(Topic ID: 175593)

Pyprocgame or Mission Pinball Framework


By Glarrownage

4 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 16 posts
  • 8 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 4 years ago by chadderack
  • Topic is favorited by 4 Pinsiders

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    #1 4 years ago

    I know the answer to this question is pure preference and it can be very difficult to find an objective opinion, but I figured I would ask anyway. I'm getting into my first retheme and I'll be using a PROC board since I'm more familiar with it. For those of you who have built machines with both frameworks, which do you prefer Pyprocgame or Mission Pinball Framework and why? Thanks in advance for your time.

    #2 4 years ago

    Please consider SkeletonGame (an enhancement over pyprocgame which gets you flipping faster) in your research. http://SkeletonGame.com

    Archer, Buffy, Doom, Total Annihilation, and Iron Man HD are running in top of it (and it runs on top of pyprocgame)

    Good luck in your quest

    #3 4 years ago
    Quoted from Mocean:

    Please consider SkeletonGame (an enhancement over pyprocgame which gets you flipping faster) in your research. http://SkeletonGame.com
    Buffy, Doom, Total Annihilation, and Iron Man HD are running in top of it (and it runs on top of pyprocgame)
    Good luck in your quest

    Before doing a ton of research can you summarize the maturity of SkeletonGame versus MPF? Are both platforms independent from P-ROC to FAST? I'm curious which has the best support for LCD versus DMD displays? Which has better support for RGB LED's? etc. Do you happen to know? I wish there was a matrix somewhere comparing the supported features and benefits of each platform.

    #4 4 years ago
    Quoted from Mocean:

    Please consider SkeletonGame (an enhancement over pyprocgame which gets you flipping faster) in your research. http://SkeletonGame.com
    Buffy, Doom, Total Annihilation, and Iron Man HD are running in top of it (and it runs on top of pyprocgame)
    Good luck in your quest

    Yeah, I guess I should have thrown that onto the pyprocgame side of things. Maybe I should have asked about the comparison of MPF and Skeletongame.

    Quoted from Brickshot:

    Before doing a ton of research can you summarize the maturity of SkeletonGame versus MPF? Are both platforms independent from P-ROC to FAST? I'm curious which has the best support for LCD versus DMD displays? Which has better support for RGB LED's? etc. Do you happen to know? I wish there was a matrix somewhere comparing the supported features and benefits of each platform.

    Also interested in all the above information. Very curious about SkeletonGame vs MPF.

    #5 4 years ago

    *edit* Delete this post, it was non-relevant anyways...you already said which boards you're using.

    #6 4 years ago
    Quoted from Brickshot:

    I wish there was a matrix somewhere comparing the supported features and benefits of each platform.

    If people can come up with a list of features to compare, I'll happily create this graph and put it on Pinball Makers.

    I'm using MPF myself, but mostly because I don't know much Python.

    #7 4 years ago
    Quoted from jwilson:

    If people can come up with a list of features to compare, I'll happily create this graph and put it on Pinball Makers.
    I'm using MPF myself, but mostly because I don't know much Python.

    I'll start the list ...

    1) Is the software platform independent of the hardware platform? I know MPF is, not sure about others?
    2) DMD versus LCD support?
    3) Support for RGB LED's? (are there libraries of sample light shows?)
    4) List of standard game features supported (flippers, knocker, slings, etc. etc.) - Need a grid of what is supported by each.
    5) List of non-standard game features supported (game-specific code support for features like the hand mech in JM, or DeadWorld mod in JD)
    6) Support for game menu functionality (coil tests, game features, etc.) - Again, would be nice to see in a matrix I think of all the provided menu features available that can be leveraged for your own game

    #8 4 years ago

    Pyprocgame is hard because of the lack of manual,but very rewarding,powerful and professional.
    Mpf makes your game flip in a few minutes and there is a ton of info in the manual.
    Our machine runs very well on it.
    With no programming skills,we were able to build us a pinball.

    #9 4 years ago
    Quoted from Mocean:

    Please consider SkeletonGame (an enhancement over pyprocgame which gets you flipping faster) in your research. http://SkeletonGame.com
    Buffy, Doom, Total Annihilation, and Iron Man HD are running in top of it (and it runs on top of pyprocgame)
    Good luck in your quest

    Archer as well...

    #10 4 years ago
    Quoted from sk8ball:

    Archer as well...

    Archer utilized an lcd, right? How was that handled? Did SkeletonGame provide support to do that or was that all custom written?

    #11 4 years ago
    Quoted from pinballrockstar:

    Pyprocgame is hard because of the lack of manual,but very rewarding,powerful and professional.
    Mpf makes your game flip in a few minutes and there is a ton of info in the manual.
    Our machine runs very well on it.
    With no programming skills,we were able to build us a pinball.

    I think that speaks volumes about MPF that you were able to build a pinball machine with no prior programming skills. I've read that opinion from others as well.

    I wish I could have a more defined question, but from my experience with any type of development is that typically the more user friendly experience comes at the cost of flexibility in the long run. Does anyone know if there are limitations to MPF as you become more familiar with pinball software development? Sorry, I know that is a very general question.

    #12 4 years ago
    Quoted from Brickshot:

    Archer utilized an lcd, right? How was that handled? Did SkeletonGame provide support to do that or was that all custom written?

    Custom lcd software since there was none when we started the project.

    #13 4 years ago
    Quoted from Glarrownage:

    Does anyone know if there are limitations to MPF as you become more familiar with pinball software development?

    Well, once you get into complex rulesets and/or states, you need to start writing Python code to cover it. For example, to have bonus countdown lightshows on my EM conversion, I had to write code to handle it (ie. flashing the bonus lamp to turn off, add the 1000 points, repeat). The standard mode-based system isn't really set up for complex if/then conditionals in a traditional way.

    Also, it's still an evolving project so sometimes you need to request a feature, but on the plus side the guys are super responsive to the forum and feature requests and turn around is pretty quick. Each release introduces more useful features.

    I'll take that list and put up a grid tomorrow, then solicit answers.

    #14 4 years ago
    Quoted from jwilson:

    Well, once you get into complex rulesets and/or states, you need to start writing Python code to cover it. For example, to have bonus countdown lightshows on my EM conversion, I had to write code to handle it (ie. flashing the bonus lamp to turn off, add the 1000 points, repeat). The standard mode-based system isn't really set up for complex if/then conditionals in a traditional way.
    Also, it's still an evolving project so sometimes you need to request a feature, but on the plus side the guys are super responsive to the forum and feature requests and turn around is pretty quick. Each release introduces more useful features.
    I'll take that list and put up a grid tomorrow, then solicit answers.

    Thanks for the reply Wilson. Writing the Python should be the fun part. I was drawn down this path for Python in particular because I have little to no interest in C or Assembly. When you say the standard mode-based system isn't set up for complex if/then conditionals, do both frameworks allow for that flexibility? Meaning, can I write my own complex if/then conditionals and have it somehow fit into the rest of the framework?

    #15 4 years ago

    I've made the matrix as requested:

    http://pinballmakers.com/wiki/index.php/Programming#Pinball_Frameworks

    Quoted from Glarrownage:

    When you say the standard mode-based system isn't set up for complex if/then conditionals, do both frameworks allow for that flexibility? Meaning, can I write my own complex if/then conditionals and have it somehow fit into the rest of the framework?

    What I mean is, PyProcGame and SkeletonGame are *all* Python. They are basically libraries you load. MPF has configuration text files you write to define things. If you require functionality it doesn't have, you have to write Python code to support it, which is loaded and run by MPF.

    1 month later
    #16 4 years ago
    Quoted from jwilson:

    I've made the matrix as requested:
    http://pinballmakers.com/wiki/index.php/Programming#Pinball_Frameworks

    What I mean is, PyProcGame and SkeletonGame are *all* Python. They are basically libraries you load. MPF has configuration text files you write to define things. If you require functionality it doesn't have, you have to write Python code to support it, which is loaded and run by MPF.

    Really a well-written summary at that link--just what I was looking for. Thanks, man.

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