(Topic ID: 80160)

Revenge From Mars (Your Advice Appreciated)


By wongojack

5 years ago



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  • 59 posts
  • 24 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 years ago by Giulio
  • Topic is favorited by 4 Pinsiders

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RFMHole.jpg
rfm autofire.jpg
RFM-HVenabled.JPG
RFM-HVdisabled.JPG
RFM_Computer.jpg
photo.JPG
RFM protector.JPG
Fire.jpg
RFMMartian.png
WP_20140406_010.jpg
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WP_20140406_011.jpg
DropSwitchConnex.jpg
DropAssmb.jpg
RFMSaucerRepair.jpg
RFMPCBSide.jpg

There are 59 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
#1 5 years ago

My second thread on pinside - first was to intro the fact that I just bought my first table and it is an RFM.

Spending my first weekend with it, and I'm getting the hang of inspecting it. Read the f'ing manual and ran the game's excellent diagnostics. There are a handful of lights out and switches that won't fire. I think those should be easy, but there are a few things that are a little more serious.

The Drop Target is disabled. The switch that is part of the assembly is missing along with the connector wires and socket.

The Light and dome on top of the popper are both missing. I'm not sure what bulb goes in there as I can't seem to figure it out from the manual, but I think I found the dome.

I think someone started harvesting parts from this machine as the components went bad. I suspect the opto trans or receiver is out on the popper and one of the coils is out on the drop. I guess I'll learn something new there as I investigate what is wrong with those.

Light column 4b is out. This is a light string on the biggest lamp pcb plate. I get continuity between all the individual lights, but not back to the razor clip where this line is supposed to be connected to the rest of the machine. It's like the clip for this line has somehow been disconnected from the line in the PCB - weird. Nothing really looks scorched or damaged on the board. It could be a defect of some kind in the PCB. I think I might need to resort to connecting a wire from the last light in the string to the razor clamp or post.

So how do you guys work on these? Replacing lights and switches with the playfield vertical might be easy but soldering a wire to a PCB is going to test my ability (and patience) if I don't have a flat surface. I guess I'll have to disconnect the playfield completely, pull it out and lay it on its side?

#2 5 years ago

Well I connected a wire to try and fix column 4b. The connection was a success but the column is still out. I guess there is another problem somewhere.

#3 5 years ago

I really want one of these someday. Only thing that scares me is the computer or monitor going out on it. Does yours have either of these issues? When I do get one, I will probably overpay for a nice one just because of this. But that's still no guarantee that something wont happen.

#4 5 years ago

Well, I know computers and not pinball so that part actually scares me the least. This machine has some problems but the monitor seems fine - ish. You can get an amp for it that I'm going to look into.

I've been looking for this machine basically for 3 years and it came up in my area.

My only problem is this is my first machine and it's gonna take me some time to get up to speed with it. Any help is appreciated.

#5 5 years ago

I picked one up last year around Dec.
You got one at a not "good " but great price.
I installed the video Amplifier you mentioned and it was one of the best things I have done to this one.Really brightened up display with original monitor.Don't forget to update software!
Any work you need to do on play field I would remove it.
This play field is super easy to remove

#6 5 years ago

You picked quite a game to start working on. Sounds like you have a great start. I'm not looking at the manual at the moment but to your question regarding how to work on the playfield, can you get the pcb in a good position to solder by pulling out the playfield and, either laying it out on a table next to the cab or up on its end in front of the machine? If your table/work bench is close enough I don't think you'll have to disconnect the wiring harness. It's pretty long.

#7 5 years ago

4B (and other strings/columns that use big PCBs like that) often suffer from cold solder joints. Remove PCB and inspect the solder on the header pins. Reflow solder as necessary. The IDC connector could also be bad. That's easy enough to replace with a new molex connector so there should really be no reason to solder a wire to the PCB.

The switch for the drop target assembly is an easy to find microswitch with a simple lever. You basically want it to activate the switch when the DT drops.

#8 5 years ago
Quoted from MrArt2u:

4B (and other strings/columns that use big PCBs like that) often suffer from cold solder joints. Remove PCB and inspect the solder on the header pins. Reflow solder as necessary. The IDC connector could also be bad. That's easy enough to replace with a new molex connector so there should really be no reason to solder a wire to the PCB.
The switch for the drop target assembly is an easy to find microswitch with a simple lever. You basically want it to activate the switch when the DT drops.

The header pins . . . It's a razor clamp connector and the pins are forced through the board. They stick out a decent amount on the underside of the board, so I guess I could try to flow solder around the problematic pin, but I think there would be a good chance that I'd flow too much and solder the next pin too . . . maybe not. That would certainly be easy and involve only one solder point.

To replace the connector, I guess I'd need to cut the pins off as pulling it back through would tear up the board. How would you go about removing a connector like that?

I've ordered the microswitch and it was easy to find. It's the connector that is making me scratch my head. The original has two wires coming off with a plastic connector. I'm just really bad at finding stuff like that on digikey. I'll try to post a pic and someone can tell me what the connector is actually called.

1 month later
#9 5 years ago

Ok, I want to replace the ramp. I have a new ramp, but I don't know how to safely remove it and how to replace it so that the fasteners aren't raised and interfere with play. It is fastened in place with fastening pins like this (not actually the ramp):

RFMGrommet.jpg

Here's the actual ramp from the top:

RFMRamp.jpg

#10 5 years ago

It's attached with rivets - you can buy a tool-less rivet kit like [http://www.pinbits.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=72] which works, but it was a bit hit-or-miss when I did it. I finally got a good, lasting pair of rivets in there, but I'd never done it before and it took several tries...

Just remove the bolts attaching the ramp assembly to the solenoid assembly that holds it and remove it from the top of the playfield. Drill or use a punch to hammer out the existing rivets and replace the ramp with the new one. Not too bad, though as I mentioned it took me a few tries to rivet it properly.

#11 5 years ago

If you are going to replace headers on a board I would HIGHLY recommend buying a Hakko 880 Desolder gun. There is a group buy on Pinside and they are under $200, this makes desoldering the pins super easy. Make sure you buy a few different size tips (I believe a 1.5 mm is what is required for header pins) Do not clip the pins, just desolder them and they will come out easy...if you have to tug you can ruin the board. There is no need to ever solder any wires directly to the boards (we call that a hack). If you have specific board issues you could always send the driver board to Boryguard (he is a member here) or Clive at coinop cauldron. Reflowing solder is pretty straightforward, you dont really need to add much solder just heat up what is there.

Good luck with the game, its one of my favorites.

#12 5 years ago

I have a RFM, I bought it 5 years ago from the orginal first owner. HMO!!!! its a beauty and have had no problems as of yet!

#13 5 years ago

lol...........HUO.........home use only!!!

#14 5 years ago

If you have header pin issues, don't screw around replace all of them on the board and replace the connectors with Trifurcon pins. This is the only way it'll be reliable.

To replace the header pins, put a hemostat on one of the pins and heat the solder, then pull the pin out. Go down and do them all. Clean the holes and remove all of the solder with a solderpult or a Hakko 808 if you can afford one. If you're careful you can use desoldering braid as well (but that can lift the pads). Put a new header in and solder all of the points.

The connector will require a good crimping tool but be sure to use Trifurcon pins because they make contact on 3 sides as opposed to one.

http://greatplainselectronics.com/ is a great place to get this stuff.

#15 5 years ago

Good advice guys. I haven't done anything about the connection to the header pin yet. The wire I connected was just a test and it stumped me because it restored connectivity but did not result in the lights on that column working. My "hack" was just held in place with a clip and not soldered.

To make sure we are talking about the same thing, I'll take a picture when I get back to working on that part. I'm willing to buy SOME tools, but I'm not going to crazy. Most of the electronics work I do is for classic gaming and not pinball.

As I've been cleaning the thing off, I've noticed a lot of little hacky repairs. It'll probably take me years to undo all of them if I ever even get there.

#16 5 years ago
Quoted from ignusfast:

It's attached with rivets - you can buy a tool-less rivet kit like [http://www.pinbits.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=72] which works, but it was a bit hit-or-miss when I did it. I finally got a good, lasting pair of rivets in there, but I'd never done it before and it took several tries...
Just remove the bolts attaching the ramp assembly to the solenoid assembly that holds it and remove it from the top of the playfield. Drill or use a punch to hammer out the existing rivets and replace the ramp with the new one. Not too bad, though as I mentioned it took me a few tries to rivet it properly.

I ordered the rivet kit you recommended. Kinda fun to learn how to use a new tool. Thanks for the tip!

1 week later
#17 5 years ago

Ok, I've really cleaned it A LOT and now waxed it.

WP_20140405_002.jpg

Here's what I did to get at the underside.

WP_20140405_004.jpgWP_20140405_005.jpg

The foam elevates so the playfield elements still attached don't get damaged. it also gives a little so what it is touching doesn't get smooshed. I can now get at the switches that are out and maybe some of those that have been replaced with the "wrong" switch.

Here's the main pcb with the wire I paper clipped connecting 4b to it's post.

WP_20140405_007.jpg

#18 5 years ago

Wow- What a hacky mess- you'll get through it tho- and when all else fails play Atari (FireTiger here) .

#19 5 years ago

Lol that's funny I have the same card table set up right now with RFM parts on it. I think it's from the 70's.

#20 5 years ago

Were do you get the amp for the monitor ?

#21 5 years ago
Quoted from JCJP:

Were do you get the amp for the monitor ?

It's an Ultimarc amp. I found a link to it on these boards somewhere:

http://www.ultimarc.com/vidamp.html

#22 5 years ago

Since the game boots, I'd say you got a good deal! Sounds like it's got some issues, but it boots and plays, so I think you'll be fine. Luckily, diagnostics on that game are very in-depth, moreso than basically any other pin.

#23 5 years ago
Quoted from MrArt2u:

4B (and other strings/columns that use big PCBs like that) often suffer from cold solder joints. Remove PCB and inspect the solder on the header pins. Reflow solder as necessary. The IDC connector could also be bad. That's easy enough to replace with a new molex connector so there should really be no reason to solder a wire to the PCB.
The switch for the drop target assembly is an easy to find microswitch with a simple lever. You basically want it to activate the switch when the DT drops.

Quoted from jamieflowers:

Do not clip the pins, just desolder them and they will come out easy...if you have to tug you can ruin the board. There is no need to ever solder any wires directly to the boards (we call that a hack). If you have specific board issues you could always send the driver board to Boryguard (he is a member here) or Clive at coinop cauldron. Reflowing solder is pretty straightforward, you dont really need to add much solder just heat up what is there.

Quoted from awarner:

If you have header pin issues, don't screw around replace all of them on the board and replace the connectors with Trifurcon pins. This is the only way it'll be reliable.
To replace the header pins, put a hemostat on one of the pins and heat the solder, then pull the pin out. Go down and do them all. Clean the holes and remove all of the solder with a solderpult or a Hakko 808 if you can afford one. The connector will require a good crimping tool but be sure to use Trifurcon pins because they make contact on 3 sides as opposed to one.

Here are more pictures of the PCB. I don't see any solder anywhere that I could remove. This connector appears to have been pushed through the board and not soldered on. This is why I was confused at the recommendation to flow solder in there. In where? There is no solder joint. I don't know how this type of connector is installed, but I really don't think a soldering iron is involved - at least not one operated by a human being. This is why my first thought was to connect a wire.

RFMPCBUnder.jpgRFMPCBSide.jpg

Why would someone have cut the wires to the connectors to both saucer lamp sockets?

RFMSaucerRepair.jpg

Were they just being careless? Seems unlikely that both would be cut on accident. Did they replace the sockets with something non-standard? As you can see, their repair failed on one of the saucers and they left me millimeters of wire to try and re-connect. When I removed the ramp, I had to disconnect a butt connector that had the wires crimped together. They made another cut on the corresponding connector from the wire harness to hack it together.

Regarding the drop target switch. Here's what it looks like right now

DropAssmb.jpg

The target will move up and down and lock into place. It's possible the only thing wrong is the switch is missing. In order to connect the switch I need a wired connector like this one. It's opening is 3/4". What are these called?

DropSwitchConnex.jpg

Finally, they've disconnected the EOS switches on purpose. I don't really understand what the EOS switches are, but in this case, I think they just removed the common wire as there is a "loose" wire that is black with a blue stripe. I thought I'd just connect it to the common point, but before I do that, I wanted to ask someone who has RFM to check the EOS switch wiring and tell me what the wire colors are.

#24 5 years ago

In your first picture of the back of the header pins, just pull that plastic off of the bottom of the header pins. Get a knife or a flat screwdriver and get between it and the PCB and just remove it. You'll see the solder pads then.

EOS switches were originally designed to transfer the power from the "Impact" coil on the flipper, to the "Hold" coil on the flipper. There are two interwoven coils on the flipper coil. Modern solid state games don't use the EOS switch that way anymore, they actually control both coils via the computer and switch automatically. Now the switch simply confirms to the computer that it's happend so it sorta doesn't matter, but I have replaced the switches in games that had them removed and it made the game feel better.

#25 5 years ago
Quoted from awarner:

In your first picture of the back of the header pins, just pull that plastic off of the bottom of the header pins. Get a knife or a flat screwdriver and get between it and the PCB and just remove it. You'll see the solder pads then.

That's a single-sided PCB... the pads are on the other side. Just pull the connector off to see the solder.

#26 5 years ago
Quoted from awarner:

In your first picture of the back of the header pins, just pull that plastic off of the bottom of the header pins. Get a knife or a flat screwdriver and get between it and the PCB and just remove it. You'll see the solder pads then.

Quoted from mattosborn:

That's a single-sided PCB... the pads are on the other side. Just pull the connector off to see the solder.

I was actually able to simply pinch my wire in place without soldering anything and that restored the light column. I'm going to leave it like that for now as it can be removed by just taking out a single light. If I get adventurous enough, I'll pry up the thin plastic and try to find the solder points.

Here are some pictures of my repair work. This is the work I did to reconnect the saucer light (the one where I had a mil of wire). I used an exacto to carefully remove some of the plastic and soldered a wire onto the connector. I like to use stripped wire casing and super glue instead of tape, so that's what you see in the pic. Turns out there is a diode right next to the connector in the other saucer which probably explains why this one was cut so close. Diode went and they had to trim it. Probably couldn't do the fine repair upright, so they hacked it together. If I'd known about the diode, I could have included it in my repair, but I didn't discover it until later - still works.

WP_20140406_011.jpg

Here is my switch soldering station that I rigged up to solder diodes onto new switches. At first I was confused about why the diodes were needed, but when I got a close look, I realized it was between NC and ground and the wires are actually connected to NO and NC. If you are reading this and that doesn't make sense then just do exactly what was already in place and it will work. I reused the old diodes . . . sue me

WP_20140406_009.jpg

Quoted from ignusfast:

It's attached with rivets - you can buy a tool-less rivet kit like [http://www.pinbits.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=72] which works, but it was a bit hit-or-miss when I did it. I finally got a good, lasting pair of rivets in there, but I'd never done it before and it took several tries...

Finally, here is my new ramp riveted in place. I used a drill to drill out the old rivets, but I still had to use a screwdriver to push the backs of the rivets in so that the drilled rivet would pop out. Took me a while to figure out which drill bit to use. Using the press kit referenced earlier ended up being straightforward. I didn't waste any clips, but it took more force than I thought it would to get them hammered into place.

WP_20140406_010.jpg

I didn't reconnect the EOS switches yet. I'll leave that for now.

#27 5 years ago

It's opening is 3/4". What are these called? - molex connector, i would get yourself a pin extractor and a few bags of all sizes of new male and female crimp on connectors for your machines. then you can push those out and make new harnesses as you need in no time.

#28 5 years ago

The next thing for this RFM is to improve the movement of the martian solenoids. I don't know anything about solenoid maintenance, but I've seen reference to replacing sleeves (don't know what that is). Right now it/they move but they look kinda weak. If they are as dirty as everything else then they need to be cleaned. Is there a simply way to clean them up?

Quoted from ls1chris:

It's opening is 3/4". What are these called? - molex connector, i would get yourself a pin extractor and a few bags of all sizes of new male and female crimp on connectors for your machines. then you can push those out and make new harnesses as you need in no time.

Excellent suggestion - I will look for that as those items could help with a lot of projects.

#29 5 years ago

From what I've read - lube is a bad thing. . . .

Can I just open up the assembly, clean the plunger (5) with alcohol and replace the tubing (7)?

RFMMartian.png

#30 5 years ago
Quoted from wongojack:

From what I've read - lube is a bad thing. . . .
Can I just open up the assembly, clean the plunger (5) with alcohol and replace the tubing (7)?

RFMMartian.png 27 KB

Clean clean clean. Most Lube will cause issues later when it hardens, dust sticks to it and things may become hellish. Very very very few things in pinball need lube. In a pinch I have even cleaned, as stated above, my coil sleeve also. Replacing those is best though since they are so cheap!

#31 5 years ago
Quoted from wongojack:

From what I've read - lube is a bad thing. . . .
Can I just open up the assembly, clean the plunger (5) with alcohol and replace the tubing (7)?

RFMMartian.png 27 KB

this isn't specific to this machine, it's true of all machines...

yes, lubing solenoids is a very bad thing...

take it apart, clean EVERYTHING and replace the coil sleeve...

#32 5 years ago

yup lube is bad my SWE1 had white lithium on everything all gunked up and full of dust , the coils hardly cycled . if i had to lube i would only use powder graphite

#33 5 years ago

Has anyone added this specific hole guard: http://www.marcospecialties.com/pinball-parts/HG-19 ?

If so, how is it?

#34 5 years ago
Quoted from ls1chris:

yup lube is bad my SWE1 had white lithium on everything all gunked up and full of dust , the coils hardly cycled . if i had to lube i would only use powder graphite

NO LUBE ANYWHERE EXCEPT INSIDE MOTOR GEAR ASSEMBLIES!!! NO GRAPHITE!!! NO NOTHING!!!

The picture below is the results of WD-40 sprayed on a mechanism in the bottom of an EM game. The owner had plexiglass for the top glass and it melted into the playfield. The heat caused the backglass to shatter!

If you listen to nothing else that I say, LISTEN TO THIS!!!

Fire.jpg

PS - The owner gave me this game after it happened.

#35 5 years ago
Quoted from wongojack:

Has anyone added this specific hole guard: http://www.marcospecialties.com/pinball-parts/HG-19 ?
If so, how is it?

I used that one in conjunction with a cliffy protector. makes that stroke of luck hole virtually bullet-proof!

RFM protector.JPG

#36 5 years ago
Quoted from j_m_:

I used that one in conjunction with a cliffy protector. makes that stroke of luck hole virtually bullet-proof!

Thanks! I haven't been able to find the Cliffy protector on sale for this game anywhere (yet)

#37 5 years ago

passionforpinball.com ... order direct from cliffy
http://passionforpinball.com/rfm_pro.htm
email him and he'll pp invoice you

#38 5 years ago
Quoted from Zitt:

passionforpinball.com ... order direct from cliffy
http://passionforpinball.com/rfm_pro.htm
email him and he'll pp invoice you

Awesome, I've already sent him an email.

Mine looks about as bad as the one in the "before" picture on that site.

#39 5 years ago

Wongo, I have a brand new hole protector never used. I will send it to you if you want it. PM me your address..photo.JPG

#40 5 years ago
Quoted from wiggy07:

Wongo, I have a brand new hole protector never used. I will send it to you if you want it. PM me your address..

PM'd

I replaced the power supply and CPU fan last night. I had an AT power supply (knew I was saving that for something) and I bought a 50x10mm CPU fan at Fry's. The new PSU didn't fit quite right, so I had to put it in upside down which means it's only attached with 2 screws. I also cleaned the CPU and added heat xfer compound to the heatsink before putting it back on. Here's a picture of the computer with the CPU fan off. I actually have the new supply connected in this pic, but it is off camera.

RFM_Computer.jpg

I also re-glued the foam that is attached to the top of the case. I thought about removing it, but it wasn't obstructing the CPU fan (yet) and it took like 10 seconds to stick back on with spray adhesive.

#41 5 years ago

I played the game A LOT this weekend. I've still got some maintenance to do, and I need to get a 10 pin molex connector to add my amp, but I've really been able to enjoy the game.

I had to replace some optos, and the coin door mech freaked out on me - I just disconnected it. It seems my cab is from France and so is my coin door - weird.

One thing I've noticed that I can't explain is that sometimes after the ball is ejected from SofLuck, the eject sound effect plays about 10x. The popper doesn't fire after the ball is ejected - the sound effect just plays 10x in a row. Anyone ever hit that problem?

#42 5 years ago
Quoted from wongojack:

One thing I've noticed that I can't explain is that sometimes after the ball is ejected from SofLuck, the eject sound effect plays about 10x. The popper doesn't fire after the ball is ejected - the sound effect just plays 10x in a row. Anyone ever hit that problem?

I can't say that I've ever experienced that issue. what software version are you on? and have you checked/cleaned the optos for the stroke of luck?

you might also want to check the memory dimm. I'm not saying that's where your problem lies, but it always easier to eliminate any potential problem area.

#43 5 years ago
Quoted from j_m_:

I can't say that I've ever experienced that issue. what software version are you on? and have you checked/cleaned the optos for the stroke of luck?
you might also want to check the memory dimm. I'm not saying that's where your problem lies, but it always easier to eliminate any potential problem area.

I'm on software ver 1.5. I wasn't in a hurry to update to 1.6 because someone indicate it only fixes a restart bug. That was actually the first thing I thought of to address the issue.

Regarding the "memory dimm," Do you mean in the PC or on the main board? Both?

I probably had RAM to upgrade this PC at one point, but I bet that stuff is long gone now.

Edit - I looked at the Opto schematic in the manual. I did have to replace the Jet Exit optos which shares some wiring with the Popper that seems to be triggering the sound effect. I may test disconnecting the jet exit optos and see if the problem will still replicate. I guess it is possible that as part of my replacement, I caused this. If disconnecting the jet exit works then I'll have to think harder about that.

Also - one of the rivets on my ramp came off, so I'll need to hammer that back on . . . .

#44 5 years ago

yeah, I haven't upgraded past 1.5 myself on mine

the memory dimm is on the pc motherboard. the RFMs and SWEP1s came with a whopping 64MB of non-ecc memory, but you can still order new memory off of ebay (see the link below). I upgraded mine to 256MB (w/ two 128MB boards) so that the animations don't stutter (however, boot up time is now a bit longer since the system does a memory check on power up).

you can add a maximum of 512MB (two 256MB boards), but I didn't see any additional benefit over 256MB

ebay.com link » 128mb Third Party Memory 16x64 168 Pin Pc100 8ns 3 3v Non Ecc Sdram Ram Dimm

be careful with hammering the rivet. the skip ramp is rather thin, and you don't want to accidentally dent it otherwise it won't lie flat against the playfield when it's in the [down] position. it might be easier to find someone locally with a rivet press to fix your problem. if you can't find anyone, you can send it to me and I'll do it for free (you'll just have to pay shipping both ways)

#45 5 years ago
Quoted from wongojack:

The target will move up and down and lock into place. It's possible the only thing wrong is the switch is missing. In order to connect the switch I need a wired connector like this one. It's opening is 3/4". What are these called?

I too had the drop target switch missing. Having the switch in place makes more difference in game play than might be evident.

You have the bracket, so that's one less part you'll need. If you have a manual you can easily identify all the parts you'll need (check ipdb). The bad part is the only place I could find the parts was at pinballspareparts.com.au in Aus. Ended up spending $14 to ship $7 in parts, but came really quick.

Aside from the actual switch and diode, you will need:

Guide Actuator 03-8630
01-8600 01-8600
Nut Plate for Microswitch - #2-56 01-8240
general switch 2 pin cbl H-23019-4
Machine Screw 2-56 x 5/8" 4002-01105-10 (qty 2)

#46 5 years ago

Well, I broke it. I mentioned above that the coin door "freaked out." It was triggering a switch that is not used by the game. I unplugged it on Saturday and just kept going. Tonight I was troubleshooting the eject sound effect that keeps playing after the ball is ejected and I decided to re-connect the coin door. I did this because it seems the coin door mech connects to the same board as the optos. I was thinking that it might help my sound effect problem somehow to reconnect.

After I did that very bad things happened. The game now acts like the door is always open and none of the diagnostic buttons work. I actually did read some troubleshooting about this problem. I think I'm going to start with fuses. Because I can't restore high voltage, I can't tell if any of the high volt fuses are blown, but I'm pretty sure there should be a green one lighting that isn't now. Can anyone tell me which fuse lights are on with the coin door open on a completely working machine for reference? A picture would be nice if you can snap one for me.

Edit - I'm stuck at work so can't do any testing. The game did the same thing this morning as it did last night - acts like coin door is open and none of the diag buttons work. Here is a thread on another site that I found about a similar problem: http://pinball.gamehourz.com/TECH-2000-Revenge-Mars-ftopict215020.html

Also, the coin door board has nothing to do with the optos. That was just a misunderstanding by me . . . ugh

I really hope this is a fuse . . . .

#47 5 years ago

I just looked at mine, and took some photos for you.

With the playfield HV disabled (ie: coin door open), starting from the right there are four red LEDs lit, and one green LED. They are all sequential in order.

With the playfield HV enabled (ie: coin door closed, or switch pulled out), all the fuse LEDs are lit red, except for the one that is lit green.

In both cases, there is a solid red LED lit around the middle of the board as well as a flashing red LED further to the left of the large capacitor. You can see the flashing one lit in the "enabled" photo.

Good luck!

RFM-HVdisabled.JPG RFM-HVenabled.JPG
#48 5 years ago
Quoted from mjannusch:

I just looked at mine, and took some photos for you.
With the playfield HV disabled (ie: coin door open), starting from the right there are four red LEDs lit, and one green LED. They are all sequential in order.
With the playfield HV enabled (ie: coin door closed, or switch pulled out), all the fuse LEDs are lit red, except for the one that is lit green.
In both cases, there is a solid red LED lit around the middle of the board as well as a flashing red LED further to the left of the large capacitor. You can see the flashing one lit in the "enabled" photo.
Good luck!

Awesome! This thread is now becoming a repository for RFM troubleshooting in itself.

Edit: I replaced Fuse 108 (the green one) and the game came back to life. What a relief.

#49 5 years ago

"One thing I've noticed that I can't explain is that sometimes after the ball is ejected from SofLuck, the eject sound effect plays about 10x. The popper doesn't fire after the ball is ejected - the sound effect just plays 10x in a row. Anyone ever hit that problem? "

All I had to do was play the game with the glass off to discover that this seems to be happening because the plunger doesn't go back down after ejecting the ball. My next move is to clean all the solenoids, so I guess I'll start with this one.

#50 5 years ago

replace the coil sleeve as well while you're at it. I did that will all of the coils the last time that I cleaned my game

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