(Topic ID: 71957)

Question about replacing a transistor...


By Darkslide632

5 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 14 posts
  • 8 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 5 years ago by thedefog
  • Topic is favorited by 2 Pinsiders

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transistor.jpg

#1 5 years ago

So, I'm finally getting around to fixing my Lights... Camera... Action, and I pulled the driver board today so I could replace a transistor. When I flipped it over, it looked to me like the trace from the transistor was shot, and that I'd probably need to run a small jumper to the resistor. I figured I'd post a picture and ask what others thought before I did that, however, as I've never done any repairs like this before.

Thanks, Pinside!

transistor.jpg
#2 5 years ago

Check the continuity to determine if that's needed.

#3 5 years ago

Check it with a meter, if trace is broken then run a jumper over it.

LTG : )

#4 5 years ago

Alright, so, can someone talk the newb through the process? I've known that I was going to need to pick a meter up at some point, as it's obviously something you will eventually need owning pinball machines, but as of yet I haven't needed one. These seems like as good an excuse to go pick one up as any, and time to start learning about how to do more than replace a coil, I guess.

#5 5 years ago
Quoted from Darkslide632:

Alright, so, can someone talk the newb through the process?

If you mean the check it with a meter process: Put the meter in diode/continuity mode. Touch the probes together and you will get a beep or a zero reading on the meter. Now put the probes on each side of the trace and see if the same thing happens. See the following article.

http://pinballrehab.com/1-articles/solid-state-repair/tutorials/122-electronics-tutorial-test-equipment

#6 5 years ago

Any inexpensive digital meter will do fine for checking voltages and continuity. $10 on eBay.
ebay.com link » New Digital Lcd Multimeter Xl 830l Voltmeter Ammeter Ohmmeter Ohm Volt Tester

I've got that exact one, works just as well as my $120 Fluke meter.

#7 5 years ago

Thanks! Bookmarked.

Thanks, thedefog.

#8 5 years ago

Whoa there professor! Looks like the pad on the bottom in that pic is gone too. I wonder what's left of the top pad/trace you may need to run a jumper for that one as well. I advise you to get some training & education on electronics, or at least read up on the techniques and tools of electronics before continuing repairs like this.

#9 5 years ago

Appreciate the feedback. I have a friend who is going to help me out tonight, but just letting him do it doesn't do much to further my ability to fix things myself, so I figured I would ask questions and gather as much info as I could because I'll eventually want/need to do these things on my own.

That said, I paid $400 for the machine. It's SUPPOSED to be a machine I can experiment on

#10 5 years ago
Quoted from Darkslide632:

Appreciate the feedback. I have a friend who is going to help me out tonight, but just letting him do it doesn't do much to further my ability to fix things myself, so I figured I would ask questions and gather as much info as I could because I'll eventually want/need to do these things on my own.
That said, I paid $400 for the machine. It's SUPPOSED to be a machine I can experiment on

That's good. You have not spent much, and you consider it to be something to learn on. Just remember that it is not a toaster. It's quite a bit more complex, and the field of electronics is complex.

Getting help is fine too, as long as the friend has the proper knowledge and experience - no problem with that at all.

#11 5 years ago

Well, even if the trace was still good, it probably couldn't hurt that bad to jumper it, right?
But this is certainly a good occasion to learn to check continuity. Couldn't be easier: touch two points on the circuits with the two probes - beep! is for continuity, no beep! is for no continuity...

#12 5 years ago

I would scrap it clean and see what is there - the meter might say that it is ok, but if the trace has been damaged and is barely making contact, the meter would say it was ok. You will also need to make sure that the trace if damaged is not making contact were it shouldn't as well.

Use a small wire brush to clean up the area - it will take the green paint off the copper trace, but that is no big deal, but at least the crud will be gone.

Yes, I also looks like the pads have been damaged to me as well - you iron is too hot or you held it in place way too long. If the pad is gone, you will have to use a jumper.

Sounds like you are a beginner, if you are going to attempt this yourself, I would recommend you use some small insulated gauge (24 gauge should be ok) wire to make the repair. You could use leads cut off a resistor to rebuild the trace, but that is a bit more advanced as you will have to solder the lead to the existing trace and is would not be easy to do for a beginner as it is a small area to work within.

#13 5 years ago

I didn't take the old one out. It was already gone when I got it... though i didn't notice. Gonna take it over to a friends place tomorrow so he can have a look at it. If he thinks it's beyond him (I don't believe it is), I have another friend in town who has his own repair shop. I'd like to be involved as much as I can, however, so I appreciate all the feedback.

Thanks again!

#14 5 years ago

Just take your time and do a lot of reading. If you feel unsure or uncomfortable about doing something, stop right away and do a little research on it. It isn't worth the work to undo a serious mistake. There are plenty of good instructional videos for all of this stuff (as well as bad ones too), but for the most part, you can learn the basics fairly quickly. And everyone makes mistakes and screws shit up from time to time. I see from your posts you're not afraid of that, which is a good start.

It isn't as complicated or intimidating as it seems if you just break things up into smaller chunks. I've been tinkering in electronics for about 15 years now, but it only took a year of little projects here and there to understand all of the basics. The rest was just learned while I was working on a variety of different things.

I started with guitar effects pedal building, which is a great way to get into this stuff and is extremely simple. You also get the instant-gratification factor of building a working effect in an hour or so.

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