage units are 8 feet tall with heavy thick chicken wire between the 8 foot and 12 foot ceiling. I've rented in older places and they had outlets around and didn't mind if you plugged in but this place is just too new. LED motion lights in the units direct wired in. Other than pulling that out and adding a box with an outlet that's about it. They got smart! Either way at this point it's just for storage till I can buy a bigger house. Sucks this housing market is hot though.

    #41 3 months ago
    Quoted from swampfire:

    I’m paying about $800 a year for my climate-controlled 10x10. I can keep 2 big shelves of parts and 8 games in it. The vast majority of the pins I store are 80’s games that I’ve spent weeks or months restoring. The place didn’t raise my rate at all this year, which surprised me. You definitely have to be prepared to move every 2-3 years. One time I had my mom rent the unit next to mine, same size, for $100 less. I just moved my stuff with a hand truck, only took a few hours.

    Ya'll got some cheap units! My climate controlled 10x15 is $200 a month!

    #42 3 months ago
    Quoted from PhillyArcade:

    Ya'll got some cheap units! My climate controlled 10x15 is $200 a month!

    My old 10x15 unit was $230 a month when I moved out. It motivated me to downsize to a 10x10. I’m shocked that they didn’t raise my rate from $800 a year, after my first year.

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