(Topic ID: 200735)

should i triple thick the backglass?


By mark532011

1 year ago



Topic Stats

  • 23 posts
  • 14 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by ForceFlow
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

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#1 1 year ago

Got my first EM a little while ago. The backglass looks like mint, I am amazed by it. My question - should I spray triple-thick on it just to preserve it or is that only needed sometimes amd I am just asking for trouble?

#2 1 year ago
Quoted from mark532011:

Got my first EM a little while ago. The backglass looks like mint, I am amazed by it. My question - should I spray triple-thick on it just to preserve it or is that only needed sometimes amd I am just asking for trouble?

Depends. Is this "Krylon" Thriple Thick? Recently we had a post about a bad experience from someone using what he said was Rustolium Thriple Thick. And none of us knew that it existed.

I still have a few cans or the original Krylon from a case I bought 15 years ago. You never know when they will change the recipe.

To the original question, I would say yes. Unless you have this pin in a nice climate controlled area the will never experience temperature or humidity change.

Read up on putting a few business cards on the score window and shooting a few thin coats on the back.

#4 1 year ago
Quoted from Taxman:

Read up on putting a few business cards on the score window and shooting a few thin coats on the back.

once you get good at the rattle spray you can do the triple thick nearly glass clear and not mask the score windows. =D

#5 1 year ago

I only triple thick (well actually Rustoleum Clear)
when absolutely necessary, and after lessons learned,
I only keep a sealed glass in a pretty much climate
controlled area. I have never lost a glass in cold/warm
storage that hadn't been sealed..

#6 1 year ago
Quoted from barakandl:

once you get good at the rattle spray you can do the triple thick nearly glass clear and not mask the score windows. =D

But since he is asking I doubt he's going to be that good. I've done it for decades and can still get a haze. I don't know if it is my spraying, climate, something one the glass because you don't "clean" the back before spraying (unless you have a good method for that I don't know, some times the bubble or lift has begun and you're not going to get harsh) . . .

But I'd rather have it bare than a hazy textured surface. Then you get pissed and pull out the razor blade to scrape the window clean. Then you get real careful to get as close as you can keeping a straight line without nicking any paint . . . .

#7 1 year ago

Chuck from the "Wicked Pissah Pinball Pit" (you may heard about him from the Slam Tilt Podcast or Twitch) says to not do it unless it is starting to flake. I tend to agree as well. I mean if the thing is mint, leave it be. It's like removing mylar from a game only to clearcoat it. It's unnecessary and you really have to weigh the risks with the condition.

#8 1 year ago

But you might buy a brand-new CPR glass because yours got smashed. But the game in a garage or damp basement.

#9 1 year ago
Quoted from Taxman:

But since he is asking I doubt he's going to be that good. I've done it for decades and can still get a haze. I don't know if it is my spraying, climate, something one the glass because you don't "clean" the back before spraying (unless you have a good method for that I don't know, some times the bubble or lift has begun and you're not going to get harsh) . . .
But I'd rather have it bare than a hazy textured surface. Then you get pissed and pull out the razor blade to scrape the window clean. Then you get real careful to get as close as you can keeping a straight line without nicking any paint . . . .

Gets hazy and dusty when the spray too far back. Seems excessive but i get the best results with wet coats.

I screwed up more times trying to mask and not getting it perfect... overspray, masking issues lifting paint etc. Everyone has what works for them!

#10 1 year ago
Quoted from barakandl:

Gets hazy and dusty when the spray too far back. Seems excessive but i get the best results with wet coats.
I screwed up more times trying to mask and not getting it perfect... overspray, masking issues lifting paint etc. Everyone has what works for them!

Agreed, different people and techniques. One time I was doing an Haunted House EM Gun Game backglass and decided blue tape cut to fit the waves was the only way I'd be happy before doing the spray.

#11 1 year ago
Quoted from Taxman:

But I'd rather have it bare than a hazy textured surface.

Yeah, when I have sealed, it's pretty much a must to cover the windows and any other
animated areas. I got good at it, but never was able to leave a picture perfect clearness
in the windows..
In my younger days, I was thinking the same way to preserve a mint glass by sealing
and then had in storage here in N.Y., and dammit, what a mistake..
I highly suggest not to seal a mint glass.
I just read the upper post. Yes, on a flaky glass, masking is a no for me. I covere the
windows with a slightly oversize piece of lath (or whatever) over each window, and weight
it down with something like a lug nut on each. When spraying, sprayed directly above (on top) of
the windows to take away chances of the spray sneaking under the lath. Then within
a half hour or so (while still tacky but not runny), I removed the lath..

#12 1 year ago

For what it's worth, I used to triple thick every glass I owned. Incidentally, at that time, every glass I owned was flaking to some capacity.

That was in 2004. While I have sold a handful of games I triple thicked then, the ones I've kept have not seen any adverse effects from using the sealant, and this includes temperature changes as well. They're all still fine, and look the same as the day I sealed them.

I've heard people run into issues when their first coat is heavy and wet. I've had great luck doing several very light, almost misty coats, until I get the desired level of sealant applied to the glass. Also, I stopped using business cards to mask off the score windows. I had a single glass where the card stuck to the paint, and pulled some up after I removed it. Since then, I spray over the glass windows and scrape the excess off. It's time consuming, but it works.

#13 1 year ago
Quoted from Taxman:

decided blue tape cut to fit the waves was the only way I'd be happy before doing the spray.

Just to note: I wrote the previous post before reading this one..
I use to use tape, but you need to be dead on and still found once the
spray dried, it still could cling to the paint and the tape, so that's
when I went with the lath and always made sure that I removed
the pieces well before the clear had dried..

#14 1 year ago

I have used the Krylon on 4 back glasses, one of them a white knuckle (it was a great example of Fireball Classic) and will probably use it again.
Experience with 1-5 West System epoxy tells me its probably a better way to go, just haven't figured out the proper technique.
The UV resistant hardener would be a must.
The Triple Thick is a great product for an unusual application,I like it and think it helps, even on cracked glasses( with proper prep, of course.

#15 1 year ago

I've never had any problems with Triple Thick. You must only use it during low humidity though. I always clean the back of the glass as needed beforehand, but be sure let it dry thoroughly. Then I cut out small rectangles of card stock, and cover the score reel windows and replay meter window, plus any other clear areas. Love doing woodrail backglasses with light up scoring. They're easy!
Spray a fairly heavy coat in one direction, wait a few minutes and spray a second coat in the other direction. I try to spray it in strong direct sunlight. It dries to the touch in about twenty minutes, but I always wait a few days before installng the glass in the game.
I've done many backglasses that had little or no flaking, to insure that they stay that way. I wouldn't expose a sealed glass to very cold temperatures though.

#17 1 year ago

If it has stayed mint all these years, why would you want to mess with perfection?

#18 1 year ago

Please do not use Triple Thick on a backglass that shows no signs of paint lifting or paint cracking. Keep the backglass out of direct sunlight and it should be fine...

#19 1 year ago

The way I look at this situation is that right now you have a really nice backglass that makes you happy.
If you Triple Thick it you will either still have a really nice backglass or you will have a "...what the heck happened, it was perfectly fine before..." backglass.

Been both places. You can't un-ring this bell so make your decision carefully.

Alan

1 week later
#20 1 year ago

thanks guys, I think I will leave it for now. I just didn't want one of those "why didn't you triple thick back when it wasn't flaking" type of moments years from now

-1
#21 1 year ago

if it's mint, never EVER triple thick. Triple thick is for when a backglass is flaking off badly and you want to salvage what little ink is left. ONce you triple thick there is NO going back and now the glass is forever fragile to extreme temp changes either hot or cold. I've seen glass left in a car in winter for a couple of hours triple thicked and it contracted at a different rate than the ink. Pulled off all the ink off the glass and it basically looked like a window.

#22 1 year ago
Quoted from mark532011:

I think I will leave it

I say very wise move. Why tamper with something that's
been mint for 40 or 50 years..

#23 1 year ago
Quoted from mark532011:

The backglass looks like mint, I am amazed by it. My question - should I spray triple-thick on it just to preserve it or is that only needed sometimes amd I am just asking for trouble?

Yup, if there's nothing wrong with it, leave it be. Just make sure it lives in a space that has a reasonably stable temperature and humidity.

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