(Topic ID: 328734)

Rush Node Board 10 issues and Non issues list

By Jamesays

35 days ago


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  • 373 posts
  • 81 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 hours ago by Peak-Pin
  • Topic is favorited by 58 Pinsiders

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“Rush Node Board 10 issues and Non issues list”

  • LE/Premium with issues 38 votes
    32%
  • LE/Premium no issues 79 votes
    68%

(117 votes)

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#201 15 days ago
Quoted from PinballHaven:

Vote with your dollars and learn what to expect from each manufacturer if you buy NIB.

And I do "vote with my dollars" just look at my avatar, Stern made my grail pin & I won't buy it. I wasn't "whining " about it, I just didn't come across the same as you did and I somewhat agree with you: If you buy a Stern, be ready to deal with their BS for the possible long haul.

#202 15 days ago
Quoted from gjm:

And I do "vote with my dollars" just look at my avatar, Stern made my grail pin & I won't buy it. I wasn't "whining " about it, I just didn't come across the same as you did and I somewhat agree with you: If you buy a Stern, be ready to deal with their BS for the possible long haul.

legit discussion is not whining and is welcome here.

#203 15 days ago
Quoted from Jamesays:

legit discussion is not whining and is welcome here.

I agree, tell that to post #196
I may cry in my beer but I never whine

#204 15 days ago
Quoted from mjannusch:

How difficult would it be to add the protection components to the node board? Looks like the whole circuit is just a few varistors and potentially some 470pF caps.

I'm pretty sure they could piggy back a daughter board on there if they wanted, not sure they will as the board works ok on Godzilla, no incentive to do it and possibly maybe no reason ?

#205 15 days ago

Going forward anyway to protect the node board in case of a future motor failure years down the road?

#206 15 days ago

Well, resoldering the ramp motor connector pins appears impossible without the right pin extraction tool, I see now that I have taken a closer look. I had assumed you could finagle them out with a couple jeweler's screwdrivers like you can a regular Molex pin, but they look too tiny and it appears that tabs spring out on three sides when a pin is inserted. So, they are still in the connector and I cannot discern whether any solder is even present. The wires sure aren't loose at least, I tugged on each one rather aggressively, so that's something, I suppose. Still concerned about eventual corrosion however, assuming the solder is there, as that is equivalent to four cold solder joints. I even considered screwing some small screws into the connector next to the crimps to improve the mechanical connection, but I decided not to experiment expecting to get it right the first try.

I chickened out on simply removing the connector and soldering the wires together just yet. It felt like that would be too radical when I had just verified the wires were in there real good. Better to keep everything factory for now.

I will say that the GI lamp socket behind the motor sure looks close to shorting against the motor housing! But there was some insulating tape added between them, and if they did short it would affect the GI board before Node 10, I guess. Still, out of an abundance of caution I disconnected the bulb and I don't even miss it. Coincidentally, one of the wires going to that bulb did have a nasty nick in the insulation to where I could see the wire! Looks like a soldering iron melted it. Another reason to unplug it...

PXL_20230124_041339280~3 (resized).jpg
#207 15 days ago
Quoted from gjm:

I agree, tell that to post #196
I may cry in my beer but I never whine

I wasn’t calling any one person out sorry if it came off that way. Just trying to get people to realize the expectation that stern will make every owner right on any defect isn’t going to happen that’s not how they operate.

Here is my original full statement for context, your question in the middle of the two responses was about consistency.

“This absolutely nails it. People can stop complaining about Stern, it's useless. Protect your investment if you want to, or don't. If it breaks, get in line with them and wait for parts. The Stern machine handles these matters consistently and it's not changing. Reference Rush scoop protectors or AIQ subway issues as reinforcement of this pattern in recent games.

they consistently don't respond or give away parts to people that don't open tickets. They consistently produce service bulletins for issues once they have a viable solution. They consistently keep producing machines with little to no QC and don't apologize. I don't see any inconsistency in their approach.......expecting a different outcome is futile here and whining on pinside doesn't do anything. Vote with your dollars and learn what to expect from each manufacturer if you buy NIB. DYOR!”

#208 14 days ago

You are correct, I totally misread your statement. Time to start reading things twice

#209 14 days ago
Quoted from jonboy71:

Would it be a reasonable request for Stern to update the code to allow the user to cut power to both the drum and the ramp and also allow the ramp to stay up until they can get a solution in place?

Unfortunately the way it is designed will not allow that. The stepper motor must have power to hold the ramp up. It is not like a dc geared motor.

#210 14 days ago

Rush LE owner #556, 894 total plays, 973 lifetime(No node board issues) here. All of this node board/Stern’s lack of solution nonsense has me pretty scared about my machine. I’ve been following the thread and reading the recent diagnosis about the wrong wire sizes into the molex connector stuff(pardon my ignorance- not my area of expertise.) is the best preventative measure at this point to disconnect the ramp and clock motors and do the rubber ball under the ramp thing to prop it up? And if so, how should I disconnect these 2 things properly? Do I disconnect them both at the node board or closer to the ramp motor molex connector? Thx for any advice.

55A89B1B-2016-4724-987C-04122C614D1B (resized).jpeg6559F585-D7ED-4A09-A960-38F8A20087A7 (resized).jpeg
#211 14 days ago
Quoted from BeeGee6533:

Rush LE owner #556, 894 total plays, 973 lifetime(No node board issues) here. All of this node board/Stern’s lack of solution nonsense has me pretty scared about my machine. I’ve been following the thread and reading the recent diagnosis about the wrong wire sizes into the molex connector stuff(pardon my ignorance- not my area of expertise.) is the best preventative measure at this point to disconnect the ramp and clock motors and do the rubber ball under the ramp thing to prop it up? And if so, how should I disconnect these 2 things properly? Do I disconnect them both at the node board or closer to the ramp motor molex connector? Thx for any advice.
[quoted image][quoted image]

You want to disconnect power to the node board not unplug the motors and leave the board connected. You want to power down that entire node.

#212 14 days ago
Quoted from spectrum-1980s:

You want to disconnect power to the node board not unplug the motors and leave the board connected. You want to power down that entire node.

Ok, thx! How is that done? Is there a certain cable(Ethernet type) that disconnects the power to the node board? Thx!

#213 14 days ago
Quoted from BeeGee6533:

Ok, thx! How is that done? Is there a certain cable(Ethernet type) that disconnects the power to the node board? Thx!

Quoted from BeeGee6533:

Ok, thx! How is that done? Is there a certain cable(Ethernet type) that disconnects the power to the node board? Thx!

The 48v input is the connector next to the capacitors. Or unplug them all except the two Ethernet wires. They may have to talk to another node. Not sure.

#214 14 days ago

This has already been said in the other thread but needs to be stated again.

DO NOT UNPLUG THE RAMP MOTOR WHILE YOUR MACHINE IS POWERED UP

Your node 10 will fry.

#215 14 days ago
Quoted from Skeets:

This has already been said in the other thread but needs to be stated again.
DO NOT UNPLUG THE RAMP MOTOR AND POWER UP YOUR MACHINE
Your node 10 will fry.

This is incorrect. You may unplug one or both motors WHILE THE POWER IS OFF. Powering up without the motors connected is not an issue. Just don't go unplugging while the power is on. The bad crimp pins have the same effect, disconnecting the motor while it is powered on.

#216 14 days ago
Quoted from Peak-Pin:

This is incorrect. You may unplug one or both motors WHILE THE POWER IS OFF. Powering up without the motors connected is not an issue. Just don't go unplugging while the power is on. The bad crimp pins have the same effect, disconnecting the motor while it is powered on.

So just to be clear, I can unplug the ramp motor at the node 10 board with the power off? I can then stick a rubber ball under the ramp to keep the ramp up?

#217 14 days ago
Quoted from MooButt:

So just to be clear, I can unplug the ramp motor at the node 10 board with the power off? I can then stick a rubber ball under the ramp to keep the ramp up?

With the power off disconnect the clock and the ramp motor (located at the bottom of the board). Then prop up the ramp with a rubber ball or an old sock or something, then turn the power back on.

#218 14 days ago
Quoted from MooButt:

So just to be clear, I can unplug the ramp motor at the node 10 board with the power off? I can then stick a rubber ball under the ramp to keep the ramp up?

I thought you couldn't power up the machine with it unplugged period, but Peak-Pin just seemed to indicate Node 10 only fries if you unplug it while power is on...I thought I recalled another pinsider smoking his board that way, but maybe I misunderstood exactly what happened.

I'm sure others who have done it can confirm that unplugging while off, then powering up is fine...

#219 14 days ago

it is the power interruption while powered up that is the issue

#220 14 days ago

Will the ramp lights still work?

11
#221 13 days ago

I need to say this because it's going to happen. If you can't do the repair/remedy correctly, with the proper tools, then DON'T DO IT and wait for Stern. I can see it now... someone's going to do some half-assed repair, and their node board is going to fry, and then I'll be blamed for it. A half-assed repair is not going to be any better than Stern's original job on the connector.

Use the correct extraction tool or you will damage the connector pin or the housing.

If you're buying pins and a crimping tool, get extra pins and practice on some scrap wire. Make sure your crimp tool is compatible with the crimp pins.

I'll post some step by step instructions with photos in the next few days.

(I repair pinball machines everyday. The number one problem I fix: previous repairs done incorrectly.)

#222 13 days ago
Quoted from DanQverymuch:

The wires sure aren't loose at least, I tugged on each one rather aggressively, so that's something, I suppose. Still concerned about eventual corrosion however, assuming the solder is there, as that is equivalent to four cold solder joints.

The wires won't be loose. The outer part of the crimp pin is holding the wire with the insulation securely. It's the inner part of the crimp pin that is expecting a larger bare wire. The inner part might be loose in there, but unless it's real bad you won't be able to see it. If it was really bad, it wouldn't have gotten out of the factory without the node blowing.

#223 13 days ago
Quoted from gandamack:

With the power off disconnect the clock and the ramp motor (located at the bottom of the board). Then prop up the ramp with a rubber ball or an old sock or something, then turn the power back on.

Can someone be kind enough to take a picture and point out exactly which 2 connectors are supposed to be unplugged/disconnected from Node 10(while the machine is powered off)?

This seems to be the safest way to play the game and not risk a blown board until Stern has a fix. I’m curious if gameplay will be the same? For instance, qualifying the Subdivisions/Fly By Night/Red Barchetta multi balls requires hits to the lowered ramp dead end shot at first. Will a raised ramp to start still qualify it? Also wondering about ramp lights as mentioned.

#224 13 days ago
Quoted from BeeGee6533:

Can someone be kind enough to take a picture and point out exactly which 2 connectors are supposed to be unplugged/disconnected from Node 10(while the machine is powered off)?
This seems to be the safest way to play the game and not risk a blown board until Stern has a fix. I’m curious if gameplay will be the same? For instance, qualifying the Subdivisions/Fly By Night/Red Barchetta multi balls requires hits to the lowered ramp dead end shot at first. Will a raised ramp to start still qualify it? Also wondering about ramp lights as mentioned.

Left connector is the clock, right connector is the ramp.

Regarding your question about gameplay, I'm not 100% sure. When I was waiting for my replacement Node 10 from Stern, the ramp was in the down position the entire time... but it still registered hits via the opto at the top of the ramp to start modes, multiballs, etc.

I believe if you prop the unpowered ramp in the "up" position using one of the creative ideas pinsiders have come up with (sponge, rubber ball, etc), the game will behave more or less like a Rush Pro.

IMG_7531_notated (resized).jpg

#225 13 days ago
Quoted from XQJ-37:

Left connector is the clock, right connector is the ramp.
Regarding your question about gameplay, I'm not 100% sure. When I was waiting for my replacement Node 10 from Stern, the ramp was in the down position the entire time... but it still registered hits via the opto at the top of the ramp to start modes, multiballs, etc.
I believe if you prop the unpowered ramp in the "up" position using one of the creative ideas pinsiders have come up with (sponge, rubber ball, etc), the game will behave more or less like a Rush Pro.
[quoted image]

Did the ramp lights still work while your game was out of commission?

#226 13 days ago
Quoted from MooButt:

Did the ramp lights still work while your game was out of commission?

Yes, the ramp LEDs and opto switch are driven from different node board(s), so they'll continue to work.

It never occurred to me to prop the ramp in the "up" position, and I can tell you that the game is not very enjoyable with the ramp permanently down. Hard shots come rocketing back SDTM, and half of those hard shots don't trigger the opto before returning at warp speed. Not sure if that's a problem on all Premiums/LEs when the ramp is down, or if I have a flaky opto on mine.

#227 13 days ago
Quoted from XQJ-37:

Hard shots come rocketing back SDTM, and half of those hard shots don't trigger the opto before returning at warp speed. Not sure if that's a problem on all Premiums/LEs when the ramp is down, or if I have a flaky opto on mine.

You are correct.

#228 12 days ago

There is also a setting that might affect gameplay. Perhaps someone can verify if it changes rules/scoring.

The setting is under Adjustments -> Rush -> Lift Ramp Disabled (#76). Check if gameplay differs between No and Yes.

IMG_0407 (resized).jpg
14
#229 12 days ago

Procedure for checking over-tight cable ties (aka zip ties)

  1. Make sure the power to the pinball machine is turned off.
  2. Remove balls or put a rag or foam piece in the shooter lane to keep balls from falling out.
  3. Lift playfield and lean against backbox.
  4. Under the ramp, locate the ramp motor with four wires coming out of it (red, blue, green and black). They have white plastic cable ties around them.
  5. Orange arrows showing cable ties

  6. The white plastic cable ties should be snug, but still able to slide side-to-side along the wire. If you can’t slide the cable tie along the wire, then using some fine tipped cutters, remove it. Be extremely careful not to cut any of the wires. I find it is easier to cut the cable tie right at the point where it changes size from the narrow section that wraps around the wires to the thicker locking section.
  7. Cutting a cable tie

  8. Replace the cable tie with either another cable tie, or a small piece of tape wrapped around the bundle. If using cable ties, install them in a different nearby location along the wire than the original ones.
  9. IMG_0404 (resized).jpg

  10. Locate the Node 10 board. It’s on the left of the playfield, just below center. (Good photo above in post #224)
  11. Follow the wires (red, blue, green, black bundle) to the Drum/Clock from CN1 (lower left connector on Node 10) until they go through a hole in the playfield.
  12. Check the cable ties as in steps 5 and 6 above.
  13. If your cable ties haven't been over-tight so far, you can probably skip the the following steps.

  14. Lower the playfield with the supports resting on the lockbar.
  15. Behind the Drum/Clock near the left edge of the playfield is a narrow triangular piece of clear plastic. It is held into place with two flat-head phillips screws. (green arrows)
  16. IMG_0248 (resized).jpg

  17. Remove the screws. It’s probably easiest with a magnetic screw driver.
  18. Remove the plastic.
  19. The metal base of the Drum/Clock is attached to the playfield with 3 pan-head philips screws. Two are located on the left side of the drum and one is located on the right, under the wire ramp. Remove these 3 screws. (red arrows)
  20. IMG_0247 (resized).jpg
    IMG_0246 (resized).jpg

  21. Carefully lift and rotate the Drum/Clock motor to the right to reveal the wires coming out of the bottom of it.
  22. IMG_0244 (resized).jpg

  23. Locate the bundle of red, green, blue and black wires. They have white plastic cable ties around them. There should be two cable ties visible before the wires disappear under the playfield.
  24. Check the cable ties as in steps 5 and 6 above.
22
#231 12 days ago

Procedure for crimping the correct connector pins onto the ramp motor
Note: this is not required for the Drum/Clock motor since it uses a different connector

Read this post for background on the issue: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7366041

Since this post may be read years from now, there might be a mix of correct and incorrect connector pins being used. Here is a way you can check if the correct pins are attached to the motor. You can do this without taking anything apart or needing any tools.

  1. Make sure the power to the pinball machine is turned off.
  2. Remove the playfield glass.
  3. Remove balls or put a rag or foam piece in the shooter lane to keep balls from falling out.
  4. Lift playfield and lean against backbox.
  5. Under the ramp, locate the ramp motor with four wires coming out of it (red, blue, green and black).
  6. Look into the end of the connector where the motor wires go. In the photo below I have replaced the crimp pin on the green wire and reinserted it into the housing. The green wire has the correct crimp pin (green arrow), the black wire has the incorrect pin (red arrow). The correct pin is wrapped around the insulation. The incorrect pin has curled metal pushing down against the insulation.
  7. IMG_0399 (resized).jpg
    Here is a view with two pins extracted from the housing to give you a better idea of what you’re looking for.
    IMG_0401 (resized).jpg
    If your pins have the curls on the end, then you should get a replacement motor from Stern with the correct pins installed.

    If you want to do it yourself, then here is a procedure.

    Read these posts first for information on parts and tools:

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7366761

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7367768

  8. Unplug the connector by pressing down on the latch and pulling it apart. Look into the pin-side (haha) of the connector, with the locking tab/bump (green arrow) at the top. You will see two slots on either side of the pin (red arrows). This is where the pin extraction tool is inserted.
  9. IMG_0392 (resized).jpg

  10. Insert the tool on one side while gently pushing the corresponding wire towards the extractor on the other side. You might feel a little click once the extractor is all of the way inserted. Now pull the wire and pin easily out of the housing.
  11. IMG_0393 (resized).jpg

  12. Cut the wire off of the pin about an 1/8” (3mm) from the pin.
  13. Strip about 1/8” (3mm) of insulation from the wire.
  14. Insert a new pin into your crimp tool. Usually the non-crimping end is on the right side of it. If the crimp tool is a ratcheting type, squeeze the handle one or two clicks to hold the pin in place. Most crimp tools have multiple slots for pins based on size. You're going to be crimping a 26 gauge (AWG) wire so place the pin in the appropriate slot.
  15. IMG_0394 (resized).jpg

  16. Insert the wire on the opposite side of the crimping tool.
  17. IMG_0400 (resized).jpg
    The most critical part of this operation is how far you insert the wire. Here is a photo of a wire beside a crimp pin. This is how far the wire should be inserted into the crimp. You want the insulation to be grabbed by the outer crimp and the bare wire to be grabbed by the inner crimp.
    IMG_0409 (resized).jpg

  18. Squeeze the crimping tool firmly. If using a ratchet type, it won’t release until you’ve squeezed it all of the way.
  19. Here is a photo of a good crimping job. The insulation is under the lower section and you can see the end of the insulation and the bare wire before going into up into the next section. The end of the wire shouldn’t go beyond the ears on the left and right, or else you won’t be able to get the pin back into the housing. This one is barely past the ear but I was still able to insert it into the housing.
    IMG_0397 (resized).jpg

    Also, this applies if you’re soldering the old pins instead of replacing them. Don’t allow any solder to go beyond the ears and into the “U” channel.

    Here are two bad crimps that I intentionally did on a practice wire. On the upper pin, the wire didn’t get inserted far enough and the insulation is not being held by the pin. Plus, there is not enough wire in the next section to make a good connection. On the lower pin, the wire was inserted too far. The insulation got smashed by the second section where the wire should be bare. The insulation is keeping it from making a good connection.
    IMG_0411 (resized).jpg

    If things don't look good (use a magnifying glass or your phone camera), cut the pin off of the wire and start over.

  20. Once you’ve got a good looking crimp, insert the pin into the housing. The top of the “U” of the faces the locking tab.
  21. It is best to change one pin at a time so the pins don’t get reinserted into the housing in the wrong order. Repeat the above steps for the other 3 wires.
  22. When finished, join the connector back together and make sure that red is going to red, and green is going to green, etc.

Good luck!

#232 12 days ago

Exactly 100 votes so far 34% report 1 or more failures.Small sample but still a high level of failures.

#233 12 days ago

604 Pinsiders have a Rush prem/LE
327 LEs
277 premiums
What % have node 10 problems or bad wiring harness ?Lets find out.

#234 12 days ago
Quoted from Peak-Pin:

Procedure for crimping the correct connector pins onto the ramp motor
Note: this is not required for the Drum/Clock motor since it uses a different connector
Read this post for background on the issue: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7366041
Since this post may be read years from now, there might be a mix of correct and incorrect connector pins being used. Here is a way you can check if the correct pins are attached to the motor. You can do this without taking anything apart or needing any tools.

Make sure the power to the pinball machine is turned off.
Remove the playfield glass.
Remove balls or put a rag or foam piece in the shooter lane to keep balls from falling out.
Lift playfield and lean against backbox.
Under the ramp, locate the ramp motor with four wires coming out of it (red, blue, green and black).
Look into the end of the connector where the motor wires go. In the photo below I have replaced the crimp pin on the green wire and reinserted it into the housing. The green wire has the correct crimp pin (green arrow), the black wire has the incorrect pin (red arrow). The correct pin is wrapped around the insulation. The incorrect pin has curled metal pushing down against the insulation.
[quoted image]
Here is a view with two pins extracted from the housing to give you a better idea of what you’re looking for.
[quoted image]
If your pins have the curls on the end, then you should get a replacement motor from Stern with the correct pins installed.
If you want to do it yourself, then here is a procedure.
Read these posts first for information on parts and tools:
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7366761
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7367768
Unplug the connector by pressing down on the latch and pulling it apart. Look into the pin-side (haha) of the connector, with the locking tab/bump (green arrow) at the top. You will see two slots on either side of the pin (red arrows). This is where the pin extraction tool is inserted.
[quoted image]
Insert the tool on one side while gently pushing the corresponding wire towards the extractor on the other side. You might feel a little click once the extractor is all of the way inserted. Now pull the wire and pin easily out of the housing.
[quoted image]
Cut the wire off of the pin about an 1/8” (3mm) from the pin.
Strip about 1/8” (3mm) of insulation from the wire.
Insert a new pin into your crimp tool. Usually the non-crimping end is on the right side of it. If the crimp tool is a ratcheting type, squeeze the handle one or two clicks to hold the pin in place.
[quoted image]
Insert the wire on the opposite side of the crimping tool.
[quoted image]
The most critical part of this operation is how far you insert the wire. Here is a photo of a wire beside a crimp pin. This is how far the wire should be inserted into the crimp. You want the insulation to be grabbed by the outer crimp and the bare wire to be grabbed by the inner crimp.
[quoted image]
Squeeze the crimping tool firmly. If using a ratchet type, it won’t release until you’ve squeezed it all of the way.
Here is a photo of a good crimping job. The insulation is under the lower section and you can see the end of the insulation and the bare wire before going into up into the next section. The end of the wire shouldn’t go beyond the ears on the left and right, or else you won’t be able to get the pin back into the housing. This one is barely past the ear but I was still able to insert it into the housing.
[quoted image]
Also, this applies if you’re soldering the old pins instead of replacing them. Don’t allow any solder to go beyond the ears and into the “U” channel.
Here are two bad crimps that I intentionally did on a practice wire. On the upper pin, the wire didn’t get inserted far enough and the insulation is not being held by the pin. Plus, there is not enough wire in the next section to make a good connection. On the lower pin, the wire was inserted too far. The insulation got smashed by the second section where the wire should be bare. The insulation is keeping it from making a good connection.
[quoted image]
If things don't look good (use a magnifying glass or your phone camera), cut the pin off of the wire and start over.
Once you’ve got a good looking crimp, insert the pin into the housing. The top of the “U” of the faces the locking tab.
It is best to change one pin at a time so the pins don’t get reinserted into the housing in the wrong order. Repeat the above steps for the other 3 wires.
When finished, join the connector back together and make sure that red is going to red, and green is going to green, etc.

Good luck!

Killer tutorial, thanks for the effort!! can you post a better pic of extraction tool?!

#235 12 days ago

Nvm

#236 12 days ago
Quoted from Peak-Pin:

Procedure for crimping the correct connector pins onto the ramp motor

Wow, pinsider of the year goes to you! Thanks for taking time out of your day to share your knowledge. Sincerely... really appreciate that you are so helpful. Again, thank you.

#237 12 days ago

Wow that was a really nice tutorial. Thanks for doing this. Do you live in North Jersey perhaps? I have beer.

#238 12 days ago
Quoted from Peak-Pin:

Procedure for crimping the correct connector pins onto the ramp motor
Note: this is not required for the Drum/Clock motor since it uses a different connector
Read this post for background on the issue: https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7366041
Since this post may be read years from now, there might be a mix of correct and incorrect connector pins being used. Here is a way you can check if the correct pins are attached to the motor. You can do this without taking anything apart or needing any tools.

Make sure the power to the pinball machine is turned off.
Remove the playfield glass.
Remove balls or put a rag or foam piece in the shooter lane to keep balls from falling out.
Lift playfield and lean against backbox.
Under the ramp, locate the ramp motor with four wires coming out of it (red, blue, green and black).
Look into the end of the connector where the motor wires go. In the photo below I have replaced the crimp pin on the green wire and reinserted it into the housing. The green wire has the correct crimp pin (green arrow), the black wire has the incorrect pin (red arrow). The correct pin is wrapped around the insulation. The incorrect pin has curled metal pushing down against the insulation.
[quoted image]
Here is a view with two pins extracted from the housing to give you a better idea of what you’re looking for.
[quoted image]
If your pins have the curls on the end, then you should get a replacement motor from Stern with the correct pins installed.
If you want to do it yourself, then here is a procedure.
Read these posts first for information on parts and tools:
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7366761
https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/rush-node-board-10-issues-and-non-issues-list/page/4#post-7367768
Unplug the connector by pressing down on the latch and pulling it apart. Look into the pin-side (haha) of the connector, with the locking tab/bump (green arrow) at the top. You will see two slots on either side of the pin (red arrows). This is where the pin extraction tool is inserted.
[quoted image]
Insert the tool on one side while gently pushing the corresponding wire towards the extractor on the other side. You might feel a little click once the extractor is all of the way inserted. Now pull the wire and pin easily out of the housing.
[quoted image]
Cut the wire off of the pin about an 1/8” (3mm) from the pin.
Strip about 1/8” (3mm) of insulation from the wire.
Insert a new pin into your crimp tool. Usually the non-crimping end is on the right side of it. If the crimp tool is a ratcheting type, squeeze the handle one or two clicks to hold the pin in place.
[quoted image]
Insert the wire on the opposite side of the crimping tool.
[quoted image]
The most critical part of this operation is how far you insert the wire. Here is a photo of a wire beside a crimp pin. This is how far the wire should be inserted into the crimp. You want the insulation to be grabbed by the outer crimp and the bare wire to be grabbed by the inner crimp.
[quoted image]
Squeeze the crimping tool firmly. If using a ratchet type, it won’t release until you’ve squeezed it all of the way.
Here is a photo of a good crimping job. The insulation is under the lower section and you can see the end of the insulation and the bare wire before going into up into the next section. The end of the wire shouldn’t go beyond the ears on the left and right, or else you won’t be able to get the pin back into the housing. This one is barely past the ear but I was still able to insert it into the housing.
[quoted image]
Also, this applies if you’re soldering the old pins instead of replacing them. Don’t allow any solder to go beyond the ears and into the “U” channel.
Here are two bad crimps that I intentionally did on a practice wire. On the upper pin, the wire didn’t get inserted far enough and the insulation is not being held by the pin. Plus, there is not enough wire in the next section to make a good connection. On the lower pin, the wire was inserted too far. The insulation got smashed by the second section where the wire should be bare. The insulation is keeping it from making a good connection.
[quoted image]
If things don't look good (use a magnifying glass or your phone camera), cut the pin off of the wire and start over.
Once you’ve got a good looking crimp, insert the pin into the housing. The top of the “U” of the faces the locking tab.
It is best to change one pin at a time so the pins don’t get reinserted into the housing in the wrong order. Repeat the above steps for the other 3 wires.
When finished, join the connector back together and make sure that red is going to red, and green is going to green, etc.

Good luck!

Thank You for the excellent information

#239 12 days ago
Quoted from insight75:

Wow that was a really nice tutorial. Thanks for doing this. Do you live in North Jersey perhaps? I have beer.

Hell, I have whiskey

#240 12 days ago
Quoted from Adaminski:

My guess is that you all are way past just collecting data, based on reading the root cause analysis late in this thread. But here is my info anyhow.
Rush Premium
Date game manufactured: 2022-04-26
Date game received NIB: 2022-06-30
Date node 10 board died: 2022-10-23 (# plays unknown)
Date replacement node 10 board received: ~2022-12-28
Date replaced node 10 board: 2022-12-30
***knocks on wood - working fine so far, as of 2023-01-23

In late December, before sending the node 10 board, Stern asked that I take a bunch of pictures of the wiring between the node 10 board and the motor with zip ties removed, and also the connector between node 10 and the motor, showing clean wire insertion. This was to ensure that the new node 10 wouldn't die upon install. Sent those on 2022-12-21.

Unfortunately, I get to update my post.

Rush Premium
Date game manufactured: 2022-04-26
Date game received NIB: 2022-06-30
Date node 10 board died: 2022-10-23 (# plays unknown)
Date replacement node 10 board received: ~2022-12-28
Date replaced node 10 board: 2022-12-30

Date 2nd node 10 board died: 2023-01-27
Balls played: 2305
Total plays:1019 (yes, I restart)
Average ball time: 1:54

Board died while playing.
Sigh. Ugh. Grumble. Shazbot.

#241 11 days ago
Quoted from Enchantress:

Killer tutorial, thanks for the effort!! can you post a better pic of extraction tool?!

Looks like I left my extraction tool in my friend's Rush machine. But there is a picture of it here: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/molex/0011030044/210947?s=N4IgTCBcDaIIxwLQAYDMLkBZMgLoF8g

#242 11 days ago
Quoted from Peak-Pin:

Looks like I left my extraction tool in my friend's Rush machine. But there is a picture of it here: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/molex/0011030044/210947?s=N4IgTCBcDaIIxwLQAYDMLkBZMgLoF8g

Hopefully you will have it back by February 10th! Excellent recap of the issue and fix.

#243 11 days ago

I went the hard wired route. Super easy and extremely effective. I can put a connector back in if I want to. Probably not.

05A346EE-064B-4BA7-A7C6-8207CC3E7B15 (resized).jpeg
#244 11 days ago
Quoted from JeffHecht:

I went the hard wired route. Super easy and extremely effective. I can put a connector back in if I want to. Probably not.[quoted image]

Whats the procedure ? twist together,solder and shrink wrap.

#245 11 days ago
Quoted from Jamesays:

Whats the procedure ? twist together,solder and shrink wrap.

Clip
Strip
Add heat shrink
Twist
Solder
Position heat shrink
Shrink

If I had one of these games with this suspected problem, I would 100% do this.

Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
Http://chrishiblerpinball.com/contact
Thank you for checking out the PinWiki - http://www.PinWiki.com/

#246 11 days ago
Quoted from JeffHecht:

I went the hard wired route. Super easy and extremely effective. I can put a connector back in if I want to. Probably not.[quoted image]

I did the same, not worth the risk to keep this connector.

#247 10 days ago

I just cut the connector out, stripped the wires, twisted together, soldered and shrink tubed to cover. That connector is 100% not needed and seems like a problem issue. The wires off the motor side are so thin, it's no wonder why they probably didn't get crimped very well.

#248 10 days ago
Quoted from schudel5:

I just cut the connector out, stripped the wires, twisted together, soldered and shrink tubed to cover. That connector is 100% not needed and seems like a problem issue. The wires off the motor side are so thin, it's no wonder why they probably didn't get crimped very well.

So the clock is in need of nothing ? Thanks all

#249 10 days ago
Quoted from Jamesays:

So the clock is in need of nothing ? Thanks all

Nope. Just the connector going to the ramp.

#250 10 days ago
Quoted from schudel5:

The wires off the motor side are so thin, it's no wonder why they probably didn't get crimped very well.

I just answered a PM and thought I would clarify the wire size. The question was that the wires on both sides of the connector looked like the same size. The wire size is based on the bare metal conductor and not the overall size including insulation. Under the insulation the motor wires are smaller than the wires running to the node board. It becomes apparent when the wires are stripped.

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