Stock Market Traders?

(Topic ID: 175889)

Stock Market Traders?


By kpg

2 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 1,142 posts
  • 146 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 days ago by desertT1
  • Topic is favorited by 71 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 56 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    FCB5EF38-E524-4306-8720-6FE0E0A5AD37 (resized).jpeg
    2FF98A65-320B-4D62-A9E0-E95F2D95A84C (resized).png
    27B33194-4A1E-4CA8-AA72-4551C862287E (resized).jpeg
    071A42FB-39B6-4736-95E4-7F54BE506500 (resized).png
    7EB54C66-D841-4C31-AC90-86924084B9DD (resized).jpeg
    Screen Shot 2018-09-07 at 2.30.30 PM (resized).png
    cronos (resized).JPG
    478306F5-44E7-4412-AA54-92B741236C06 (resized).png
    FE3BE21F-4F71-41DB-A660-B457D06EE54D (resized).png
    0C6E7317-02EA-4E95-BC76-96C0228D836C (resized).png
    phase 1-4 (resized).png
    SP500-vs-Commodities-768x566 (resized).png
    ETF (resized).png
    cycles-1 (resized).jpg
    credit cycle (resized).jpg
    Screen Shot 2018-02-16 at 2.51.06 PM (resized).png

    There are 1142 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 23.
    #1 2 years ago

    Anyone here trade the market? We are currently nearing Dow 20K and thought this would be a good time to make a thread and see what other pinheads trade or invest in the market.

    I am a short term trader, with about 90% of my trades lasting less then a week. I have been doing this for almost 15 years now.

    As of today, I have decided to short the stock market here using the DXD ETF (long a large position at $14.00 even) and also using TVIX (ETF that tracks VIX futures, not the VIX itself - highly risky and not an investment ETF by a longshot) avg of $10.17. I will sell on a big spike / market decline and lock in profit, or cut losses quickly if I am wrong (stop loss at $13.00 on DXD and $9.00 on TVIX)

    Currently the Dow is at its most overbought levels I have seen in many years, and DXD is the most oversold I have seen it.

    The Fed meeting going on between today and tomorrow should result in a rate hike, which is supposedly priced in. I am expecting a 'sell the news' scenario and a large pullback.

    Good luck to anyone long in the market right now.. in my opinion, today would be a great day to sell and buy back on a bigger pullback. It should be getting turbulent out there very soon.

    “Be Fearful When Others Are Greedy and Greedy When Others Are Fearful”
    -Warren Buffet

    #2 2 years ago

    I just do whatever the pony tail brothers tell me too.

    28
    #3 2 years ago

    I began investing in mutual funds when I was 23 and set aside 15% of my salary to do this. My wife, though we hadn't met yet, was doing the same as me.

    Other than rebalancing, we've never sold. Not in 2000, 2001, 2008, or any other time. We are now early 40s and contemplating an early retirement by early 50s. We save about 23% of our gross these days.

    Simple, cheap, boring, stress free...and highly successful.

    #4 2 years ago

    Cashed out my small stock account to put into the down payment of the house. Haven't put anything back in since then, but still watch things. I did options more than stocks and did pretty well % wise. I started with a pretty small amount, but it was for fun. 401k is the growth/retirement fund and that's not getting touched more than to adjust with plan changes.

    #5 2 years ago
    Quoted from investingdad:

    I began investing in mutual funds when I was 23 and set aside 15% of my salary to do this. My wife, though we hadn't met yet, was doing the same as me.
    Other than rebalancing, we've never sold. Not in 2000, 2001, 2008, or any other time. We are now early 40s and contemplating an early retirement by early 50s. We save about 23% of our gross these days.
    Simple, cheap, boring, stress free...and highly successful.

    Smart man ! I guess it depends on which mutual funds you are in as well, as some funds are hedged with short positions- but I can see why this strategy would work, although gains are much lower. I average about 15-20% per year, and some even higher - but a lot of work goes into swing trading.

    #6 2 years ago

    I've always been curious about investments but never know how to dive into these things. I remember when tesla came out. I wanted to invest but never knew the way. Now something else as peaked my curiosity...how would one start?

    #7 2 years ago

    Index funds...I look for lowest management fees and avoid actively managed funds. I've shifted from a 90/10 equity to bond mix to a 75/25 mix over the last ten years.

    I return market average year in and year out.

    The most important years of returns were from age 23 to age 29. That's because few people invest during those years. By the time most people start thinking of retirement as they turn 30 ish, we already had a full decade under our belts. The snowball affect on our portfolio kicked in as we hit mid 30s.

    It's for this reason I often marvel at folks with as much money in pins that they have.

    #8 2 years ago

    Not an active market trader but I am in the market. I'm old school buy and hold solid companies...and I like stocks that pay dividends as well.

    Recently I got involved with the online loan companies like Prosper and Lending Club. I'm in Prosper. It has not been long enough for me to really sing it praises but so far I like what I'm seeing. Very customizable (if you want) as far as what types of loans you get involved in (I prefer debt consolidation) and also the level of risk you want to take on. Loans are rated from AA-HR. My highest percentage is in B & C rated loans. I'm currently averaging 10.7% annualized which beats the market....but, that is not a final number and will likely dip a little as more defaults show up. Should still beat the market average though.

    Right now I'm showing 21 defaulted loans.....which sounds a little scary until you realise I'm spread out over 264 loans total.

    #9 2 years ago

    Some of my recent transactions:

    Bought:
    400 shares SLB, 325 shares CVX, 600 shares XOM back in May
    500 Shares Disney, 20,000 shares HOV in September

    Sold:
    3 AMZN puts January 750 took in 41 and 3 GOOG puts January 750 took in 18 back in November

    #10 2 years ago
    Quoted from flashinstinct:

    I've always been curious about investments but never know how to dive into these things. I remember when tesla came out. I wanted to invest but never knew the way. Now something else as peaked my curiosity...how would one start?

    There's 3 things your grandfather will tell you, that your grandmother never will.

    1 - Start young
    2 - Stick it everywhere
    3 - Do it as often as possible

    Something like this is good for people who aren't investment savvy: http://www.jhinvestments.com/Fund/Overview.aspx?ProductType=MutualFund&FundID=2DFC&ClassCode=A&BackToFundTableType=Price

    #11 2 years ago
    Quoted from kpg:

    Anyone here trade the market? We are currently nearing Dow 20K and thought this would be a good time to make a thread and see what other pinheads trade or invest in the market.
    I am a short term trader, with about 90% of my trades lasting less then a week. I have been doing this for almost 15 years now.
    As of today, I have decided to short the stock market here using the DXD ETF (long a large position at $14.00 even) and also using TVIX (ETF that tracks VIX futures, not the VIX itself - highly risky and not an investment ETF by a longshot) avg of $10.17. I will sell on a big spike / market decline and lock in profit, or cut losses quickly if I am wrong (stop loss at $13.00 on DXD and $9.00 on TVIX)
    Currently the Dow is at its most overbought levels I have seen in many years, and DXD is the most oversold I have seen it.
    The Fed meeting going on between today and tomorrow should result in a rate hike, which is supposedly priced in. I am expecting a 'sell the news' scenario and a large pullback.
    Good luck to anyone long in the market right now.. in my opinion, today would be a great day to sell and buy back on a bigger pullback. It should be getting turbulent out there very soon.
    “Be Fearful When Others Are Greedy and Greedy When Others Are Fearful”
    -Warren Buffet

    Problem with short ETFs and x2 x3 ETFs is they rebalance every day good for day trades only then you pay heavy tax with short cap gain

    #12 2 years ago

    I'm not super active either, but I make a few trades a year. The bulk of my investments are three Vanguard Mutual Funds: VGENX, VASVX, and VGELX. I only started buying VGENX after the oil markets tanked. Other current holdings include: BABA, AMZN, ATW, BAS, F, FTS, FRO, HZNP, NTEK, NTDOY, PG, LUV, RIG, WMT, and DIS. Most of the oil and NTEK were small gambles, hoping for a breakout after they crashed. I'll take any advise you smart guys have to share.

    #13 2 years ago
    Quoted from lpeters82:

    I'll take any advise you smart guys have to share.

    The easy money from the Trump rally has already been made.

    If I were buying today, I wouldn't go in head first. I'd start nibbling and slowly build positions, waiting for a pullback.

    14
    #14 2 years ago
    Quoted from Trekkie1978:

    1 - Start young
    2 - Stick it everywhere
    3 - Do it as often as possible

    That strategy ended up costing me a lot of money, kids are #%@& expensive!

    #15 2 years ago

    Honestly right now I'm just doing a slow buy every month into those thee mutual funds.

    #16 2 years ago
    Quoted from BudManPinFan:

    That strategy ended up costing me a lot of money, kids are #%@& expensive!

    I don't plan on having kids, but what I see parents do for their kids, in my mind, is irrational. People will sacrifice their retirement, in order to give as much as they can to their kids today.

    Conversation I had with my mailman the other day:
    Mailman - "Have a wife or kids?"
    Me - "nope."
    Mailman - "Remember, when you get married and have kids, you can kiss your Camaro goodbye."
    Me - "my closest friends are married, I don't plan on following that path."
    Mailman - "I have a wife and kids...I'll be working for the rest of my life."
    Me - "Ouch"."
    Mailman - "If any woman tries to convince you to get married and have kids, just remember one thing...when you're single, your pockets jingle."

    #17 2 years ago
    Quoted from Trekkie1978:

    I don't plan on having kids, but what I see parents do for their kids, in my mind, is irrational. People will sacrifice their retirement, in order to give as much as they can to their kids today.
    Conversation I had with my mailman the other day:
    Mailman - "Have a wife or kids?"
    Me - "nope."
    Mailman - "Remember, when you get married and have kids, you can kiss your Camaro goodbye."
    Me - "my closest friends are married, I don't plan on following that path."
    Mailman - "I have a wife and kids...I'll be working for the rest of my life."
    Me - "Ouch"."
    Mailman - "If any woman tries to convince you to get married and have kids, just remember one thing...when you're single, your pockets jingle."

    Cute conversation, but it's not all doom and gloom - it's entirely possible to have your cake and eat it too... my young kids are already setup for schooling, my wife and I have worked hard, invested wisely, and now that I'm mid 40's I can see a few more years of work then I'm done. I've got way better cars, toys and access to disposable cash since being married than I ever had when I was single. It's all swings and roundabouts, but in the end 2 people working together will achieve more than 1... just my $0.02...

    #18 2 years ago
    Quoted from pocketscience:

    Cute conversation, but it's not all doom and gloom - it's entirely possible to have your cake and eat it too... my young kids are already setup for schooling, my wife and I have worked hard, invested wisely, and now that I'm mid 40's I can see a few more years of work then I'm done. I've got way better cars, toys and access to disposable cash since being married than I ever had when I was single. It's all swings and roundabouts, but in the end 2 people working together will achieve more than 1... just my $0.02...

    Sound just like us.

    I make a pretty handsome income, but my wife earns about 20% more.

    And we're both savers and investors.

    For the win.

    12
    #19 2 years ago

    Not to brag, but my wife and I both make 5 figures.

    PS: In all seriousness, I love being married and having kids. I have just as much (if not more) fun as when I was single. Having said that if it's not for you that's cool too. I just don't like all the people who think all marriages mean a total loss of freedom.

    #20 2 years ago
    Quoted from lpeters82:

    Not to brag, but my wife and I both make 5 figures.
    PS: In all seriousness, I love being married and having kids. I have just as much (if not more) fun as when I was single. Having said that if it's not for you that's cool too. I just don't like all the people who think all marriages mean a total loss of freedom.

    It totally comes down to who you marry.

    If I ever get married, page 2,853 of my prenup will discuss who can boss who around...basically, I can't boss her and she can't boss me.

    A close friend of mine, comes back from his honeymoon, calls me up the next morning with a question. She left him a "to do" list. He asked me what he should do. I told him to take that list, walk up to his wife, rip it up in front of her and tell her that he's a grown man and he doesn't need someone giving him lists.

    Sadly to say, he didn't take my advice. I feel like I need to call her first to get permission for us to hang out. He is one of my friends who constantly remind me never to get married.

    #21 2 years ago

    I would have just done what was on the list... what's with all the angst really...? I'm sensing some deeper story behind your commitment issues. Anyway, this thread was about stock trading, not relationship counselling...

    #22 2 years ago
    Quoted from pocketscience:

    I would have just done what was on the list... what's with all the angst really...? I'm sensing some deeper story behind your commitment issues. Anyway, this thread was about stock trading, not relationship counselling...

    I have yet to have one friend tell me to get married.

    They all tell me not too.

    #23 2 years ago
    Quoted from Trekkie1978:

    They all tell me not too.

    Honestly I'm glad I didn't listen to everything my friends have told me to do/not do over the years... sometimes you just have to stand on your own feet and make your own decisions...

    Anyway, in stock trading news AAPL up 1.67% today! w00t!

    #24 2 years ago
    Quoted from kpg:

    I am a short term trader, with about 90% of my trades lasting less then a week.

    Check out DGAZ.

    #25 2 years ago

    Been focused on Oil, Banks, RAD........Still waiting for this pipe dream to end. The inflows are off the charts.

    #26 2 years ago

    I just got divorced and I love it. Married for 30 years. I feel like I just got pardoned from death row. I'm enjoying life now.

    #27 2 years ago
    Quoted from Trekkie1978:

    I have yet to have one friend tell me to get married.
    They all tell me not too.

    Maybe your friends married materialistic lazy rachet trollops?

    I know most of mine did. Sometimes I miss women like that tho

    Quoted from Fast-Ed:

    I just got divorced and I love it. Married for 30 years. I feel like I just got pardoned from death row. I'm enjoying life now.

    Reminds me of a buddy. He's 58 & about oh maybe 5 years ago or so he got divorced. Always said "The preacher gave me a life sentence but the judge let me go after 30 years for good behavior" lol

    #28 2 years ago

    Growing old alone doesn't sound like any fun either.

    #29 2 years ago

    I'll show you what happened from a technical standpoint today, and why I feel the market is in a 'Blow Off Top' stage of the rally. This is where everyone crams into the trade because of euphoria.. people who feel they may have missed a lot of the run, but are still overly confident there is more gains to be made, and their greed takes over vs logic.

    This demand at the tail end of a big rally is called an 'exhaustion gap'. This is where smart money sells into this big demand, gapping the market up via stock futures- and also people go short. The reason for this is the risk vs reward now favors the downside vs upside.

    Also, one of my favorite indicators of overbought/oversold conditions is the RSI (14) indicator on a daily chart. Here you can see the RSI approaching the 90 area. Anything over 85 is extremely rare.

    You will also notice a significant deviation from where the current market is at versus the 50d MA (the blue moving average line in the chart) - the largest deviation I can find on the Dow chart since 2010.. almost 7 years ago. This is very dangerous to go long here.. even if there are some more small gains to be had.

    Here is the current chart:

    DIA (resized).png

    A graphic I found via Google images showing an exhaustion gap (in the actual market indexes huge gaps shown like this are rare, but a gap is a gap):

    exhaustiongap (resized).png

    #30 2 years ago

    I work in a trading pit all day. My hat is off to all those that beat their benchmarks. The size of the moves and the changes in volaitility from day to day have been impressive this year. My money is all in mutual funds and ETFs as I can't really trade due to compliance reasons. Tomorrow has a chance to be very interesting.

    #31 2 years ago

    i play mutual funds - i get in and out of fidelity growth - i usually do very well in trying to time the market - about 18 months ago i got completely out expecting a big drop - it hasn't really come - well i look like an idiot as the last 18 months have been good - oh well i have done well enough over the years to balance out looking like an idiot now.

    there were a couple of years were i averaged over 40% return for the year - can't brag about that as the last 2 years it's been the 1% money market return as i am still waiting for the big drop.

    thnaks ed

    #32 2 years ago

    Bought SRT in June this year (Aus stock market) at 2.6c prior to it being relisted as IAM, then it jumped to 4.4c, bought a heap more in November - has just touched 9c today. Happy days!!

    pasted_image (resized).png

    #33 2 years ago
    Quoted from flashinstinct:

    I've always been curious about investments but never know how to dive into these things. I remember when tesla came out. I wanted to invest but never knew the way. Now something else as peaked my curiosity...how would one start?

    Scottrade.com

    #34 2 years ago
    Quoted from flashinstinct:

    I've always been curious about investments but never know how to dive into these things. I remember when tesla came out. I wanted to invest but never knew the way. Now something else as peaked my curiosity...how would one start?

    ok what stock are you eyeing?

    #35 2 years ago

    Subscribed. Haven't done any stock investing (solely mutual funds) but getting started soon. Any company you guys recommend to open an account with (Scotttrade, TD Ameritrade) and/or apps to download to watch my stocks closely?

    #36 2 years ago
    Quoted from seshpilot:

    Subscribed. Haven't done any stock investing (solely mutual funds) but getting started soon. Any company you guys recommend to open an account with (Scotttrade, TD Ameritrade) and/or apps to download to watch my stocks closely?

    Scottrade was recently acquired by TD Ameritrade, so in the next 6-8 months you will likely see their IT teams transition and integrate their website and trading platform into TDA. I would suggest opening an account with TDA and avoid the transition.

    Also, if you dont already have a Roth IRA account- that is a good place to start trading, as your capital gains are not taxed and it simplifies your profit/loss paperwork when filing taxes. It also reduces the amount you will trade with, keeping you more disciplined and taking on less risk at first. It also forces you to trade with cash only, and no margin- and you must wait until trades settle before you trade with the funds you just received from sold stock. That might not make sense now, but its an excellent safe guard for new traders and investors..

    #37 2 years ago
    Quoted from pocketscience:

    Cute conversation, but it's not all doom and gloom - it's entirely possible to have your cake and eat it too... my young kids are already setup for schooling, my wife and I have worked hard, invested wisely, and now that I'm mid 40's I can see a few more years of work then I'm done. I've got way better cars, toys and access to disposable cash since being married than I ever had when I was single. It's all swings and roundabouts, but in the end 2 people working together will achieve more than 1... just my $0.02...

    Taxation advantages in Australia are structured to benefit the nuclear family over a single person as well.

    Quoted from investingdad:

    Index funds...I look for lowest management fees and avoid actively managed funds. I've shifted from a 90/10 equity to bond mix to a 75/25 mix over the last ten years.
    I return market average year in and year out.
    The most important years of returns were from age 23 to age 29. That's because few people invest during those years. By the time most people start thinking of retirement as they turn 30 ish, we already had a full decade under our belts. The snowball affect on our portfolio kicked in as we hit mid 30s.
    It's for this reason I often marvel at folks with as much money in pins that they have.

    Agreed about investing in stocks in your 20's and always avoiding fee based managed funds. I did the same because to me I saw it as the time frame when I could afford to make investments in stocks that were seen as more volatile than traditional blue chips. I also balanced it out at the time with old school earners such as property.

    As for people's pin collections, I made a lot of sacrifices and personal investments (both financial and educational) in my 20's, now I have hit my early 40's I am seeing the dividends from it.

    Pins and cars are my only real vices, whilst still maintaining a healthy relationship with my partner.

    #38 2 years ago
    Quoted from seshpilot:

    Subscribed. Haven't done any stock investing (solely mutual funds) but getting started soon. Any company you guys recommend to open an account with (Scotttrade, TD Ameritrade) and/or apps to download to watch my stocks closely?

    Depends...how much are you investing?

    #39 2 years ago

    Invested in mutual funds via 401K years ago, and have built a nice portfolio. Currently with Fidelity, and while my choices are somewhat limited, I watch them.

    My trigger right now is the AMT.What a crock of shit. I remember learning about during tax classes, but to actually see it in action is real bitch. The max of $18K a year is also a scam. I can't believe this is how our tax laws are structured.

    Anyone else know anything on how to lessen it besides quitting my job? I pay a shitload in property taxes in WI and it gets me nothing.

    #40 2 years ago

    My guess is the Canadian marijuana stocks. Man have those things ever shot up! I should have gotten in on Canopy Growth when it was $2. Ah well....

    -3
    #41 2 years ago

    This is almost as boring as hearing about everybodys fantasy football teams.

    #42 2 years ago
    Quoted from CrazyLevi:

    This is almost as boring as hearing about everybodys fantasy football teams.

    If there's 3 topics that I can't stop talking about, it's Star Wars, pinball, and finance.

    I'll never forget being in Disney World in 1984, watching the Christmas parade. As the parade is going by, I turn to my parents and asked them if we owned Disney stock. When they said no, I asked them why not. Only if they had listened....

    #43 2 years ago

    I have a decent 401k (fidelity with not many choices) that has just been riding along for about 10 years.

    Should I be moving into something specific to keep it safe if things are going to take a dive. I honestly have not done much with it besides ocassionally rebalance of abandon stuff that sucks. I try to avoid anything with fees and have pretty much matched market or slightly better each year.

    10 years in, it is now a decent chunk of change and should learn so strategy. Anyone want to help educate a dummy?

    #44 2 years ago

    Whysnow,

    Set an equity to bond ratio based upon your age and comfort level, invest in mutual funds that meet that ratio, and then set it and forget it.

    Investing is only complicated if you make it so.

    Never triy to time the markets, just leave your investments the way they are based upon the ratio that you set.

    #45 2 years ago
    Quoted from investingdad:

    Whysnow,
    Set an equity to bond ratio based upon your age and comfort level, invest in mutual funds that meet that ratio, and then set it and forget it.
    Investing is only complicated if you make it so.
    Never triy to time the markets, just leave your investments the way they are based upon the ratio that you set.

    An old trader once told me, "When the market dips, that means things are on sale".

    He used to time the market and then realized his gains after tax and short term capital gains, wasn't very good. However, like Whysnow, everything I have is in Fidelity as well and there isn't too much that we can do. When you say set a equity to bond ration, I assume you mean stocks to cash or equivalent cash securities without any risk correct?

    #46 2 years ago
    Quoted from Whysnow:

    I have a decent 401k (fidelity with not many choices) that has just been riding along for about 10 years.
    Should I be moving into something specific to keep it safe if things are going to take a dive. I honestly have not done much with it besides ocassionally rebalance of abandon stuff that sucks. I try to avoid anything with fees and have pretty much matched market or slightly better each year.
    10 years in, it is now a decent chunk of change and should learn so strategy. Anyone want to help educate a dummy?

    I'm in the same boat, closing in on 10 years into my 401k. I changed my fund allocations this year after being in a target date retirement plan for years. Why? The target date plans that Fidelity puts employees of company sponsored 401k plans into has had rather low returns over the past 3 years and also has high account fees. The yearly fee on a target date plan through Fidelity is $6.70 for every $1k, over 30-40 years those fees add up to thousands.

    I switched my entire 401k earlier this year to the Fidelity 500 Index Institutional class fund (FXSIX). Returns are over 13% for year to date, 1 year 8%, 3 year 9%, 5 year 14%. The target date plan by comparion has return rates of 10% for year to date, 1 year 5%, 3 year 5%, and 5 year 9%. The fees on the index fund are $.35 per $1k compared to $6.70 per $1k of the target date plan.

    The 401k plan that I'm in is mostly in domestic stocks and some in foreign stocks. I expect it to go up and down over the years, heck I'm sure it will get hammered at some point by another recession. However, I have another 25 years to go and from what I read it seems best to weather the down times for higher returns over the long term. As I get closer to retirement I plan to change my allocations to a fund that is lower risk (bonds) so that I could retire at 55 (my goal) even if the economy is in a downturn.

    #47 2 years ago
    Quoted from investingdad:

    I began investing in mutual funds when I was 23 and set aside 15% of my salary to do this. My wife, though we hadn't met yet, was doing the same as me.
    Other than rebalancing, we've never sold. Not in 2000, 2001, 2008, or any other time. We are now early 40s and contemplating an early retirement by early 50s. We save about 23% of our gross these days.
    Simple, cheap, boring, stress free...and highly successful.

    Great advice. Currently that's the best advice I can echo a thousand times this !!!

    Don't try to guess where the market is going but rather take whatever the market gives you. I also say don't forget foreign stocks (that's half the stock market).

    I'm like 50:25:25 US stocks :International stocks :Bonds

    Every dog has it's day. Some day emerging market will be top, some day bonds will be top, some days international will be top some day (currently US is top). No one is king forever. You don't want to get into international after its run up so you have to always be in so you capture the run up.

    You don't ever need bonds until you do. I mean in 2008 you'd wish you had bonds. So don't wait until you wish you had them, just have them.

    IMO simplicity is the easiest and best way.

    Timing the market is hard/impossible.

    Even the experts are wrong *lots of times* Buffett lost major bank jsut like me when the last correction came down, but just like me don't panic and sell when it's doom and gloom, if you have money (bonds) you can rebalance after a correction / recession and IMO that last recession was a once or twice in a lifetime *buying opportunity* too many far too many people did just the wrong thing and sold out in the teeth of the recession.

    Just get a simple asset allocation and stick wiht it.

    #48 2 years ago
    Quoted from PanzerFreak:

    I switched my entire 401k earlier this year to the Fidelity 500 Index Institutional class fund (FXSIX). Returns are over 13% for year to date, 1 year 8%, 3 year 9%, 5 year 14%. The target date plan by comparion has return rates of 10% for year to date, 1 year 5%, 3 year 5%, and 5 year 9%. The fees on the index fund are $.35 per $1k compared to $6.70 per $1k of the target date plan.

    that is a fund I am in at about 20% of my 401 right now and have been thinking of putting more into.

    Do you have any in bonds?

    Should I be shifting to bonds over time to keep some.more of it safer?

    #49 2 years ago

    I'm a big believer in using a financial advisor.

    A competent advisor will keep you away from the herd mentality (that's why some people make nothing in the market). Plus, they look at at other things like life insurance, which many people without proper advice overlook. Plus, it's an excellent retirement tool as part of a bigger retirement package.

    Remember, they have a pretty good feel for the market. If all of their clients are saying "get me out of the market", they know it's time to get in. If they have all of their clients saying "get me into the market", they know it's time to get out.

    My advisor had an 80 year old grandma, call him up in December 1999 demanding to buy Com Qual (I know it's Qualcomm, but she called it com qual). That mentality is why many people fail with investments.

    #50 2 years ago
    Quoted from Whysnow:

    that is a fund I am in at about 20% of my 401 right now and have been thinking of putting more into.
    Do you have any in bonds?
    Should I be shifting to bonds over time to keep some.more of it safer?

    Bonds are controversial at this time (but to me they are like a necessary evil) look at this book $6 on Amazon: why bother with bonds?

    amazon.com link »

    Stocks are for making money, bonds are for keeping money. Almost like in war you need armored calvery and airforce to take ground but you need infantry to hold ground. Stocks are the big movers like tanks and fighter jets, bonds are the steady eddy like ground troops.

    The bond market is actually larger than the stock market so (likely) it's viewed as necessary by a lot of people.

    Benjamin Graham the father of modern investing theory and greatly influential on Warren Buffett said ideally you should have between 25 and 75% of assets in stocks meaning have no less than 25% in bonds (or cash).

    Bonds are in a tough place, not paying much more than Stocks do on dividends but they behave differently than stocks and you shouldn't have all your eggs in one basket you should have something that zigs when the stock market zags.

    If the interest rate goes up bond values go down but yield goes up so its a net equal. bonds are not going to make you mega bags of money like Amazon has for some, but it will help you sleep when the stock market goes to hell.

    If you are super young like 30-40's may not need bonds but as you accumulate wealth and get old like me 50s + a few things happen, less years ahead to work and make up for big losses and you actually have *real money* when I was young 6-figures was a lot but in reality it's not. I could have lots 60% of a 6-figure nest egg and made up for it in short time. If you are lucky you have 7-figures saved you really don't want to loose 60% (believe me you don't) and you may not have enough working years ahead to recoup such a huge loss.

    Here are two pictures I like to illustrate stocks and bonds:

    image (resized).jpgimage (resized).jpg

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    From: $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Flip N Out Pinball
    $ 29.99
    Cabinet - Sound/Speakers
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    From: $ 19.50
    From: $ 42.00
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 64.00
    $ 44.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    PinBoss Mods
    $ 6.00
    Electronics
    German-Pinball-Modular
    $ 72.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 999.00
    Flipper Parts
    Mircoplayfields
    From: $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Great American Pinball
    From: $ 99.99
    Cabinet - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 39.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    The MOD Couple
    From: $ 5,799.00
    Pinball Machine
    Music City Pinball
    $ 149.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 89.99
    Lighting - Led
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 49.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 9.95
    $ 15.00
    Playfield - Decals
    Metal-Mods
    $ 229.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 369.00
    Cabinet - Decals
    Mircoplayfields
    From: $ 130.00
    $ 15.00
    Lighting - Led
    3D MODS
    $ 1,099.00
    There are 1142 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 23.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside