(Topic ID: 281199)

Rise in prices and inspections?

By Chet_Hardbody

11 months ago


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  • 28 posts
  • 22 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 11 months ago by ReadyPO
  • Topic is favorited by 1 Pinsider

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    #1 11 months ago

    Hear me out.

    I buy a used car for $10,000. Before I pay for it, I take it to my mechanic and have them do an independent inspection.

    I buy a Pinball machine for $10,000. Before I pay for it, I play it and give it a look over, but I'm not an expert.

    Therefore, when buying an expensive Pinball machine, you should bring your own independent inspector to sign off on your purchase.

    This idea is copyrighted © - Chet Hardbody LTD.

    #2 11 months ago

    This is certaintly not a bad idea. Unfortunately there are precious few folks out there that have the skills and marketing savvy to make this a reality. Just trying to find a qualified tech to work on a machine in ones home without having to haul it out is a major challenge. With the advent of this avocation for the folks who have a few bucks in their pockets it would be a great opportunity for a number of folks to start offering in home pinball repair. Charge as needed to make a reasonable profit.

    #3 11 months ago
    Quoted from Chet_Hardbody:

    Therefore, when buying an expensive Pinball machine, you should bring your own independent inspector to sign off on your purchase.

    Really? What could he tell me that I couldn't see by looking it over myself? You are saying "you should", so please be more specific why I should.

    Quoted from Chet_Hardbody:

    I buy a used car for $10,000. Before I pay for it, I take it to my mechanic and have them do an independent inspection.

    Good choice for somebody that doesn't know squat about cars, but again, myself being a qualified mechanic see no purpose in wasting any more money on anything like that.

    #4 11 months ago
    Quoted from Chet_Hardbody:

    Therefore, when buying an expensive Pinball machine, you should bring your own independent inspector to sign off on your purchase.
    This idea is copyrighted © - Chet Hardbody LTD.

    So how much are you willing to pay an 'independent inspector' for their time?

    #5 11 months ago
    Quoted from SunnRAT:

    So how much are you willing to pay an 'independent inspector' for their time?

    Exactly, and how many different games is he going to have to "inspect" for and at what cost each time before he finds the ONE that you should buy and thats IF it's in your budget and location.....

    John

    11
    #6 11 months ago

    Wow carguments...how fresh

    #7 11 months ago
    Quoted from TheLaw:

    Wow carguments...how fresh

    Bout as fresh as your butt playboy

    #8 11 months ago

    Will there be tire kicking on inspection?

    #9 11 months ago
    Quoted from o-din:

    Really? What could he tell me that I couldn't see by looking it over myself? You are saying "you should", so please be more specific why I should.

    Good choice for somebody that doesn't know squat about cars, but again, myself being a qualified mechanic see no purpose in wasting any more money on anything like that.

    damn bro u smart as hell

    14
    #10 11 months ago
    Quoted from Chet_Hardbody:

    when buying an expensive Pinball machine, you should bring your own independent inspector to sign off on your purchase.

    I'm a certified independent pinball inspector.

    Next time you want to purchase a pin, let me know, and I will "sign off on your purchase." I only charge $500.00 per inspection (exclusive of all travel related expenses). If you compare that price to any other certified independent pinball inspectors, I think you will find it to be very competitive.

    Let me know.

    #11 11 months ago

    I'll do it for $499

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    #12 11 months ago
    Quoted from Chet_Hardbody:

    damn bro u smart as hell

    Apparently, around here, someone has to be.

    #13 11 months ago
    Quoted from SunnRAT:

    So how much are you willing to pay an 'independent inspector' for their time?

    Exactly. It sounds like it could be a good idea in theory, but there's a reason why it hasn't been done before in a widespread fashion. When you actually get into the nuts & bolts of doing it in a practical way, the costs involved probably wouldn't be negledgable.

    First, you've got travel time. Then also the time it takes to go through the game and document everything for the potential buyer. Then the scheduling with the seller and if a seller is actually willing to bother to go through this process.

    In the end, it's probably not practical to sell as a service.

    #14 11 months ago

    Go with your "Gut feeling"
    Or pray beforehand for a blessing.
    Or trust the person selling it.
    Or go hide in a room and do nothing

    #15 11 months ago

    What happens after you bought your “certified” inspected pin and you have issues when you bring it home? Do you get a refund from the inspector? Do we start a inspector beware flame thread about how the inspector took you for your money and how he won’t refund you?

    Maybe you should stick with NIB pins or spend the big money with a pin from Chris Hutch at high end pins. That’s probably the closest thing you can get to a certified inspected pin.

    #16 11 months ago

    With nib playfield issues recently I think you have a better chance at a nice game buying used.

    #17 11 months ago
    Quoted from Chet_Hardbody:

    Hear me out.
    I buy a used car for $10,000. Before I pay for it, I take it to my mechanic and have them do an independent inspection.
    I buy a Pinball machine for $10,000. Before I pay for it, I play it and give it a look over, but I'm not an expert.
    Therefore, when buying an expensive Pinball machine, you should bring your own independent inspector to sign off on your purchase.
    This idea is copyrighted © - Chet Hardbody LTD.

    I’ve done this before. It’s a good idea if you’re considering buying a game you aren’t familiar with its era.

    #18 11 months ago

    I think everyone in this thread is thinking way too much into this. Just bring a friend that knows way more than you about the game you’re considering. Get their advice and make your decision.

    #19 11 months ago

    Maybe, he's talking about new, and the problems we are seeing

    #20 11 months ago
    Quoted from Hayfarmer:

    Maybe, he's talking about new, and the problems we are seeing

    Even so. Know some distros have allowed a NIB to be opened at their shop first and inspected before the person takes it home. Not sure which one allowed that though.

    #21 11 months ago

    " You should " likely train up your skill set . Level expected cosmetics is bar set by the buyer . Unless your vision poor you can look in detail as well as anyone .Raised playfield inserts easy to feel by hand . Bad rubber , coil sleeves and
    flipper links something you should replace yourself . Damaged boards battery leak easy visual . As far a things being functional new or old pin(imgoingtobreakworsttime)ball is proper spelling . So time spent on repairs just part of the hobby . You also likely spending big premium for your purchase . Seller NIB not likely to pull games out box for inspection and offer good deal . Hassle to rebox . Seller used good deal will sell to another buyer and avoid the hassle . " Professional " inspection fee + list price + slow to get to perspective machine sounds like great way not to need room for your next purchase !

    Option if above something not worth your time ( just want play fully functional game ) buy from local professional ( Betson if in mid atlantic as example ) with actual field service tech .

    Just my view , but please enjoy your new purchase Shane

    #22 11 months ago

    I tried this once but somehow this idea was "copyrighted".

    #23 11 months ago
    Quoted from chuckwurt:

    Even so. Know some distros have allowed a NIB to be opened at their shop first and inspected before the person takes it home. Not sure which one allowed that though.

    Prob a good idea to look at fields. Rest of problems just mechanical is easy, but I'd pass on a game with playfield issues

    #24 11 months ago
    Quoted from Hayfarmer:

    Maybe, he's talking about new, and the problems we are seeing

    But apparently right off the bat the games look perfectly fine. It’s only after games being played for a while the issues start to develop. For instance the playfield bubbling/pooling issues...

    #25 11 months ago
    Quoted from timtim:

    I tried this once but somehow this idea was "copyrighted".

    Yeah apparently you can Copyright ideas now!

    #26 11 months ago

    If you don’t know how to spend your money, sit on it.

    #27 11 months ago

    A few practical words of advice if you are not confident in your own pinball evaluation skills:

    1 - Learn everything you can about the game before you go - features of the game, common issues to look for, etc.
    2 - When you arrive, if the pin is already on have them show you how to turn it off and on (even if you know how). This will show any boot up issues the pin may have.
    3 - Play a couple of games. Not just a ball, but a full game.
    4 - Go into service modes and check for any errors that may be displayed, then address appropriately

    I'm by no means an expert, but I have purchased 3 used games since I got into the hobby 4-5 years ago. I wouldn't say I was burned on my first game, even though I knew nothing I did ask people what I should look for, but I probably didn't negotiate as well as I could given some of the issues it had. Regardless, it was my first pin, I'd been looking for months for one, and I was willing to overlook a few things. However, I was quite diligent on my other two purchases, and there wasn't an issue at all with either seller. If there is nothing to hide, the seller will be more than happy to spend time with you going over everything. However, usually you will need to ask.

    #28 11 months ago

    I have learned a lot from my first pin purchase to now, I think that is part of the hobby or any hobby for that matter. So yes, I have certainly "overpaid" at the time of purchase on more than one pin due to hidden issues, condition, etc.. However, even when I first started, I educated myself enough to be able to understand basic value. I bought a book (Pinball Machine Care and Maintenance), read Pinwiki and of course, a ton of pinside

    I should also say I don't feel bad about any of my purchases. First, Rising pin values can mask a multitude of sins, I could "cash out" at any time and make money. Second, I have had some killer deals, so Karma at work there. Third, a lot of the value of the pin is in the title - you have to understand market forces as much if not more so as condition. Finally, I do not view Pins as an investment, its a hobby. "Losing" a couple of hundred dollars when most hobbies are just a money pit anyway, for the joy and satisfaction it brings, is the cost of doing business.

    So my advice is educate yourself, don't buy a $10K pin if you are not sure, start with something less expensive or go NIB with a warranty (at least you will know what your depreciation could be).

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