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(Topic ID: 202912)

Serviceability today vs 40 years ago


By ForceFlow

2 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 9 posts
  • 6 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by LTG
  • No one calls this topic a favorite

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#1 2 years ago

I stumbled upon this ad for Allied Leisure Dynomite from 1976. This was one of the first solid state games ever built. Notice the bullet point about "interchangeable modular components".

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I just found it interesting that nearly the same thing from 41 years ago was being marketed today as a benefit for Stern's Spike system.

For those who haven't seen the inside of an early allied leisure game:

http://www.ipdb.org/machine.cgi?id=750

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#2 2 years ago

Ah the good ol' Days...

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#3 2 years ago

I think even back in the day they were just thinking of tossing a faulty board out and replacing it instead of repairing it.
-Mike

#4 2 years ago

Wasn't modular board design the whole reason William's chose to separate both the driver board and CPU board with that terrible interconnect board--even though they were designed to operate as a unit, and neither could function without the other? Its funny to see how commercial pinball want to subdivide their boards to replaceable units, where the home models wanted to keep everything down to as few boards as possible, as evident behind the backglass with the driver and cpu boards combined into a single unit, and under the playfield with all the switches, lamps, and related wiring soldered onto a giant circuit board.

#5 2 years ago
Quoted from mbaumle:

Wasn't modular board design the whole reason William's chose to separate both the driver board and CPU board with that terrible interconnect board--even though they were designed to operate as a unit, and neither could function without the other? Its funny to see how commercial pinball want to subdivide their boards to replaceable units, where the home models wanted to keep everything down to as few boards as possible, as evident behind the backglass with the driver and cpu boards combined into a single unit, and under the playfield with all the switches, lamps, and related wiring soldered onto a giant circuit board.

To me, it makes sense to divide power supply/regulation, logic, and drivers.

If you have a coil that locks up and cooks the board, just replace the driver board. If you have a regulator fail, just replace the power board. If you have a logic problem, just replace the MPU.

The downside is more connectors and a larger single PCB. I'm not sure if it ends up being more expensive one way or another, or a wash. I know the larger you go with a PCB, the more expensive it is. However, back in the 70s and 80s, some games had some fairly giant-sized PCBs.

#6 2 years ago

Biggest difference I see is that years ago when PCBs started becoming the norm, manufacturers produced and sold many test fixtures (up to the year 2000) so the boards were easily serviceable and repairable. This is what was needed then to get the sales over the line as people were stepping in to the unknown.

I am sincerely hoping that history repeats itself.

#7 2 years ago
Quoted from pinballaddicted:

This is what was needed then to get the sales over the line as people were stepping in to the unknown.

And the distributors saw an untapped market and could make a few bucks doing board repairs.

LTG : )

#8 2 years ago
Quoted from pinballaddicted:

Biggest difference I see is that years ago when PCBs started becoming the norm, manufacturers produced and sold many test fixtures (up to the year 2000) so the boards were easily serviceable and repairable. This is what was needed then to get the sales over the line as people were stepping in to the unknown.
I am sincerely hoping that history repeats itself.

It's kind of interesting how that has tapered off.

But, it seems we live in a throwaway society for the most part these days, unfortunately.

#9 2 years ago
Quoted from ForceFlow:

It's kind of interesting how that has tapered off.

At least for coin op. Less and less distributors every year. So no market to make and sell lots of test fixtures.

LTG : )

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