(Topic ID: 306191)

So games are now $10K - $20K, are people still paying with cash?

By kevmad

7 months ago


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  • Latest reply 7 months ago by cottonm4
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    There are 162 posts in this topic. You are on page 3 of 4.
    #101 7 months ago
    Quoted from EJS:

    There were some pleas to get rid of the 50 and 100 a few years ago because they claimed they were mostly used for criminal activity. Bad logic and obviously didn’t stick. So we haven’t been thinking in that direction.

    OMG can you imagine buying a Pirates CE in all 20’s? Talk about a phat stack lol

    #102 7 months ago

    So... I saw someone saw that PayPal had claw back? Is this only if you have or add purchase protection? I have used PayPal to buy sell games several times. This said I have not read thru there terms of service. I’m pretty sure that if you send the money friends and family and it’s accepted buy the party receiving the transfer it is unequivocally!

    Most of my career has been commercial title insurance, commercial real estate. Wire transfer is the standard in the industry for moving money. I have news for you guys.....Wire transfer can be reversed!!!!

    #103 7 months ago
    Quoted from chuckwurt:

    No. You are just being forced to do what you should’ve already been doing. Reporting sales. Sales are offset by expenses. You sell a game via PayPal for 12k? You get to report expenses to offset that sale. Buy a game for 12k and sell it for 12k? Zero tax owed.

    Oh I was more thinking about my business. I report every dime I make to the IRS. I was wondering if I was going to be double taxed if I used a square POS. I don’t have money for pinball.

    #104 7 months ago
    Quoted from bigdaddy07:

    Isn't the burden of proof on us? We need receipts of transactions ect to prove the purchase and cost? That's easy when buying from a distro, but a little more difficult for parking lot trades or cash transactions from individuals. I'm not accountant by any stretch, so help me understand.

    The best way to determine value is from a sale.

    You buy a game for 1k. Trade it straight up for another game with no cash changing hands. The new game is worth 1k too. Sell that later for 10k, you have 9k of taxable income technically. No one ever reports that stuff. This new rule is to help hold those types of transactions accountable.

    But yes. That original 1k spent needs to be supported somehow. Communication, bank activity, or you can get some sort of value from that time from other public listings of the game or an appraisal from a distributor or retailer of some kind.

    #105 7 months ago

    wow so many rich people on pinside

    #106 7 months ago
    Quoted from shlt_thunder:

    Oh I was more thinking about my business. I report every dime I make to the IRS. I was wondering if I was going to be double taxed if I used a square POS. I don’t have money for pinball.

    No you’re not. The only kind of “double taxing” that ever happens is if you’re a sole proprietor and you have to pay stuff like payroll taxes for the ER and the EE and self employment tax.

    #107 7 months ago

    If you do a lot of buying and selling and don't want to run afoul of the tax man...January 1st would be a great time to sign up for a Quickbooks online account. Don't forget you can deduct things related to your sold goods like shipping expenses, packing materials, mileage, etc. Trying to keep track of everything on your own can turn into a nightmare at the end of the tax year.

    #108 7 months ago
    Quoted from robotron:

    wow so many rich people on pinside

    It's all relative. I've bought/traded 30ish pins in the past 3 years. Sometimes people come to my house and say something along the lines of "wow, what do you do for a living?". Sometimes I go to other people's houses and say, "wow... what do you do for a living?".

    The biggest collection I ever saw (80+ high end pins plus several original prototypes) was someone who ran a windshield repair business of all things.

    As to the paying with cash. The last pin I bought I bought cash. However, I always check google maps. I'm not going to show up to a row house in Baltimore with that kind of cash. However, I'll a nice neighborhood with no worries. I've done paypal or check a few times, but only with established pinsiders I semi-trust. If someone shows up to a cash sale and springs a check or paypal on you that is a huge red flag.

    I sold a pinbot yesterday on short notice and took paypal. I had two offers for the exact same amount over the course of an hour ($150 less than asking plus some labor). One person asked if they could use paypal and assured me that if you used friends and family the money could not be clawed back. I had not asked about it and that was a huge red flag. The other guy was off of pinside with feedback and a history on the forum. Guess who got the pin.

    #109 7 months ago
    Quoted from metallik:

    The $600 limit was revised to $10K.

    They raised it to $10k in *combined* annual transactions. So basically everyone in this hobby gets reported to the IRS every year.

    It was sneaky AF to say they were changing it from $600 (single transaction) to $10k combined annual (basically $800 a month in withdrawal/deposits).

    #110 7 months ago

    As chuckwurt and some others have stated - this is nothing new. The 1099-K is only going to be one half of of the documentation when you sell a machine if it gets sent to you. No different than 1099s you get for stock sales and it looks like you sold millions of dollars of stocks - but in reality you spent millions of dollars + ten bucks so you have a loss.

    The IRS wants to crack down on Internet sales where companies aren't reporting sales. It is bigger than pinball . If you end up getting a letter from the IRS it probably will be a substantiation letter because you forgot to show the "expenses" part of your ownership of the pinball machine/stock/etc and they just want to see it reported with the basis for what you spent for the sale.

    For pinball distributors this will be more of a thing because they will have to acknowledge to the IRS as the seller of the machine, hey received $9,000 for a machine. In your case as an owner/buyer, save the documentation you get when you buy the machine. When you sell the machine you have proof of your basis and date of purchase and can use that to offset sales. Double check with your tax person on this stuff as well if unsure . The above is not tax advice.

    #111 7 months ago
    Quoted from RobertWinter:

    Cash if picked up in person.
    Wire Transfer if shipping.

    Curious, if you take wire transfer in some situations (shipping) why not all? Is it a timeframe thing?

    The last car I bought I brought up to the seller that I'll pay cash. As she was counting the money she wanted to know why I wanted a cash deal. I said because I can't wire money on a Sunday. Basically, paying cash eliminated barriers.

    Those that are weary giving your bank account number for a wire transfer. Have you ever written checks? Your account number is on those.

    #112 7 months ago
    Quoted from JT-Pinball:

    This is only if they find your drugs or guns with you and the money. My advice is if your traveling with large sums of cash to buy a game leave your guns and drugs at home!

    Yeah but if you look into the cases they use those powers, they don't actually follow those rules. They can take your money, whenever they dang want to.

    Heck the government can just shut down your bank accounts if they don't like you either for that matter.

    #113 7 months ago
    Quoted from RyanStl:

    Curious, if you take wire transfer in some situations (shipping) why not all? Is it a timeframe thing?

    That’s a risk yes. But if they initiate during the week and during work hours it should clear same day.

    #114 7 months ago
    Quoted from FlippyD:

    Heck the government can just shut down your bank accounts if they don't like you either for that matter.

    Those are called sanctions! Ask the Iranians how that works!

    These are all good points for decentralized finance. It’s like this... the government printed the money. It’s their money! It’s only yours to use as they say.

    #115 7 months ago
    Quoted from FlippyD:

    Yeah but if you look into the cases they use those powers, they don't actually follow those rules. They can take your money, whenever they dang want to.

    Yeah, it is like if you get stopped by a cop for speeding. If you look suspicious to the cop and he asks if he can search your car and you say "no, not without a warrant" you will be getting a tow the local cop shop and they will rip your car apart. And then we will be reading about a huge drug bust made on the side of the highway.

    If the cop asks if you are carrying gun and you say "no" you better hope he believes you. Or you are going downtown.

    Same with large cash. "Hmmm. No one carries that kind of money unless they are doing drug deals. We are taking your cash. Try to get it back, sucker."

    If you say you are not carrying large money and the cop does not believe you and wants to search your car, and you just happen to be carrying large money, you are hosed.

    https://www.aclu.org/issues/criminal-law-reform/reforming-police/asset-forfeiture-abuse

    https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=civil+asset+forfeiture+abuse&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

    You think the cops and the cities are above this kind of action?

    Wait until your pocketbook gets lightened up due to the small-town speed trap you just blew through. When it happens to you, you know immediately you have just been bent over. Once you get over the pain it just leaves you really pissed off. I got it in hick-town North Enid, Oklahoma. As I was leaving town 30 minutes later, another poor sucker was on the side of the road with the local cop writing him a ticket.

    https://www.thrillist.com/cars/nation/the-worst-speed-traps-in-every-state

    #116 7 months ago

    I've done wire transfers and cash. I paid cash when I picked up a Godzilla LE and AIQ LE a couple of weekends ago.

    #117 7 months ago
    Quoted from JT-Pinball:

    This is only if they find your drugs or guns with you and the money. My advice is if your traveling with large sums of cash to buy a game leave your guns and drugs at home!

    This is not true. Some states have outlawed the practice but there are plenty of states where simple "suspicion" by a police officer is enough to seize the cash and then you have to prove it isn't ill gotten. The practice is absurdly common

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10271747/Marine-sues-DEA-entire-life-savings-87K-confiscated-him.html

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/highway-robbers-how-trip-buy-farmland-ended-police-taking-all-n1281629

    https://ij.org/action-post/cops-seized-17-550-from-driver-never-charged-him-with-a-crime/

    #118 7 months ago

    Everyone should remember that citizens have rights when pulled over by police. If they ask to search your car or try something sneakier like "I need to take a quick look in your trunk", you should generally NOT consent to a search. Say something like "with all due respect officer, unless you have a warrant, I do not consent to any searches". If the officer persists, you might ask what reasonable articulable suspicion or probable cause he has for a search. Assuming you have nothing in plain view, like stacks of cash, drug paraphernalia, guns or ammo, etc, he will have no legal grounds for a search.

    Maintain your refusal to consent to a search and ask if you are free to go. If the police threaten to go get a search warrant, unless they really have some evidence that you are about to commit a crime, or are in the process of committing one, they are not going to get the warrant.

    They can legally search any part of your car that you can reach from the driver's seat "for officer safety" so if you are carrying cash to buy the pinball of your dreams, do not have it in the drivers seat, console, glove box, etc. They can also ask you to step out of the car and do a Terry frisk for weapons. If you get out of the car, lock the door behind you. This makes it a bit harder to suggest you have access to any area inside the car.

    If you have a locked briefcase in the car, that is an additional level of privacy that will require a warrant to be legally searched. Any illegal searches that reveal something becomes fruit of the poisonous tree and might well be inadmissible in court.

    After a period of time, they are going to have to let you go on your way or be guilty of illegal detention.

    I am not a lawyer, but this is what I have been told by one. If any lawyer types can weigh in further on this subject, I think it would be very beneficial to everyone here.
    This asset forfeiture business is bs, and the public should do everything in its power to stop it.

    #119 7 months ago

    Without side tracking this discussion too much, If I get pulled over for speeding, or some other arbitrary infraction, and a law enforcement officer asks to search my vehicle and I clearly say "No, Officer, you may not search my vehicle" (You can't refuse a search of your person), and they do, I can assure you that they will be naming that town "Grandnational007ville" in short order after my legal council is done with them.

    Police cannot create "probable cause" when there isn't any. And believe-you-me, I've heard it all: "You're vehicle matches the description of a car that just left a bank robbery! Mind if I take a quick look inside so you can be on your way?"

    Of course every situation when contact with law enforcement occurs is different, and people get themselves jammed up, when they could otherwise be driving off with nothing, a warning, or a ticket. You need to weigh "but muh rights!" with "will I be able to just drive off after the officer realizes I'm a normal, law abiding citizen, going about their mundane business" with "did I forget that I might have (or knowingly have) contraband in the vehicle, and the the nice officer will let me go for being honest with them (the latter is NEVER the right answer...)

    My humble advice? Don't have anything that could even remotely be considered "suspicious" within view of your vehicle. Carrying a substantial amount of cash? Keep it in a lockbox in the trunk, with the receipt from the bank. And travel with a discrete dash-cam that records interior audio if you're extra paranoid. Most modern vehicles now come equipped as such, and they are password protected if you are REALLY worried about corrupt leo's tampering with it.

    It's not as sexy as some other alternatives, but drive a newer, non-descript vehicle in good upkeep and the interior not filled to the roof with garbage, obey traffic laws, and be polite should you come into contact with leo on the side of the road. If you do the above, chances are 99.9999999999% you'll be able to peaceably travel wherever you want, with whatever you want, and not get hassled by "the man".

    Safe travels.

    #120 7 months ago
    Quoted from GreenMachine19:

    If you are in CT you have to be convicted of a crime to have this happen to you.
    "A criminal conviction is required prior to forfeiture, see HB 7146"

    Often in states where CAF is restricted or abolished local agencies will have the DEA adopt the case so that they can bypass state law to get your money.

    2/3rds of all assets seized and kept via CAF from 2009 to 2016 came from people who were never charged with a crime.

    #121 7 months ago
    Quoted from EJS:

    There were some pleas to get rid of the 50 and 100 a few years ago because they claimed they were mostly used for criminal activity. Bad logic and obviously didn’t stick. So we haven’t been thinking in that direction.

    At one point Bureau of Engraving and Printing did issue $500, $1,000, $5,000 and $10,000 notes.
    They were last printed in 1945, but continued to be issued until 1969.
    Their official reason for discontinuing them was "lack of use", which is probably partially true.
    These bills were intended for larger transactions that are not "everyday purchases".
    All of those denominations are still legal tender and can technically be spent, although the collector value is higher than the face value of the notes.
    I've bought and sold many $500 and $1000 dollar bills over the years, as well as a few $5,000 and $10,000 notes.
    When these bills were current most people had never seen a $5,000 or $10,000 and $500 and $1000 notes were not common use as this was a lot of money during that time period.
    I did have one client once tell me that he recalled his father showing him a $10,000 note when he was a kid and sold their family farm and they went directly to the bank with it.
    Unless you have a need to move around large amounts of cash, the larger denominations are not really that practical for everyday commerce.
    I doubt we will ever see something like those denominations again unless inflation gets really out of control.

    The BEP also printed $100,000 notes, but those were strictly used within the government and are not legal to own and they were never issued to the general public.

    #122 7 months ago

    The direction for commerce is towards paperless processing and as much as we know and love cash being king (and queen and jack and ten and ace - flush with wealth ) I think if you have good record keeping there isn't an issue dealing with wire transfers or Paypal etc if you do what banks suggest (and we incorporate in our own dealings) KYC - Know Your Customer or Client.

    Try to do business with people who are trustworthy and be careful if carrying cash.

    #123 7 months ago
    Quoted from Grandnational007:

    Without side tracking this discussion too much,

    Sounds like relevant discussion to me. Pinballers hauling lots of cash to go buy a pin need to be aware of the laws, and the lack of laws, or lack of obeying the law by the leo's (crooked cops and towns ).

    right now we are all over the place with this. Some of us say "watch out". Others say "don't sweat it". Which is correct?

    The scary part is if "they" do take your money, you will spend a lot of time and money trying to get YOUR money back. If you are 3 states away for your home state and this happens you are at a huge disadvantage before you even try to get your money back.

    #124 7 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    Sounds like relevant discussion to me. Pinballers hauling lots of cash to go buy a pin need to be aware of the laws, and the lack of laws, or lack of obeying the law by the leo's (crooked cops and towns ).
    right now we are all over the place with this. Some of us say "watch out". Others say "don't sweat it". Which is correct?
    The scary part is if "they" do take your money, you will spend a lot of time and money trying to get YOUR money back. If you are 3 states away for your home state and this happens you are at a huge disadvantage before you even try to get your money back.

    I think being aware of the laws is just as important as being aware of the scams that are out there.
    Both are things that should be discussed and people should be aware of for a variety of reasons and their possible implications.

    #125 7 months ago
    Quoted from cottonm4:

    Sounds like relevant discussion to me. Pinballers hauling lots of cash to go buy a pin need to be aware of the laws, and the lack of laws, or lack of obeying the law by the leo's (crooked cops and towns ).
    right now we are all over the place with this. Some of us say "watch out". Others say "don't sweat it". Which is correct?
    The scary part is if "they" do take your money, you will spend a lot of time and money trying to get YOUR money back. If you are 3 states away for your home state and this happens you are at a huge disadvantage before you even try to get your money back.

    Easy peasy enough...

    Should a person ever be pulled over by LEO, which you shouldn't in the first place if the person followed my advice above...

    Assuming you have a "large amount" of your own cash in the vehicle, and you were pulled over for some arbitrary infraction:

    LEO: "do you have a large amount of cash in the vehicle?"

    Pinballbuyer: "No"

    LEO: Either "OK"

    or, "Do you mind if I take a quick look around in your vehicle?"

    PB: "I do mind officer, I'm on my way to my relative's wedding/funeral/anniversary/etc. and do not want to be late."

    LEO: "It'll only take a couple of seconds, you don't have anything to hide do you? You'll be right on your way after I take a quick looksie..."

    PB: "As I said before officer, I do not consent to any searches. I don't want to be late to xxx event that I just told you.

    LEO will now either send you on your way, give you a verbal warning/written warning/ticket, or hold you at the roadside for 10 minutes while they fully run your reg/license/tags/insurance, which should all be clean. Then send you on your way with one of three above, assuming you didn't escalate the interaction any further.

    My advice still stands: Don't invite the man into your life, and if you do, don't ever admit that you're guilty of anything.

    We're talking about being pulled over for speeding, having a taillight out, etc, which for the most part, constitute minor, non-arrestable offenses; not being caught red-handed at the scene of a major felony.

    The above should not be construed in any way to constitute legal advice.

    #126 7 months ago

    I have bought and sold a handful of pins over 10k. And I am packing everytime. Why take the chance. Even if its in my own garage. Better safe than sorry.

    #128 7 months ago
    Quoted from PinBallPeteFromSD:

    I have bought and sold a handful of pins over 10k. And I am packing everytime. Why take the chance. Even if its in my own garage. Better safe than sorry.

    Easier said than done when crossing state lines, or where there's no reciprocity for your state's ccw permit. I'm of the thought that they should be treated like driver's licenses (if you're responsible enough to drive in one state, you're responsible to drive in them all...), but don't even get me started on the absurdity that the "state" grants you a paper to exercise a god-given/constitutional right...

    Of course, all of this only applies to generally, law abiding citizens.

    #129 7 months ago
    Quoted from Grandnational007:

    Easy peasy enough...
    Should a person ever be pulled over by LEO, which you shouldn't in the first place if the person followed my advice above...
    Assuming you have a "large amount" of your own cash in the vehicle, and you were pulled over for some arbitrary infraction:
    LEO: "do you have a large amount of cash in the vehicle?"
    Pinballbuyer: "No"
    LEO: Either "OK"
    or, "Do you mind if I take a quick look around in your vehicle?"
    PB: "I do mind officer, I'm on my way to my relative's wedding/funeral/anniversary/etc. and do not want to be late."
    LEO: "It'll only take a couple of seconds, you don't have anything to hide do you? You'll be right on your way after I take a quick looksie..."
    PB: "As I said before officer, I do not consent to any searches. I don't want to be late to xxx event that I just told you.
    LEO will now either send you on your way, give you a verbal warning/written warning/ticket, or hold you at the roadside for 10 minutes while they fully run your reg/license/tags/insurance, which should all be clean. Then send you on your way with one of three above, assuming you didn't escalate the interaction any further.
    My advice still stands: Don't invite the man into your life, and if you do, don't ever admit that you're guilty of anything.
    We're talking about being pulled over for speeding, having a taillight out, etc, which for the most part, constitute minor, non-arrestable offenses; not being caught red-handed at the scene of a major felony.
    The above should not be construed in any way to constitute legal advice.

    That's all well and good. You just keep believing that fiction.

    Here ya go. If this does not scare you, nothing will.

    This guy, a combat veteran, got ROYALLY HOSED by the Nevada cops. Was he a fool for carrying $87,000 on him? I say he was a fool. But there is no law about carrying large money.

    IMO, any pinballer on the road to buy a pin, who is bringing cash, needs to know the risks of dealing with the cops.

    How about this instance? Flying. Not driving.

    and it looks like the Supreme Court got involved.

    I stand by my position that if you are carrying large money you are at risk of losing it.

    #130 7 months ago

    I’m not defending the actions of the cops…but he simply should have said no when they asked to toss the car. They had no probable cause to search the car, he willingly granted it. He probably thought the nice officers would let him go for being honest. And I’m not arguing that he committed a crime by carrying cash. I think it’s literal highway robbery that cops are committing in these instances.

    #131 7 months ago

    Cops will try all kinds of strategies to get you to consent to let them do a search. From threats to reverse psychology to playing on your natural desire to not be delayed. They do this because absent ras, probable cause, or plain view violations, they can't legally search your car without permission. And if they do, anything discovered will likely be tossed out in court. So learn to respectfully refuse to consent to a search and stick to your decision. Cops ate paid to look for violations of the law. They can be nice guys, even very sympathetic to your circumstances, but they are NOT your friends in a professional setting! Be polite but on your guard, even if you are innocent.

    Look up a you tube video called "do not talk to the police" by a good lawyer for some eye opening things.

    #132 7 months ago
    Quoted from sbmania:

    Although I now use a counterfeit pen detector based on a friend's recent experience.

    Yup, I recently heard a story (second hand) about counterfeit currency used in a pinball transaction. Picking up one of those pens the next time I'm at the office supply store.

    #133 7 months ago
    Quoted from sataneatscheese:

    It's all relative. I've bought/traded 30ish pins in the past 3 years. Sometimes people come to my house and say something along the lines of "wow, what do you do for a living?". Sometimes I go to other people's houses and say, "wow... what do you do for a living?".
    The biggest collection I ever saw (80+ high end pins plus several original prototypes) was someone who ran a windshield repair business of all things.

    The only way I justified spending what I do on games was choosing to drive a cheaper vehicle. I bet many who would scoff at paying these prices are driving a 30-60k vehicle around and think nothing of it. Knowing how to fix games and do a little restoration helps also on the expense, definitely not a rich person's hobby if you do it a certain way.

    #134 7 months ago
    Quoted from EJS:

    There were some pleas to get rid of the 50 and 100 a few years ago because they claimed they were mostly used for criminal activity. Bad logic and obviously didn’t stick. So we haven’t been thinking in that direction.

    Everyone knows cocaine is way better the larger the denomination you snort it with

    Quoted from JT-Pinball:

    So... I saw someone saw that PayPal had claw back? Is this only if you have or add purchase protection? I have used PayPal to buy sell games several times. This said I have not read thru there terms of service. I’m pretty sure that if you send the money friends and family and it’s accepted buy the party receiving the transfer it is unequivocally!
    Most of my career has been commercial title insurance, commercial real estate. Wire transfer is the standard in the industry for moving money. I have news for you guys.....Wire transfer can be reversed!!!!

    On paypal the buyer has a crazy amount of leeway to get their money back. There are many sellers who won't go through paypal for this very reason, clearly fraudulent returns,

    Apparently doing it as a friend or family avoids this. business transactions are subject to their rules though and that means almost always siding with the buyer.

    #135 7 months ago

    Granted that I've only made a couple of large cash pinball transactions where I had to drive as far as 5 hours to pickup, but was pretty simple for me. Took $100 bills (asked seller what they preferred first), my high capacity magazine 9mm Glock, and at no time exceeded the speed limit, ran through yellow lights, performed rolling stops, etc. - in other words, I did my best to obey all traffic laws. I also planned the trip so that I didn't have to make any stops along the way until I reached my destination. In both cases the transactions were carried out without any issues. I've had other cases where I was travelling with tens of thousands of dollars in cash over short distances, and was equally prepared and made similar accommodations with my driving and alertness.

    I understand that sometimes you may be pulled over for no fault of your own, so it is good to be prepared. However, the vast majority of the time when carrying large sums of cash the best think you can do is to be extremely aware of your surroundings at all times, keep your cool, and if you are pulled over act normal and comply with the officer's request for license and registration. If things do escalate beyond that, then some of the advice already given should be followed. Also, if you are that concerned about it then I would consider engaging legal council about the "what if" scenarios.

    #136 7 months ago
    Quoted from Anony:

    Everyone knows cocaine is way better the larger the denomination you snort it with

    I’m looking to get one of those 10k notes just for that!

    -1
    #137 7 months ago
    Quoted from Grandnational007:

    I’m not defending the actions of the cops…but he simply should have said no when they asked to toss the car. They had no probable cause to search the car, he willingly granted it. He probably thought the nice officers would let him go for being honest. And I’m not arguing that he committed a crime by carrying cash. I think it’s literal highway robbery that cops are committing in these instances.

    I stand corrected. You are pretty much spot on. The guy in the movie, his big mistake was answering the he had a lot of money. The police intimidation factor has to be immense. But you don'r have to answer the money question. I've learned a lot this afternoon.

    There are some other links but this one seems to answer all of the basic questions.

    https://www.flexyourrights.org/faqs/when-can-police-search-your-car/

    #138 7 months ago

    In case there is anyone left who hasn't seen this, this is a law professor explaining why you NEVER talk to the police. you can be 100% innocent and talk yourself into charges for something you never did, and it happens way more often than you'd think.

    #139 7 months ago

    Not that I carry a lot of cash a lot, but sometimes I do. Now you all are giving me something new to worry about I never thought of. Thanks for the anxiety boost.

    #140 7 months ago
    Quoted from Anony:

    In case there is anyone left who hasn't seen this, this is a law professor explaining why you NEVER talk to the police. you can be 100% innocent and talk yourself into charges for something you never did, and it happens way more often than you'd think.

    I've watched that before and it's worth the 45 minutes of your time. It's not only a law professor telling you to never talk to the police, but also the police tell you to never talk to the police.

    #141 7 months ago

    A sales transaction is a two way street.

    If I knew a buyer was coming to my house with a loaded gun, I wouldn't sell to him.

    #142 7 months ago
    Quoted from RTS:

    A sales transaction is a two way street.
    If I knew a buyer was coming to my house with a loaded gun, I wouldn't sell to him.

    But how would you know? Concealed is concealed.

    #143 7 months ago
    Quoted from Spyderturbo007:

    I've watched that before and it's worth the 45 minutes of your time. It's not only a law professor telling you to never talk to the police, but also the police tell you to never talk to the police.

    Yeah it's been a while since I watched it but I believe the cop says that if you're driving a car and he wanted to pull you over he just had to follow you for a while and inevitably you will break a law.

    Another great one is the JCS channel on youtube.

    https://www.youtube.com/c/JCSCriminalPsychology

    He does mini-doc style videos about interrogations and shows how good the cops are at getting people to give themselves up.

    #144 7 months ago
    Quoted from Lhyrgoif:

    In Sweden we have Swish, immediate digital transfer between bank accounts, non-reversible so zero risk as long as you see the money arrived in your account. Very convenient, used it for buying pins, cars and other expensive things.

    "Swish" in Switzerland is about the most adorable thing I've ever heard of.

    #145 7 months ago

    The above is interesting, but I have been stopped and given tickets or warnings and have been in the car when friends are stopped, and don't recall ever being asked if we had drugs/guns/cash or can we search. I suppose if someone reeked, it would be different.

    #146 7 months ago

    Many years ago I was driving at night on a lonesome highway in Portugal. I had been driving the speed limit and being safe and careful.

    At some point I passed a very slow truck. Then moments later cop lights were on behind me. I couldn't figure out what I did wrong.

    They pull me over, check documents, claim I made an illegal pass and then say "give us $200 bucks" or whatever the equivalent in euros was at the time. I pulled the money out of my wallet and they went to their car, came back with a post-it note that said "200 bucks" and left.

    I think I might have only seen those two cars that night it was so deserted on the roads... and yet... BAM gotta pay the highway man. Life lesson indeed.

    #147 7 months ago
    Quoted from FlippyD:

    Many years ago I was driving at night on a lonesome highway in Portugal. I had been driving the speed limit and being safe and careful.
    At some point I passed a very slow truck. Then moments later cop lights were on behind me. I couldn't figure out what I did wrong.
    They pull me over, check documents, claim I made an illegal pass and then say "give us $200 bucks" or whatever the equivalent in euros was at the time. I pulled the money out of my wallet and they went to their car, came back with a post-it note that said "200 bucks" and left.
    I think I might have only seen those two cars that night it was so deserted on the roads... and yet... BAM gotta pay the highway man. Life lesson indeed.

    You were shaken down by dirty cops.

    #148 7 months ago

    Sometimes I wish it was more like that around here! $200 and on your way is a lot less of a headache than some of the court situations you can find yourself in. Especially if there is corruption involved. But I'd probably end up regretting that wish in reality.

    #149 7 months ago
    Quoted from Anony:

    Sometimes I wish it was more like that around here! $200 and on your way is a lot less of a headache than some of the court situations you can find yourself in. Especially if there is corruption involved. But I'd probably end up regretting that wish in reality.

    maxresdefault (resized).jpg
    #150 7 months ago

    lol, I probably watch too much innocence project stuff but the idea of being caught up in a corrupt court sounds so much harder to deal with than just being able to pay some money on the road and go on your way.
    The flaw in this logic is thinking that the courts will somehow not be corrupt in places where you can pay off the cops. But even then, having the option to pay your way out of it still seems preferable to serving life in prison for something that you didn't do and which the state has proof that you didn't do it but refuses to enter it into the courts or allow you to appeal. This has happened quite a few times, where DNA evidence that would exonerate someone exists but isn't allowed to be brought to court

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