Remote battery holder smoking issue


By Neuromancer87

3 months ago


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  • 42 posts
  • 26 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 months ago by DaveH
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#1 3 months ago

Installing a remote battery holder on my Stern LotR and I think I did everything right except when I install the batteries it starts smoking where I soldered the positive wire. I am hoping I didn't damage my board. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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#2 3 months ago

Looks like that extra bit of wire sticking out of the + terminal is touching the boards ground screw area.

Also are you sure where you solidered the wires that they are actually touching the +/- traces on the actual board and not just the battery holder springs.

Also is that a diode on the + lead under the heat shrink? And if so, it isn't needed. But is it the right way?

#3 3 months ago

Rip that battery holder out and install NVRAM. 30 second upgrade since the old RAM is in a socket already and never have to worry about batteries again.
http://www.pinitech.com/products/6264_nvram.php

#4 3 months ago
Quoted from PinballManiac40:

Rip that battery holder out and install NVRAM. 30 second upgrade since the old RAM is in a socket already and never have to worry about batteries again.
http://www.pinitech.com/products/6264_nvram.php

Thank you but I want to install a remote battery holder not an NVRAM.

#5 3 months ago
Quoted from erak:

Looks like that extra bit of wire sticking out of the + terminal is touching the boards ground screw area.

(It's not touching it.) But I cut it off anyway same problem now what?

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#6 3 months ago

I had this problem too before and the remote battery makers need to have more thorough intructions cause it can cause fire and ruin games if not installed properly/ That being said...you're doing it wrong!

#7 3 months ago
Quoted from homebrood:

I had this problem too before and the remote battery makers need to have more thorough intructions cause it can cause fire and ruin games if not installed properly/ That being said...you're doing it wrong!

Thank you, helpful.

#8 3 months ago

I haven't had a single problem with the remote battery holders I DIYed in my bally machines.
http://pinwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Remote_battery_holder
I don't have a clue what you've done; but I'd recheck the installation and make sure you've done it right.

Maybe explaining what you did and why would help us more than a picture.
IE I can't see how you've connected the neg and positive to the remote holder so unsure if it's wired right.
Smoke is usually an indication of a short so I'm inclinded to believe something is either reverse wired or shorted to something unexpected.

#9 3 months ago
Quoted from Zitt:

I haven't had a single problem with the remote battery holders I DIYed in my bally machines.
http://pinwiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Remote_battery_holder
I don't have a clue what you've done; but I'd recheck the installation and make sure you've done it right.
Maybe explaining what you did and why would help us more than a picture.
IE I can't see how you've connected the neg and positive to the remote holder so unsure if it's wired right.
Smoke is usually an indication of a short so I'm inclinded to believe something is either reverse wired or shorted to something unexpected.

Okay so I soldered the red wire coming from the remote to the positive connection on the existing holder. I soldered the black wire from the remote to the loops on the negative contact.

#10 3 months ago

Battery holders on MPUs are not all wired the same. It is best to remove the original battery holder and note where the positive and negative cumulative connections are made to the MPU board. Connect the remote holder to these connections.

Examining the MPU/CPU layout drawing from the manual associated with Lord of the rings "seems" to indicate you have incorrectly wired the connections on the original battery holder. Without seeing the wiring side of the MPU/CPU it is not
possible for me to make a conclusive statement.

But if you look at the manual, Section 5, Chapter 4, page 140, CPU layout, you will note a positive and negative symbols
Outside of the on-board battery box that seem to indicate the cumulative battery voltage connections. Examining the wiring
side of the board should confirm the proper connection points for the remote battery box.

There isn't one instruction possible to cover all of the remote application of battery boxes as the board designs differ.

#11 3 months ago

Aren't you supposed to have 3 batteries in the remote holder to get your 4.5 volts?

Also, see the + and the - symbols next to the on-board battery holder. I believe those are the terminals you need to use.

#13 3 months ago

Okay I got un-lazy and ripped the old battery holder off. Soldered wires to the correct terminals. All is well. Bada-bing-bada-boom. Lesson is, don't do things half-assed.

10
#14 3 months ago
Quoted from Neuromancer87:

Lesson is, don't do things half-assed.

And yet you still have batteries in the game. I realize you downvoted the person that suggested NVRAM because it isn't what you were doing, but that's the best way to protect it now and in the future. The board already has the socket for it.

#15 3 months ago

Another vote for NVRAM. Remote battery holders are really just a bandage for an antiquated system.

#16 3 months ago

There will always be people telling you what to do, fortunately not everyone does that.

Brad

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#17 3 months ago
Quoted from DaveH:

And yet you still have batteries in the game. I realize you downvoted the person that suggested NVRAM because it isn't what you were doing, but that's the best way to protect it now and in the future. The board already has the socket for it.

Batteries are required for timekeeping and modes that rely on the realtime clock. They still have their purpose in some scenarios.

#18 3 months ago
Quoted from Crash:

Batteries are required for timekeeping and modes that rely on the realtime clock. They still have their purpose in some scenarios.

Which retaining the batteries is useful scenario does Stern Lord of the Rings have?

#19 3 months ago
Quoted from homebrood:

I had this problem too before and the remote battery makers need to have more thorough intructions cause it can cause fire and ruin games if not installed properly/ That being said...you're doing it wrong!

I would not necessarily say someone selling a battery holder needs better instructions (my pinballs did not come with instructions on where to put them, but I would guess not across a circuit board - just a silly example); more like anybody attempting to do electronic work and modifications needs to understand what they are doing before attempting. Otherwise, even a small job should be done by someone who is qualified.

@OP Yes, your wires originally "burned up" because all you did was wire 2 wires backwards and basically just created a short across your new battery holder. The blocking diode tried all it could to hold back the battery current; causing diode to get hot enough to melt things down. The holder you should have puechased for your game should have been one without the diode in the first place...

Luckily nothing got damaged during a mod to help prevent potential future damage.
Glad you got it figured out and that it is all working.

#20 3 months ago

Nvram is a great solution but it can have some minor, but solvable issues.

The fit of the stern socket can be quite loose for the nvram and can cause the memory to be occasionally erased due to a loose fit. This has happened on two of my sterns on location.

Technically it's plug and play but if you want it to work perfectly for years, the old socket should be desoldered and the included socket should be installed. This is what I'm doing now.

-12
#21 3 months ago

Not to mention it's a bad value? An NVRAM costs $39.95. Ok. A remote battery holder and 30 years worth of batteries costs ~$21-$23...

Thank you all who came here to belittle, berate, or highjack the thread when I'm asking a simple question about how to wire in a remote battery holder.

Quoted from pinballkyle:

Nvram is a great solution but it does have its downfalls too.
The fit of the stern socket can be quite loose for the nvram and can cause the memory to be occasionally erased due to a loose fit. This has happened on two of my sterns on location.
Technically it's plug and play but if you want it to work perfectly for years, the old socket should be desoldered and the included socket should be installed. This is what I'm doing now.

#22 3 months ago
Quoted from Neuromancer87:

Not to mention it's a bad value? An NVRAM costs $39.95. Ok. A remote battery holder and 30 years worth of batteries costs ~$21-$23...
Thank you all who came here to belittle, berate, or highjack the thread when I'm asking a simple question about how to wire in a remote battery holder.

....or as much as a couple of bucks if you make it yourself. Nice passive aggressive finish too. IMO, pay attention to the advice people here on pinside give you.

-2
#23 3 months ago
Quoted from Firebaall:

....or as much as a couple of bucks if you make it yourself. Nice passive aggressive finish too. IMO, pay attention to the advice people here on pinside give you.

IMO, don't tell other people what to do.

#24 3 months ago
Quoted from Neuromancer87:

A remote battery holder and 30 years worth of batteries costs ~$21-$23...

Plus the pleasure of changing out those batteries annually or opening up your game to find they leaked, destroying your battery holder (and hopefully nothing else)...

Just remember to change them out regularly!

#25 3 months ago
Quoted from Neuromancer87:

Not to mention it's a bad value? An NVRAM costs $39.95. Ok. A remote battery holder and 30 years worth of batteries costs ~$21-$23...
Thank you all who came here to belittle, berate, or highjack the thread when I'm asking a simple question about how to wire in a remote battery holder.

You did not ask how to do it, then follow advice. You hooked everything up wrong and as quick and dirty as you could, screwed up but claimed it seemed correct, then asked for help and that is what you got.

Were you looking for a snowflake hand out of how great a job you did and hoping there was someone else to blame for your ignorance?

Weird to complain to people trying to help...and not one person was off topic, overly rude, or offering bad suggestions....

#26 3 months ago
Quoted from Neuromancer87:

Thank you all who came here to belittle, berate, or highjack the thread when I'm asking a simple question about how to wire in a remote battery holder.

I did belittle you a bit. But only because I feel you are making a bad decision and I felt it appropriate to point out you were doing it half assed after said the lesson was to not do it half assed. But of course it's your right to make all the bad decisions you want. Now I hope they leak.

#27 3 months ago

NVRAMs $15ea for 1, $10ea for 10+ and free ship.

http://nvram.weebly.com/

Quoted from pinballkyle:

Nvram is a great solution but it can have some minor, but solvable issues.
The fit of the stern socket can be quite loose for the nvram and can cause the memory to be occasionally erased due to a loose fit. This has happened on two of my sterns on location.
Technically it's plug and play but if you want it to work perfectly for years, the old socket should be desoldered and the included socket should be installed. This is what I'm doing now.

I have found the opposite. NVRAM modules (at least the ones I assemble) use round pins. These are actually a hair bigger then the standard flat stamped legs on SRAMs giving a very snug fit on Stern games.

If you go NVRAM, then take it out and put a regular SRAM back in, the original SRAM may be a loose fit.

Good quality machine pin style socket is probably ideal for NVRAM modules, but the twin leaf standard style sockets work fine too.

#28 3 months ago

Also NVRAMs for $10ea in a 5-PACK, special for this weekend..

https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/pinitech-memorial-day-weekend-sale-nvram-free-ship-over-99

Agreed with barakandl, machine pin should fit snug in the socket, haven't heard of issues with them being loose. Suppose if they were inserted many times and the socket contacts stretched out that could happen. Or if something with thicker header pins was inserted in the socket before.

#29 3 months ago

So I take it the post and neg where wired essential together the first time. Then you removed original holder and figured it out. Sounds great!
Yeah I was opposed to NV when they where offered at much higher prices but at
http://nvram.weebly.com/
Definately the way to go. I had memorex that where only six months or so go and I was super lucky I caught it.
As far a the RTC thing goes, it would seem to me that say Midnight madness mode or anything clock needed would be very random so wouldn't that be a benefit??

#30 3 months ago

You are messing too see what peoples reactions are...
Nobody solders red to ground.
Made me laugh though
Bye now

#31 3 months ago

Good to know. The socket on my LOTR seemed pretty janky so it was probably messed with before.

Quoted from barakandl:
NVRAMs $15ea for 1, $10ea for 10+ and free ship.
http://nvram.weebly.com/

I have found the opposite. NVRAM modules (at least the ones I assemble) use round pins. These are actually a hair bigger then the standard flat stamped legs on SRAMs giving a very snug fit on Stern games.
If you go NVRAM, then take it out and put a regular SRAM back in, the original SRAM may be a loose fit.
Good quality machine pin style socket is probably ideal for NVRAM modules, but the twin leaf standard style sockets work fine too.

#32 3 months ago

For god sakes just do it like this, it will never come off unless you want it to, super easy and you can save all your settings and do this live

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#33 3 months ago

Wow! You're kind of a fucking asshole. I bet you slap your kids when they spill their milk.

Quoted from pacmanretro:

You did not ask how to do it, then follow advice. You hooked everything up wrong and as quick and dirty as you could, screwed up but claimed it seemed correct, then asked for help and that is what you got.
Were you looking for a snowflake hand out of how great a job you did and hoping there was someone else to blame for your ignorance?
Weird to complain to people trying to help...and not one person was off topic, overly rude, or offering bad suggestions....

#34 3 months ago
Quoted from Neuromancer87:

Wow! You're kind of a fucking asshole. I bet you slap your kids when they spill their milk.

Excuse me? That is inappropriate and uncalled for. I originally tried to honestly help you, but I refuse to engage in such childish, arrogant, offensive behavior.

I'm shocked that you would joke about any sort of domestic violence.

#35 3 months ago

Boy, this thread went sour quickly!

I would respectfully suggest to the OP that if you are asking for some technical advice you should be very grateful for it. This type of specialist advice could cost hundreds anywhere else.

#36 3 months ago

Experienced technicians, game owners, and engineers are all trying to give you advice here in order to help bulletproof your game. It would be very beneficial to take advantage of their combined years of experience.

They took their spare time and freely offered their advice for *your* benefit. Responding in the manner that you did was not cordial or respectful. You might find that others may be less inclined to help you in the future if this how you choose to continue to respond in discussions.

Offering an apology might be something to consider, but that's up to you. Like the others in this thread, I can only offer advice--it's up to you to take advantage of it.

#37 3 months ago
Quoted from Neuromancer87:

Not to mention it's a bad value? An NVRAM costs $39.95. Ok. A remote battery holder and 30 years worth of batteries costs ~$21-$23...
Thank you all who came here to belittle, berate, or highjack the thread when I'm asking a simple question about how to wire in a remote battery holder.

Just checked AliExpress, try $1.78 for Nvram...My $2 Nvram have been going strong over a year now, zero issues....

OP, take a look after you take your meds, which it appears you forget this evening....Unless you have a game that has midnight madness or some other reason to maintain a clock, the batteries need to go...

#38 3 months ago
Quoted from Irishbastard:

Just checked AliExpress, try $1.78 for Nvram...My $2 Nvram have been going strong over a year now, zero issues....
OP, take a look after you take your meds, which it appears you forget this evening....Unless you have a game that has midnight madness or some other reason to maintain a clock, the batteries need to go...

I've had my AliEpress NVRAM in over 30 games with the oldest being in for 3 years. No problems with any of them. Given that this is a game with socketed RAM, it is incredibly foolish not to put in NVRAM. Takes less time to do that than all the monkeying around with the remote battery holder. At $2-3 per chip, less expensive than batteries too.

#39 3 months ago

why advice this guy to NVRAM?

He would insert them wrong anyway, and the complain that they dont work....

#40 3 months ago
Quoted from Neuromancer87:

IMO, don't tell other people what to do.

You're free to have your opinion, but just sit back and consider the source. Think about that for a bit.

#41 3 months ago
Quoted from Homepin:

Boy, this thread went sour quickly!
I would respectfully suggest to the OP that if you are asking for some technical advice you should be very grateful for it. This type of specialist advice could cost hundreds anywhere else.

Homepin, you are so right. I am not always here helping, but I like to feel I offer my best advice I can. After nearly 25 years involved in coin op, I hope I have something to offer. People like this really make me question why I bother offering free advice (it isn't always free as you said) ... if it wasn't for the generosity of others to me, and the appreciation of many, these type of people would consume my soul and leave me bitter and not helping anybody.

To all those that were appreciative of advice from me, and all those that have helped me over the years, thank you.

And no, this is not to stir things up; I am honestly realizing how much I appreciate the good part of this community.

#42 3 months ago
Quoted from pacmanretro:

People like this really make me question why I bother offering free advice (it isn't always free as you said) ... if it wasn't for the generosity of others to me, and the appreciation of many, these type of people would consume my soul and leave me bitter and not helping anybody.

You do it to help people. Someone might read this thread later, and who knows, maybe they will learn something. Putting knowledge into subjects like this is always helpful in the long run. I still point out the time LTG helped fix the flipper on my LOTR years before it happened by posting the solution for someone else. Others appreciate it.

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