(Topic ID: 157369)

Sonic Super Straight - Continuity Everywhere - Danger Will Robinson?

By jackblotto

5 years ago



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  • 9 posts
  • 4 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by jrpinball
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#1 5 years ago

So I have another post on this game trying to figure out why some lights under the playfield are not lit. Tested bulbs and not an issue. Don't think it's the sockets either, yet. Started this thread separately because I am concerned about what I found doing a test on continuity in the lower cabinet. Hoping I'm just not understanding something here.

Was doing a rudimentary test to see if I could figure out where the wires are going from a couple of the sockets where the light is not on when it should be. When trying to do this via a continuity test with my multimeter I couldn't find where the wires are running. The reason, maybe I'm dumb or something, but when I clamp or touch the wire at the socket and then to where I think the wire runs to it shows good continuity, but then I touched a couple of other switches and they also showed continuity with the lamp socket. Tried another multimeter and same thing. For fun, I tested a fuse installed in the lower cabinet fuse block. It shows continuity, which is good. Then I touch one end of the fuse with one probe and a couple of the other fuses with the other probe and they shows continuity as well. So, maybe I have found the other end of the wire coming from the lamp socket, but now I'm concerned. I can touch a blade on most switches with a probe and another blade on a switch on the other side of the cabinet with the other probe and same thing. Again, tried this with a different multimeter and same thing as well. Game is off during the test, unplugged too. No, not testing on the ground wires either, at lest I don't think I am.

Now I am a little tired and hoping I'm just being silly, but what the heck?? Is there something dangerous going on? The game actually works pretty well, save a number of lights and maybe the Advance Bonus. Maybe some other things too, but nothing seems REALLY wrong.

Thanks, David

#2 5 years ago

Hi David
testing for continuity can often give the result "continuity" - Yes, but "all around through the windings in the transformer. To get a accurate result You should unsolder the wire(s) at one side of "What You want to test". This is the hard way, but gives 100% "true" result.
Another way is looking at the schema - is at least one switch (on the way all-around) truely open ? Maybe sneak-in a stripe of paper between switchblades to have THIS switch truely open --- then check for continuity.

ipdb.org has not a schema "Super Straight" -> I look at schema "Faces": http://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=806 -> schema-A-2,3 B-2,3 -> the "Game-Over-Lite (GOL)" HAS connection when the Game-Over-Relay is tripped (in state "Game-Over") --- the "Player-Up Lites (PUL)" at this time have NO connection. So when You check for continuity these Lites You EITHER have GOL OR PUL - or the switch in the Game-Over-Relay is faulty.

"Some lights under the playfield are not lit": Look here (the Backbox): http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=2449&picno=55537 -> to the right of "Score-Reels of player-3" I see two lamps, the "left side" of the lamps are connected by a bare wire --- the "right side" of the lamps also. It is common to have insulated wires to a place - and the lamps in this area then are connected by such bare wires - maybe on one side - mybe on both sides.
Question: Are the "not-lit" lights near to each other ? Greetings Rolf

#3 5 years ago

Hi Rolf, thanks for jumping in here!

"Continuity" - interesting, never have seen this wacky behavior, but haven't been doing this long. I did try separating switch blades and it seemed like I was still getting positive continuity. Let me poke around this again and check out the GOL and PUL as you suggest and report back.

"Some lights under the playfield are not lit" - so the first set of lights I am debugging are in the same area in the lower playfield, the bonus section 1 - 10. The sockets have a bare wires connected to all of them at the base and then "different" insulated wires to each at the top. The way I understand this is that general illumination lights sometimes are connected the way you describe and what shows in the picture you pointed to. For "feature" lights though (think I am using the right terms here) like the bonus lights have a bare wire which I believe is the ground braid and another wire specific to that feature light so that when you do "something" while playing you hit that feature and the light comes on. Again, I may be way off-base here and not using the right terms. With SS games each of those insulated wires would end up on a lamp board I think. On the EMs, not sure. Assuming they end up at a switch or stepper unit or ??

Sorry for the rudimentary questions, trying to find my way.

Cheers, D

#4 5 years ago

Hi Jack
Rolf is right, continuity is a tough way to troubleshoot an EM.
The problem you are having is due to the transformer,"a long rolled up wire". coils, "same thing", and bulbs, "test the same both ways"
a better way, is to do "hot" testing.
The bulbs will most likely have a common "ground" if you will.
testing one bulb to a switch, will read through ALL the bulbs on that common line, and can give false reading.
especially if one shud be on at the time.
So... get you a 5-6 volt wall wart, and use it to supply power to a bulb, then use the other end to trace backwards to its switch.
This is a MUCH better way to test EM machines.
The same goes for a coil, use a 12-30 volt wall wart, "assuming of course, you cannot use the transformer" for power.
clip one end to the BLACK/common return of a coil, and use the other end to trace backwards through the switches.

#5 5 years ago

Hi David
Your post-3 is correct - I am German speaking so sometimes I struggle / search for "correct terms" - I also call them "feature lights. When we look at "feature lights" they may have "Wire-Yellow" on one side - or: They have a bare wire connecting a couple of things - follow the bare wire to left and right -> somewhere You will see "Wire-Yellow" is soldered-on.

Sonic are clones of Williams pins, look at http://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=1251 -> schema -> the transformer at B,C,D-1. 24 VAC is "Outside <-> Middle" and 6 VAC is "other Outside <-> Middle". Very often williams refers to "Ground / grounded wire" meaning "Middle" - where Wire(s)-Yellow are soldered-on. This is NOT correct (but used) - "Ground / grounded" to me is "connection to Water / Earth - so "faulty current" is sent to earth - not doing harm to a person working on the pin.

When a couple of "feature lights" do not work: I would follow bare wires (soldered-on) to the left and to the right -> has "Wire-Yellow" broken-off ? Greetings Rolf

#6 5 years ago

Not sure I follow this very well. First, what is a wall wart? Then if I use it to power a bulb, do you mean separate from the socket under the playfield? Some troubleshooting techniques still elude me, lead me to the "well" please

Thanks, D

"So... get you a 5-6 volt wall wart, and use it to supply power to a bulb, then use the other end to trace backwards to its switch.
This is a MUCH better way to test EM machines.
The same goes for a coil, use a 12-30 volt wall wart, "assuming of course, you cannot use the transformer" for power.
clip one end to the BLACK/common return of a coil, and use the other end to trace backwards through the switches."

#7 5 years ago
Quoted from jackblotto:

First, what is a wall wart?

It's a big junk store for dyslexics!

#8 5 years ago
Quoted from jrpinball:

It's a big junk store for dyslexics!

Good answer jr!
wall wart is a small transformer with plug prongs on it.
like your cell phone charger.
the transformer steps down the voltage to some smaller amount.
they have 2 wires commin off them to the device.
you cut the small plug off, strip the wires back, and touch the wires to the bulb socket.

#9 5 years ago
Quoted from Dr_of_Style:

Good answer jr!
wall wart is a small transformer with plug prongs on it.
like your cell phone charger.
the transformer steps down the voltage to some smaller amount.
they have 2 wires commin off them to the device.
you cut the small plug off, strip the wires back, and touch the wires to the bulb socket.

That must be a regional slang term because I've never heard it before.

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