(Topic ID: 249509)

So I don't burn down the house...


By Scoot

7 months ago



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  • 15 posts
  • 7 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 7 months ago by razorsedge
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#1 7 months ago

I am trying to add a service outlet to one of my pinball machines (it was missing) and want to make sure I solder the correct wires. My other pins have green, white, and black wires on the fuse side but this one does not. Can someone help me so I don't blow myself up? I know the green goes on the grounding tab in the middle. The other two am not entirely sure.

20190815_190314 (resized).jpg
#3 7 months ago

Black attaches to brown (hot)
White attaches to blue (neutral)
Green goes to green/yellow (ground)

#4 7 months ago

just attach to the black and white wires.?.?.
You don't need that to be fused.

#5 7 months ago
Quoted from wdennie:

just attach to the black and white wires.?.?.
You don't need that to be fused.

I think you’re looking at the circuit incorrectly. The white and black wires are on the load side of the line filter(After the fuse.) Connecting the service outlet there would add the fuse and the filter to the circuit.

The brown, blue, and green/yellow wires come from the wall. That is where I would attach the service outlet.

#6 7 months ago

Sorry, every 110 power cord I ever seen has black 4 power, white 4 common, green 4 ground.
So your saying the power coming in are the black, blue and yellow green striped ones?

#7 7 months ago
Quoted from wdennie:

So your saying the power coming in are the black, blue and yellow green striped ones?

Not unusual color codes for electronic equipment.

10
#8 7 months ago

In this case the power coming in is brown, blue, and green/yellow.

It is a common color code for single phase wiring in the EU and other countries. In the US Black, white and green is the standard color code. However I have seen the EU color code used in many electronics.

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#9 7 months ago

Interesting.
Never worked on a EU. game.

#10 7 months ago
Quoted from wdennie:

Interesting.
Never worked on a EU. game.

I see it in a lot of computer equipment in the U.S.

#11 7 months ago

Thanks for the responses! Wired up and working great!

#12 7 months ago

Black always used to be Neutral here in Oz, with Active as Red. Obviously this was changed along with standards decades ago to avoid confusion, for both reasons of international uniformity as well as safety contingencies aroud undiagnosed colour blindness. Plenty of equipment still exists with this scheme though, of course. Just some trivia

*Brown/Blue/GreenYellow is now our standard.

#13 7 months ago
Quoted from razorsedge:

Black always used to be Neutral here in Oz, with Active as Red. Obviously this was changed along with standards decades ago to avoid confusion, for both reasons of international uniformity as well as safety contingencies aroud undiagnosed colour blindness. Plenty of equipment still exists with this scheme though, of course. Just some trivia
*Brown/Blue/GreenYellow is now our standard.

I know my machine is a reimport as the coin door has three coin slots and the label shows the voltage as 220v. Does the color combo I have mean that it came from Australia, or is this standard for many countries? I have always wondered why the coin door is different. Why more slots?

#14 7 months ago
Quoted from chubtoad13:

In this case the power coming in is brown, blue, and green/yellow.
It is a common color code for single phase wiring in the EU and other countries. In the US Black, white and green is the standard color code. However I have seen the EU color code used in many electronics.[quoted image]

Please draw all my schematics thanks. That’s the most understandable one I’ve seen in pinball

#15 7 months ago
Quoted from Scoot:

I know my machine is a reimport as the coin door has three coin slots and the label shows the voltage as 220v. Does the color combo I have mean that it came from Australia, or is this standard for many countries? I have always wondered why the coin door is different. Why more slots?

I think now we match europe, also 220-240v @ 50hz in common.

As far as I understand 3 slot for europe in the day, more coin variety with only one coin mechanicals to utilise. In the 80s we had mostly 2 slot it seems (20c & $1). Our 50c were always much too large. In the 90's we got $2 coins, but by then digital mechs still meant 2 slot was plenty. In general through 90s B/W in Oz 3 slot seems to mean euro import, 2 slot for Oz delivered. That's just my observation and info.

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