(Topic ID: 212183)

Spray gun choice for HVLP playfield work.


By rufessor

2 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 17 posts
  • 10 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 8 months ago by Jjsmooth
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

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    #1 2 years ago

    Just curious, from the true pros or other very experienced people...

    What’s the optimal gun design for shooting horizontal surfaces like a playfield.

    I am not asking because I have not done this before, but to see what the diversity of equipment choice is among people who have had an opportunity to do this more than once and have gone through equipment and optimized a system. I have an opportunity to get a new gun (my old one died) and I want to know what others who have cycled through equipment have decided is optimal in design.

    Are gravity fed top reservoir guns good for this?

    Is there a better design?

    Do you find a larger reservoir gets in the way or is it useful ? Seems like you could mix clear up and fill reservoir a couple times if needed but maybe that sucks (my old gun was a pressurized pot system so I just don’t know).

    Anyhow- carry on. I think you get the idea here..

    Also, curious about something. When using my old gun with a pressurized pot - seemed like my lines and bottom of the pot held a good couple ounces or more so i feel like I was wasting a lot of material with my old set up. how much clear volume do you mix to spray a single playfield?? Seems like it’s got to be around 3-4 ozs but I needed a good bit more... is it really more efficient to use a gravity fed gun?

    #2 2 years ago

    Oops, I almost responded but am far from experienced.

    Well OK, in my inexperience I've used the HF hvlp gun and once I got the hang of it was mixing as little as 40cc of clear in medicine cups for thin layers of clear.

    Curious what the pros use volume wise. As far as guns, I know vid has nothing bad to say about that cheap hf gun for novices like me.

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    1 week later
    #3 2 years ago

    It depends on how much area you want to cover, but generally I prefer a top feed (gravity) HVLP like the one pictured above. Always load enough material to get your job done without a refill, as its best for paint leveling to get the whole job done uniformly.

    I use anything from a small air brush (Iwata NEO TRN-1 and for really fine work an old Paasche side cup with a really small tip) to full size HVLP units (DeVilbiss ITW Tekna) or a smaller Devilbiss spot repair gun. These are both HVLP gravity feed. You can buy other brands at nearly 1/10th the price of the DeVilbiss but for seriously great results, the price tag is warranted. Pot feed units are really for shooting upside down, or in close quarters where the paint cup is remote from the gun itself.

    I also have some older siphon feed guns - even a nice little pint cup one from Sears - that work well. I find the siphon feed can achieve better atomization simply due to how it mixes sprayable material with air. But generally HVLP is the way to go.

    Edit: yes you are right, pot fed systems do waste a lot of material. I only used them a couple times to paint aircraft interiors where space constraints dictated their use.

    #4 2 years ago

    Thanks for the response everyone. . Sorry if it seemed snotty to ask for opinions of people with a lot of experience- I thought about that before hitting send on the first post—- I don’t feel like any experience gained using only a single product is super useful if your trying to decide what the best possible type is out of a field of many, so was not super interested in getting a ton of basically random answers based upon a bunch of people like me with experience with one or two items. Bottom line, I have been doing this for years and have sprayed a few playfields and I did not trust myself- so don’t feel bad.

    I will for sure look at the spot repair gun by DeVilbiss, I am assuming it’s just a capacity thing and the gun is just a little smaller but works more or less the same as their production guns.

    I kinda like the idea of a siphon and a small cup but not sure how available this type of gun is but going to look now that it’s been mentioned. Not being able to spill clear all over would be nice are they also HVLP? Seems like probably not and that finish quality would be harder so I am thinking this is a no for me... maybe they were an older type of system, not sure why I got that from the response, but curious if they were to be endorsed for playfield work.

    Anyhow, as for Harbor Feeight, I used to shop there and I still own some of their tools, but have had way to many experiences where the tool basically falls apart in my hands. I want to be the issue if there are problems, my patience level for the other side of the coin just does not exist anymore.

    Thanks for the advice!

    #5 2 years ago

    Im not sure if my opinion is what you're looking for as I've only cleared about a dozen playfields but I do paint for a living and I spray clear every day.
    I never see anyone using a syphon fed gun, gravity fed is the way to go. Personally I prefer sata but I have switched to iwata because the paint transfer efficiency is so much better. Its amazing how little clear these guns use and they spray well at a much lower pressure (as low as 16 lbs). As far as cups we use 3m PPS system instead of plastic or aluminum cups but im not sure thats cost effective for occasional use.

    #6 2 years ago
    Quoted from bam10:

    Im not sure if my opinion is what you're looking for as I've only cleared about a dozen playfields but I do paint for a living and I spray clear every day.
    I never see anyone using a syphon fed gun, gravity fed is the way to go. Personally I prefer sata but I have switched to iwata because the paint transfer efficiency is so much better. Its amazing how little clear these guns use and they spray well at a much lower pressure (as low as 16 lbs). As far as cups we use 3m PPS system instead of plastic or aluminum cups but im not sure thats cost effective for occasional use.

    Which Iwata gun do you use?

    #7 2 years ago

    If you havent painted with a hvlp spray gun before with some practice you can get pretty good results with a harbour freight hvlp gun, I have one that I use for spraying water base paints and polyurethane clear on wood and have used it on automotive paints also but have a better gun that I use for automotive painting.

    #8 2 years ago

    #

    Quoted from bam10:Im not sure if my opinion is what you're looking for as I've only cleared about a dozen playfields but I do paint for a living and I spray clear every day..

    Your opinion is exactly what I was hoping to get- I don’t think spraying a playfield is the important part, I was hoping people like you who use this equipment daily for whatever the purpose would chime in with insight. Thank YOU!

    So time for the stupid questions, does a gun that shoots well at a lower PSI use less air. Seems like it might but it’s not true that volume and PSI are the same so .... gotta ask and then gotta ask, should we care about this and does it somehow tell us something about performance. Does 2 part clear atomize better at a certain PSI or are all guns different.

    Any recommendations would be taken seriously, so if you or others care to elaborate at greater depth in what you would pick from your tool box or buy to get a quality gun to just do pinball stuff and other small projects... ears open.

    Thanks again to all for chiming in. If you spray clear as part of your job your infinitely more qualified than I and I consider you a pro.

    #9 2 years ago

    Great topic, as I'm looking for a new HVLP gun myself.

    #10 2 years ago
    Quoted from pinheadpierre:

    Which Iwata gun do you use?

    The lph 400 is still a great gun. They have the newer bigger thing out now but someone who doesn’t spray every day will never know the difference.
    Not every gun sprays good at the same pressure, I don’t feel like 16psi is the sweet spot but it works ok. You probably use a little less air at lower pressure but even more noticeable is less overspray.

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    #11 2 years ago

    BAM10 - what tip and needle size do you typically use?

    #12 2 years ago
    Quoted from SilverWings:

    BAM10 - what tip and needle size do you typically use?

    1.2 is probably best. I wouldn’t go over 1.3.
    Just to clarify, everything I’ve said applies to clearcoat.

    #13 2 years ago

    Read on the air cap , it usually tells you the psi for that gun. Iwata hvlp is 16 psi, with the trigger pulled , Sata hvlp is 28 psi with the trigger pulled. 1.3 or 1.4 tip for most clears.
    The gun will produce 10 psi at the air cap when you follow the input air pressure , that's the max allowed by EPA.
    Guns, devilbiss tekna is the best value out there, get a pro-lite kit and it comes with a couple different tips . Cheap hf will do fine though to be honest .
    Dry air is important , so have a airline dryer of some sort off your compressor .
    If money is no object I'd buy a Sata 5000 RP 1.3 for clear and have a fantastic gun. But that's overkill for sure . That gun is 30 psi because it's not a true hvlp.
    also, most noobies don't clean the gun well enough after using, so clean it , break it apart and clean again, and blow air through until cleaning solvent is dried out . Usually lacquer thinner is used for cleaning.
    JP

    #14 2 years ago

    So for the Tekana Pro Lite. The kits seem to come in two flavors. One termed an RP kit has the “TE” caps in a TE10 and TE20 I think this is cat #703566. You can also buy a kit with a TE10 and HV30 cap and is described as an RP/HVLP kit where the HV30 cap is the HVLP cap. Seems like many use the TE guns to shoot clear but not sure I am understanding why if the HV30 is advertised for clear coat. Also, both kits come with a few different tip sizes. I see two or three caps and two or three tips and suddenly I have 9 ways to use the gun, and gun settings to further modify each of those. To be honest this sounds overly complex. Is it necessary to adapt the gun for different materials, eg base coat or color or primer vs clear? Do You really need 9 different potential set ups...

    To contrast, the Iwata LPH-400 has no cap options and you can buy a variety of tip sizes. I like simplicity, I like this gun for this reason, and it’s been around a very long time and still in wide use... is this gun somehow less versatile than the Tekna or is it perhaps a better design and gun settings allow you to compensate for material viscosity and density?

    Finally, seems like RP and HVLP are almost the same but RP may be slightly higher pressure. What gives, should I retitle thread to add HVLP/RP. Seems like some of the recommendations are really RP spray guns.

    I am going to wait until everyone has a say before I ask more Qs, but so far seems like Tekna and Iwata are both very high quality products and both are rather expensive

    As usual... Turns out the “cheap” industrial compressor I got that motivated me to move ahead and replace the old one will en up, as usual, being a not so cheap addition to the shop

    #15 2 years ago

    I’ve never used the tekna so it’s hard to comment, I’ve heard it’s a good gun. I would think that the air cap, nozzle and needle would be matched so only 3 combinations? Maybe Joey can comment.
    The real difference with rp vs hvlp is that the rp has a good enough transfer efficiency to be exempt from the rules requiring hvlp, it’s considered compliant so legal in areas requiring hvlp. So I understand, correct me if that’s incorrect.

    1 year later
    #16 8 months ago

    Anyone used an Iwata LPH-80? It has very low CFM requirements.

    #17 8 months ago

    If you are just clearing pfs or other small surfaces, you do not need a large capacity or high cfm compressor. A small pancake style compressor will not even need to kick back on to refill itself while applying a coat.
    Those ratings are for if you are doing a car or other large job
    And the harbor freight gun will do just as good a job in a beginners hand. Buy 1and practice.

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