(Topic ID: 287373)

Replacement Bally Rectifier Board AS-2518-49

By RDBowers

3 years ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 22 posts
  • 13 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by pindude80
  • Topic is favorited by 7 Pinsiders

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Topic poll

“Which rectifier would you recommend?”

  • Pinhead Electronics (Pinball Resources) 2 votes
    13%
  • XPin (Big Daddy Electronics) 1 vote
    6%
  • Pin-Tek (K's Arcade.Net) 0 votes
  • Gulf Pinball (K's Arcade.Net) 0 votes
  • NVRAM.weebly.com (aka barakandl) 10 votes
    63%
  • Anarchy PCB (Pinball Life) 3 votes
    19%

(16 votes)

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#1 3 years ago
#2 3 years ago

Nvram-weebly and pinball life boards are both very popular choices in my area.

#4 3 years ago

I put the Pinhead boards in both of my Bally’s. Got them from PBR. Easy to install and are working great.

#5 3 years ago

@Barakandl's (nvram.weebly.com) rectifier board has the beefiest heatsink on the feature lamp bridge rectifier. Important for thermals on the bridge if you're staying with incandescents considering the higher feature lamp count (and current draw) on Future Spa.

#7 3 years ago

RDBowers I have bought both the fully assembled and bare boards from Andrew aka barakandl

#8 3 years ago
Quoted from emsrph:

Another vote for the weebly board, especially if you build yourself. Here's the correct link:
https://pinside.com/pinball/market/shops/1055-nvramweeblycom/01123--new-bally-stern-rectifier-board-as-2518-18-ta-100

emsrph Thanks! corrected address in the original post.

#9 3 years ago

dangerwil Thanks. Added to the list in the original post.

#10 3 years ago

Thanks for the comments bluespin dangerwil eagle18 Quench emsrph @canadianpinball.
I added a poll to the post to help automate the count.

#11 3 years ago

The screw down terminal is a good idea. Only concern is that the wires are often heavily tarnished and there is high current. Maybe replace the transformer wires at the same time but then it's not solder less install.

From a dolly Parton rectifier i am swapping out today. Original piddly feature lamp bridge went short last night. Seems pretty common for the wires to look like this.
20210207_142255 (resized).jpg20210207_142255 (resized).jpg

#12 3 years ago

There's more here than just wire mounts. Somebody needs to do some brute force comparisons on these.
For proper evaluation - you must know the components by mfr and specs. Several do not provide enough info to do a thorough evaluation.

Personally, I prefer soldered connections for the wires, how often do you really plan on changing this board? Spring loaded wire clips - would you be willing to risk these springs going bad due to heat and age over the years?

Fuse clips -- did they use high current fuse clips for all fuses? Or only for select fuses? For any of the fuses? Cheap Chinese fuse clips? No future Data East fuse clip problems in the works?

Test points -- just a pad or hole in the board? Or is there are a real test point that you can probe or clip onto? Real test points are less than 5c each. Why sell a board for $60 or more if you scrimp on less than 30 cents worth of parts?

Board composition -- can it withstand full current load capabilities?
Some of these board makers do not specify copper thickness. Is the copper sized in accordance with Mil-Std-275? (Now part of IPC commercial specs but I cannot remember spec number off the top of my head)
A 20 amp fuse requires a minimum thickness of of 2 ounce copper plus very, very wide traces (about 150 mils or more). And a preferred thickness of 3 or 4 ounces.

Did they completely eliminate relying on the top of board solder pads for connecting to the headers? This was a major source of problems for the old original rectifier boards.

Any thermal reduction such as oversized (e.g. 15W) resistors? Or did they go to hugely increased snubber resistor value to reduce heat but also reduce effectiveness?

Heat sinks on all bridges? Or just BR1? Are the bridge rectifier heat sinks sufficient? Should be a thermal resistance of less than 10. Standard TO-220 transistor heat sinks used by some are too small and are > 13. Note that one of the boards went with discrete diodes for the two lower current bridges. Although this does not allow heat sinking - it is still a valid idea as the overall heat per device is reduced by distributing the heat amongst four devices. This was one of the better changes that Williams made with their WPC95 power driver board.

How about liability issues? Did they make an attempt to at least make the 120VAC stuff somewhat protected? Or wide open for all fingers? Did they put fuse condoms on the fuses? If so - some of us know what happens to these cheap protectors when the fuses heat up.

#13 3 years ago

Thanks for all of the advice. Based on the poll and comments I have decided to go with NVRAM's Rectifier Board DIY Kit. barakandl has also been super helpful in answering my questions.

NVRAM.weebly.com (aka @barakandl)
https://nvram.weebly.com/new-pcbs.html

1 week later
#14 3 years ago

Got the kit yesterday and put it together this morning. I also added loops to the test pads. Overall I am happy with the results so far.

I also saw Third Coast Pinball sells a Bally Power Supply Wiring Harness. I was interested in getting one, but it is out of stock.

PXL_20210221_053708504 (resized).jpgPXL_20210221_053708504 (resized).jpg
PXL_20210221_053731498 (resized).jpgPXL_20210221_053731498 (resized).jpg

[Changed photo to show correct stand-off orientation]

#15 3 years ago
Quoted from RDBowers:

Got the kit yesterday and put it together this morning. I also added loops to the test pads. Overall I am happy with the results so far.
[quoted image]

Looks like you did a very nice job with the soldering.

Reverse the replacement mounting stand offs. The screw head + washer goes onto the metal mount bracket. The snap press in part goes into the PCB. The way you have it the washers could short things out if it bites through the solder mask layer. The originals stand offs could be reused too but they are often broken so that is why I include the new ones.

The loops soldered onto the test pad is a decent compromise if you really want them. Someone always beats me up about test pads vs hooks insinuating "what else did I cheap out on". The issue is not with the cost of the test hook, it is hand assembly. You wouldn't think someone like test hooks take a lot of time but any hand stuffed part that can reasonably left out I will take. Pad vs hook I don't see a huge advantage. I also really don't like the idea of people probing around on this board anyways since line voltage and +230v is present. 95%+ of customers will never be probing on the boards anyway too so they don't care pad vs hook.

Quoted from RDBowers:

I also saw Third Coast Pinball sells a Bally Power Supply Wiring Harness. I was interested in getting one, but it is out of stock.
[quoted image]

Replacing the transformer tap wiring at the same time is probably a good idea and I know some people do this with every rectifier board. The original wires are often in such bad shape they will not even want to take solder. Stripping back an inch or two more will sometimes find not corroded wire, but you can't cut too much away and still get it to fit. I did not look at third coast's listing but keep in mind the -49 rectifier board has one or two extra wires for the feature lamp that may not exist in a wire kit built for first -18 generation rectifier board.

#16 3 years ago

Emailed Shawn (@mk1mod0) at Third Coast Pinball and he has the power supply wiring kit available.
https://pinside.com/pinball/market/shops/1041-third-coast-pinball/00474-power-supply-wiring-kit

Ordered it today. Now its in the hands of USPS and Canada Post. When I get it installed, I will post some pictures.

#17 3 years ago
Quoted from barakandl:

I did not look at third coast's listing but keep in mind the -49 rectifier board has one or two extra wires for the feature lamp that may not exist in a wire kit built for first -18 generation rectifier board.

Comes with double wires for all lighting and solenoids for the modern boards set up for it as well as two pieces to redo the transformer tap connections.

Shawn

10 months later
#18 2 years ago

I need a new rectifier board for my Harlem Globetrotters. I was planning on getting one an assembed board from NVRAM Weebly but I just looked on his site and didn't see one; I only saw the bare board and DIY kit. Does anyone know if he still sells the assembled kit?

#19 2 years ago
Quoted from pindude80:

I need a new rectifier board for my Harlem Globetrotters. I was planning on getting one an assembed board from NVRAM Weebly but I just looked on his site and didn't see one; I only saw the bare board and DIY kit. Does anyone know if he still sells the assembled kit?

You can PM him
barakandl

#20 2 years ago

on those kits, I try to float the long sand resistor on the right side...it get's warm(normal)

#21 2 years ago

Fully assembled and complete with all new connectors for $59.95

https://www.pinballlife.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=PBL-100-0070-00

1 month later
#22 2 years ago

This is what I ended up buying. It worked out great!

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