(Topic ID: 160262)

soldering


By Luppin

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 23 posts
  • 20 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by ArcadiusMaximus
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

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    Kelly_Forceps_4b5df05c231f3_(resized).jpg
    third_hand_(resized).jpg
    3rd_hand.jpg

    #1 3 years ago

    hi,

    I am not a total newbie, but almost ...

    I made dozens of soldering for my machines: simply, wires to be soldered on switches. Somehow, it happens quite often on my machines. I always managed to do it, although it is often a struggle for me. My question is regarding how to set up the wires before the actual soldering.

    Basically, I have to keep in my hand the soldering iron (right hand). In the left hand the wire to be soldered, that need to be brought carefully in the right spot on the switch. The problem is I would need a third hand (or a second person) to place the solder itself and move it away at the right time..

    Since I do not have a third hand, I always have to play with the wire and the solder with the same hand, and it's very difficult. I always need several attempts, until I luckily manage to do the work with the right timing with everything in the right place: a struggle!

    Is there some technique or tool that can facilitate this process?

    #2 3 years ago

    I tend to get solder started on the wire itself, by holding the wire and solder in left hand, and heat the wire from underneath and let the solder soak into the end of the wire. It seems to make it easier for getting the wire onto the contact point. After the wire is on the contact, I'll try to smooth over the solder, and add more as necessary.

    Depending on the age some solder takes significantly more contact time with iron to get mold-able, so the addition of new solder to the wire seems to help that as well.

    If the contact doesn't already have solder, as in a new contact, I'll put solder on that end as well.

    I'm far from a pro, but that's what has helped me.

    #3 3 years ago

    Put solder on the wire and lug first, then with your fingers a few inches away on the insulation, hold the wire against the switch lug, touch with solder iron, spit on fingers too cool.

    #4 3 years ago

    Press the wire to the solder roll with one finger, between pointer finger and thumb supply the solder.
    This way you even have one hand free to make a picture.
    3rd_hand.jpg

    #5 3 years ago

    here's your third (fourth, fifth, and sixth) hand...

    third_hand_(resized).jpg

    #6 3 years ago

    Good advices thanks! Probably its also what I wasmending up doing, without knowing: I was trying several times, and in the meanwhile fresh solder was being added separately to the wire and to the lug, and finally they managed to glue more easily.

    #7 3 years ago

    Just saw the pics... Even better!

    #8 3 years ago

    when all else fails, hold the wires on with forceps!
    Kelly_Forceps_4b5df05c231f3_(resized).jpg

    #9 3 years ago

    Depends what you are soldering and whether you are going over old solder or soldering new parts.

    First, a couple of useful tools. 1, a solder sucker and 2, some rosin flux:

    amazon.com link »

    amazon.com link »

    If you're reworking an old connection, it's best to apply fresh solder first then use the solder sucker to remove it. This cleans the connection.

    It's always best to make a mechanical connection first. For example, making a hook connection by putting the wire through the hole of a coil lug and bending it around. Doing this usually allows you to use one hand to hold the soldering iron and the other to apply the solder.

    If you can't make a mechanical connection, that's when the flux is used. First apply enough solder to the things you want to connect to form the final joint. Next apply a small amount of flux to each side of the connection. Hopefully at least one side of the connection is stable so that you can use one hand to hold the joint together and the other to apply the soldering iron. The flux will ensure a good solder joint.

    You can do the same thing without the flux but it may result in a poor solder joint that won't last.

    #10 3 years ago

    I was taught that solder is for 'conductivity' - not for 'connectivity'.

    Also, check out this thread for the best soldering guide I've yet seen:

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/terrybs-soldering-guide-part-1

    -1
    #11 3 years ago

    I often will use one hand to assist in joining the wires etc and then put a long strand of small gauge sold in my mouth and solder that way. It has worked well for me. Just a suggestion

    #12 3 years ago
    Quoted from GPS:

    I often will use one hand to assist in joining the wires etc and then put a long strand of small gauge sold in my mouth and solder that way. It has worked well for me. Just a suggestion

    Probably not an issue if only doing it once and a while but the solder is made out of lead.

    #13 3 years ago

    Three steps. Put solder on the lug, put solder on the wire, then heat the two together. The technique is something you learn after doing it a bunch. A good iron also makes a difference.

    #14 3 years ago

    Irons should have adjustable heat settings in the area of 600 to 800 degrees. Also tinning the wires then bending with needle nose pliers to form a hook makes joinin wires easier. That's one way anyway.

    #15 3 years ago

    Always make a habit of pre tinning the wires before you solder them together. This is the first thing you should do always before you solder.

    #16 3 years ago

    Flux, flux, flux! Its like a magnet for solder, at least the old dangerous solder that I use. LOL
    All you need is a little bit on each part to be soldered. I always prep wire with flux then put a little solder on it. Sucks it right on there. Then a dab on the part to be soldered to. A little heat and good to go!

    #17 3 years ago

    I miss the good old paste flux ....

    #18 3 years ago

    Forceps? Dem ain't forceps...Sometin' about a clip from what I recollect...

    #19 3 years ago

    I didn't really learn to solder until I started maintaining/fixing my machines. Circuit boards on the work table are one thing, but soldering on the machine is another. If you own machines, soldering is a skill you need to learn. Can be tricky sometimes. I do like solder w/lead better than the new stuff. The leaded stuff flows better and is easier to work with for me. I need some braid and tips before I run out. Can't find it locally anymore. Will have to order some soon. Considering a nice solder sucker too........

    #20 3 years ago

    I've had my troubles learning, but enjoy the struggle. I've upgraded my equipment, but there is no substitution for practice. I don't do it very often so I've haven gotten over the "hump" so to speak. I've only recently started using flux and it's already made a big difference for me. My first playfield swap is coming up and I know that will be the point where I get it down finally. There are some good tips in this thread.

    I haven't use forceps/hemostats to solder. They are really hand for grabbing stuff stuck under ramps etc.

    #21 3 years ago

    Make a mechanical connection with the wire first and it becomes easy. No tinning required. Usually solder lugs under the PF have a hole in them. Clear that hole out and thread the wire through and bend it over. Now you have a nice strong connection, just sticking it on the lug and tacking it down with solder is not as reliable.

    2 weeks later
    #22 3 years ago
    Quoted from Luppin:

    hi,
    I am not a total newbie, but almost ...
    I made dozens of soldering for my machines: simply, wires to be soldered on switches. Somehow, it happens quite often on my machines. I always managed to do it, although it is often a struggle for me. My question is regarding how to set up the wires before the actual soldering.
    Basically, I have to keep in my hand the soldering iron (right hand). In the left hand the wire to be soldered, that need to be brought carefully in the right spot on the switch. The problem is I would need a third hand (or a second person) to place the solder itself and move it away at the right time..
    Since I do not have a third hand, I always have to play with the wire and the solder with the same hand, and it's very difficult. I always need several attempts, until I luckily manage to do the work with the right timing with everything in the right place: a struggle!
    Is there some technique or tool that can facilitate this process?

    Get some alligator clips and a pair of locking forceps ("roach clips"); they help a lot with the holding part.

    In addition *use good solder*; I'm partial to Kester 245. A pound spool will last you a long time. It's very fine but that makes it suitable for both wiring use and on PCBs.

    If you don't have a temperature controlled iron -- buy one.

    If you're re-soldering something you removed while you have the wire and item separated use some braid to remove any excessive amount of old solder. It helps a great deal as you can then make the mechanical connection first, then solder it. Solder will not hold as a mechanical connection if there is high vibration; the joint will crack and then you have intermittent problems.

    #23 3 years ago
    Quoted from barakandl:

    Make a mechanical connection with the wire first and it becomes easy. No tinning required. Usually solder lugs under the PF have a hole in them. Clear that hole out and thread the wire through and bend it over. Now you have a nice strong connection, just sticking it on the lug and tacking it down with solder is not as reliable.

    This. There's a hole there for a reason

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