(Topic ID: 243960)

Servicing World Cup Soccer

By Hop721

2 years ago


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  • 15 posts
  • 9 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by DBUM
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“Servicing World Cup Soccer”

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#1 2 years ago

Hi guys. I have volunteered to maintain and service a World Cup Soccer machine at my local Children’s Hospital and I’m wondering if anyone has any insight as to specific tools, specific problems or any other specific information for this game.
I have always maintained and serviced my own machines but they have always been new in box and haven’t had many repair issues. I’d love any advice. I want to keep these kids playing!!!

#2 2 years ago

The soccer ball motor assembly is a trouble area. The pinion gear at the motor can get stripped.

#3 2 years ago

Kids will sometimes start a game and then just walk away... the soccer ball keeps spinning until the motor burns out.

Adjust the GI settings to dim after 2 minutes... I think default is 30 minutes. This will keep the header pins from cooking.

#4 2 years ago

You can literally just unplug the soccer ball motor and the gameplay difference is nil. I mean sometimes the soccer ball will throw the pinball up at the goal and that's cool but in general NBD.

Besides that make sure the Goalie mechanism is moving free and clear and do the usual stuff. Sleeves, stops, bulbs, wax, etc.

#5 2 years ago

Taking out the ramps (for the first time) is a bear; its required to change all the bulbs in the pop bumpers, and to change all the rubbers. Be careful with the diverter shaft. Double check every area, as you will undoubtedly have one black rubber on a impossible to reach post after you switch everything to white rubbers and put everything back together, and you'll notice it every time. Ask me how I know, haha.

I would HIGHLY recommend swapping to led's for the above mentioned reason; there are a lot of bulbs in this puppy (like 140ish if I recall from when I did mine), and it has a tendency to get pretty warm with standard incandescents. I swapped and replaced the GI pins in mine about a year ago, and they still look as good as the day I replaced them. Zero yellowing/browning.

#6 2 years ago

Thanks everyone. I should be getting in there to see the pin and make an assessment soon. I’ll definitely look at everything you all mentioned and I’m sure I’ll have more questions! Thanks for all the help.

1 week later
#7 2 years ago

Anyone know a cure for a ball eject mech that isn’t retracting fully after kicking the ball out (the one with the purple cup directly in front and to the left of the goal)?
It kicks out weak and doesn’t return to the down position. Maybe just some lube on moving parts? Stronger spring on the plunger? I’d like to avoid buying and replacing the entire set up.
I jury rigged it with a rubber band so the kids could still play, but not sure how long that’ll last. Thanks!

#8 2 years ago
Quoted from Hop721:

Anyone know a cure for a ball eject mech that isn’t retracting fully after kicking the ball out (the one with the purple cup directly in front and to the left of the goal)?
It kicks out weak and doesn’t return to the down position. Maybe just some lube on moving parts? Stronger spring on the plunger? I’d like to avoid buying and replacing the entire set up.
I jury rigged it with a rubber band so the kids could still play, but not sure how long that’ll last. Thanks!

Take apart, clean it and put back together with a fresh coil sleeve.

#9 2 years ago

Pinball machines generally require very little, if any lubricant. If it's not obvious, no WD-40 anywhere near the game. If the game needs to stay off because of issues, you should leave it off until it gets fixed properly. The last thing you need is for you to volunteer to maintain a machine, have a coil lock on because a shortcut was taken to allow the kids to play it, then have a fire on your hands. Obviously, that is the worst case scenario. It sounds like there's still a lot for you to learn, which is great, but I would advise against taking any shortcuts or "jury-rigging."

Please don't let my post discourage you from continuing, but I saw some red flags in your post and wanted to make sure that you learned the proper steps before proceeding.

#10 2 years ago
Quoted from FatPanda:

Pinball machines generally require very little, if any lubricant. If it's not obvious, no WD-40 anywhere near the game. If the game needs to stay off because of issues, you should leave it off until it gets fixed properly. The last thing you need is for you to volunteer to maintain a machine, have a coil lock on because a shortcut was taken to allow the kids to play it, then have a fire on your hands. Obviously, that is the worst case scenario. It sounds like there's still a lot for you to learn, which is great, but I would advise against taking any shortcuts or "jury-rigging."
Please don't let my post discourage you from continuing, but I saw some red flags in your post and wanted to make sure that you learned the proper steps before proceeding.

Fair enough. I appreciate the honest feedback. A definite learning curve on this older machine, but I’m sure I’ll get there with the help of this community. I’ll keep it off until I can get the parts to fix it properly.

#11 2 years ago
Quoted from Hop721:

Fair enough. I appreciate the honest feedback. A definite learning curve on this older machine, but I’m sure I’ll get there with the help of this community. I’ll keep it off until I can get the parts to fix it properly.

You'll find that old or new, pinball really hasn't changed in the last 40 years. A game that you work on from 1975 will have generally the same mechanical principles to 2019. A flipper mech generally operates the same; a saucer kickout generally operates the same. Most games will benefit from cleaning the mechs and re-sleeving the coils. If you want it "just good enough" for the kids to flip the ball, you might not have to do a full shop job. For me, any game that I work on gets at minimum, a new set of rings, clean/waxed playfield, LEDs, rebuilt pop bumpers and flippers, cleaned and resleeved mechs (basically anything that is a moving part), new drop targets or other plastic parts. Obviously, for a game that you don't own, the amount of money/effort might be different.

You'll find that the cost of a complete shop job could range from $100-$400 or more. Just depends on how well you want to present the game and how well you want it to play.

For your other issue with the saucer kickout, going with chuckwurt advice will likely get that kickout working properly again.

#12 2 years ago
Quoted from FatPanda:

You'll find that old or new, pinball really hasn't changed in the last 40 years. A game that you work on from 1975 will have generally the same mechanical principles to 2019. A flipper mech generally operates the same; a saucer kickout generally operates the same. Most games will benefit from cleaning the mechs and re-sleeving the coils. If you want it "just good enough" for the kids to flip the ball, you might not have to do a full shop job. For me, any game that I work on gets at minimum, a new set of rings, clean/waxed playfield, LEDs, rebuilt pop bumpers and flippers, cleaned and resleeved mechs (basically anything that is a moving part), new drop targets or other plastic parts. Obviously, for a game that you don't own, the amount of money/effort might be different.
You'll find that the cost of a complete shop job could range from $100-$400 or more. Just depends on how well you want to present the game and how well you want it to play.
For your other issue with the saucer kickout, going with chuckwurt advice will likely get that kickout working properly again.

Invaluable Info. Thank you!
I am, unfortunately, limited by how much the owner wants to spend on parts. The small stuff I can get no problem (sleeves and such), And I’m not short on elbow grease. Like you say, just looking at my 2017 game, I’ve found many similarities to this one. It is fun and challenging and rewarding. And, hopefully, passing on the joy of this game to the next generation.

9 months later
#13 2 years ago

Hey guys so I just got this machine and it's my very first machine. Im having two problems with it. The first is the right slingshot switch when tested is also registering another trough switch of some sort. I will upload a picture in the future.

Second problem. The ball gets stuck in the goal trough right before the striker popper coil. But it only happens on a goal that activates a striker award. Maybe dirty opto? Any ideas?

#14 2 years ago

You'll probably have better luck starting a new thread and/or posting to the World Cup Soccer group.

There are some good tutorials and threads about troubleshooting crossed switches here. Do a little digging.

Probably need some more info on the ball in the goal trough. Is the ball not reaching the end of the trough where the kicker sits? That's probably something blocking the trough. I've had bits get stuck down there. If it is just sitting there right on the kicker, that's probably a bad opto. You can unscrew both goal optos relatively easily, and there's a molex connector so you don't have to cut any wires. First just try to clean the optos with a cotton swab, they might just be dirty. Otherwise the optos are pretty cheap at pinball life and a quick job to solder new ones on.

#15 2 years ago

Thanks for the help. They are stripping in the trough right before the kicker. So I'll take a look. I also started a new thread.

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