(Topic ID: 144405)

rate my board soldering -repining GI on system 11


By boscokid

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 17 posts
  • 8 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by ChrisHibler
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

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#1 3 years ago

Step 1

Ok all.It's been over 30 years since the US Navy asked me to solder anything but I was actually in school to be taught how to do board work correctly.

Fast forward three decades and I need to replace the GI molex plugs on my new Jokerz. I only have a 40 watt Weller with a thick chisel tip, so i borrowed a long in the tooth solder station from a friend (no name, no working dials, no country of manufacture but obviously was nice equipment at one time, and the tip was small enough for board work.

I had solder braid and some 60/40 .32 solder. goal was to remove two sets of burned up pins and replace with new ones from Great Plains Electronics. i did lay down so fresh solder on the pins traces I was clearing as I think it makes wicking much easier

Before - burnt connectors:

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Before - burnt pins on the backside

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After - new pins attached

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After - new pins on the backside of the board

So, Pinside, please feel free to critique my soldering. Does this look like passable work/? I verified there is no continuity between the trace pads and verified there is continuity at the end of the respective traces.

More importantly am i ready to replace the 100v diodes with 91v on my power supply board/?

Part 2 will be forming the new Molex connectors

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#2 3 years ago

Looks good!

#3 3 years ago

Amazon was supposed to have a crimper in my hand Saturday by 8pm but that came and went, Sunday was a no show. Checked the mail today, no crimper. SO off to Great Plains to order what i should've ordered the first time

Anyway , these wires are cut back and stripped the proper length

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These are the two culprits J9 and J7 on the interconnect board. Symptom was GI completely out on the entire left side of the play field - - both upper and lower

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#4 3 years ago

got this tool:

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did these connections:

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#5 3 years ago

Good job . I have never got around to doing one of mine but looking at yours it will be this weekend

#6 3 years ago

Not bad. The left connector looks like the solder flowed better. Perhaps linger a bit longer so that the solder flows evenly and can wick into the joint.

I would have cut the key pins rather than remove them entirely. This adds strength to the header, especially when there are only two pins adjacent.

J9 isn't factory, but the soldering on it is excellent.

Be careful with the through holes for those zeners. They are fragile.

I hope you got the Sargetn 1028-CT or 1026-CT from Ed. Great tool!
--
Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
http://www.Team-EM.com
http://webpages.charter.net/chibler/Pinball/index.htm
http://www.PinWiki.com - The new place for pinball repair info

#7 3 years ago

I'd add a bit more solder on all joints. The pins get a lot of punishment when fitting and removing connectors, and can also get a bit of stress on them just from the connectors being pushed, pulled, etc. I make sure the entire pad is covered smoothly, and the solder travels a reasonable way up the pin.
Definitely, cut the key pins rather than removing them. The plastic base can twist and move without them. Probably not a big deal though, maybe not worth trying to get them back in there at this point.
Fully agree with Chris re J9 - looks like factory, but isn't! Cleaning away traces of flux is time consuming and not really necessary, but gives such a professional looking result.

#8 3 years ago

Nice work! It's deeply satisfying to repair a GI connector and header, and then see your GI come back to life. I just did this on Skateball.

#9 3 years ago

I would definitely leave the key pin and probably a little more solder, they almost look dry. And definitely clean up the flux on the other headers too!

But better than a lot I see!

#10 3 years ago

Your work looks good (as John said add a little more solder). The pins at the top of the photo do not look great. Looks like heat was applied to the lead instead of the lead/pad junction.

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#11 3 years ago

Thanks for the feedback guys. I knew better than to pull out those key pins so I have no defense for that

Chris, I did order the 1026-CT from GPE based on your recommendation in a 3 year old thread floating around here. Will update thread after I get a chance to crimp the actual connectors and finish the job.(should be here on Thursday)

This picture is the interconnect from my Police Force - it has no issues with GI currently but appears in need of replacement
too
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I will do this one this weekend using the suggestions given in this thread and see if I can improve on the soldering/amount of solder/pad covering/flux cleanup

#12 3 years ago

Yep, that's been pretty warm there! Far more important to replace the loom connector than the pins though. If you use Trifurcon contacts, the burn won't happen again. Of course, if the pins on the board are damaged (burnt, corroded etc) you will certainly have to do those too.

#13 3 years ago
Quoted from falco:

Yep, that's been pretty warm there! Far more important to replace the loom connector than the pins though. If you use Trifurcon contacts, the burn won't happen again. Of course, if the pins on the board are damaged (burnt, corroded etc) you will certainly have to do those too.

You *always* need to replace both the male and the female side of the connector. Once the connector gets hot enough to burn the housing, the plating on the pins have been compromised. Just replace 1 side, and the other side will burn again quickly.

#14 3 years ago
Quoted from johnwartjr:

You *always* need to replace both the male and the female side of the connector. Once the connector gets hot enough to burn the housing, the plating on the pins have been compromised. Just replace 1 side, and the other side will burn again quickly.

With the Trifurcon, the center contact bears on a slightly different area than the single-contact pin, plus the two side contacts bear on fresh plating. As good practice, I do agree (and I usually do this when working on others' machines). However, in the real world, I've done only the loom connectors on my own machines when there's no obvious damage to the pins/board. They run stone cold (notably DE/sys11 GI, WPC GI).
I guess if I were replacing a single-contact pin with another, I'd replace the board connector as well because it will have suffered. But I'd never do that...
- if a pin is carrying enough current that it's having trouble coping, it's getting a Trifurcon. They're cheap.
- I always replace PCB headers with visibly compromised plating or burn (and I have VERY good eyesight for this particular purpose).

(Admittedly, part of the reason I'm even mentioning this is that the OP may need to get more soldering practice in, so removing connectors from boards unnecessarily may do more harm than good.)

#15 3 years ago
Quoted from johnwartjr:

You *always* need to replace both the male and the female side of the connector. Once the connector gets hot enough to burn the housing, the plating on the pins have been compromised. Just replace 1 side, and the other side will burn again quickly.

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#16 3 years ago

Finally got my 1026-CT crimper after USPS delivered it to the wrong address. Time to go to work!

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For better or worse this is what I ended up with. Critiques and comments welcomed

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For anybody that has never done this before I found it very easy if you put the new crimp contact into the crimper and close it just enough to hold it in place - then insert the wire and crimp. I also found it easier to do all the wire connections first then go back and crimp all the wire insulation.

General Illumination!! Yes, i have at least one bulb out

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#17 3 years ago

That crimp tool can crimp both the kind of crimps you made and also "B" type crimps, which I like better. the "B" type crimp bites into the insulation. Just use the other side of the jaw.
--
Chris Hibler - CARGPB #31
http://www.Team-EM.com
http://webpages.charter.net/chibler/Pinball/index.htm
http://www.PinWiki.com - The Place to go for Pinball Repair Info

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